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Wid’s Year Book 


"WISCONSIN CENTER #00 1919-1920 

THEATRE RESEARCH} 

- 2201 UNIVERSITY AVE. 

UAHISON, W3S, R70& 

Replete with statistical and other information 
of interest to all identified with the production, 
distribution or exhibition of motion pictures, 
including a complete record of all feature 
productions of the year, recorded separately as 
well under lists of productions, directors, stars 
and cameramen. This information should 
prove invaluable. 

It is suggested that this Year Book be filed 
for reference purposes. 

Wid’s Films and Film Folks, Inc. 

71 West 44th Street, New York 
6411 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. 

F. C. (Wid) Gunning, President and Treasurer 
Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President ond Editor 
John W. Alicoate, Secretary and Business Manager 






1919 


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LARftY EDMUNDS BOOKSHOP 
6^58 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood 28. Calif. 

HO. 3-3273 

World s Largest Collection 
of books on Motion Pictures 




""sconsfn Center 



















ELSIE FERGUSON 














The Year in Headlines 


Wednesday, Sept. 4, 19151! 

Wm. A. Brady pleads for amalgamation at American 
Exhibitors’ Association Convention at Chicago. 

Theodore Dietrich to furnish Sherry Service with 
eight more Doris Kenyon features. 

N. A. M. P. I. to aid draft law. 

Thursday, Sept. 5 

Exhibitor bodies merge at Chicago convention. 

Friday, Sept. 6 

William Faversham signs with Famous Players- 
Lasky to appear in “The Silver King.” 

Mutual gets Affiliated Exhibitors films. 

B. S. Moss to produce again. To film “Break the 
News to Mother.” 

Joe Lee appointed general manager, Anita Stewart 
Prod., by Louis B. Mayer. 

Board of Motion Picture Exchange Managers formed 
at Indianapolis. 

Saturday, Sept. 7 

Producers plan fuel saving. 

N. A. M. P. I. plan big “get-to-gether” at exposition. 

Monday, Sept. 9 

Fairbanks to revive “Arizona.” 

Merger of Canadian exchanges. New combination 
called Exhibitors’ Distributing Corp. 

Tuesday, Sept. 10 

Suggestion that same regulations be applied to mo¬ 
tion picture films sent by parcel post as are now in 
force when films are sent by express and freight. 

Jersey studios without electric current. 

District Attorney Swann and Assistant District At¬ 
torney Tally confer on means of preventing film thefts. 

Wednesday, Sept. 11 

New Lubliner and Trinz theater to open in Chicago. 

“America’s Answer” through World Film. 

Mary Pickford considering First National contract. 

Friday, Sept. 13 

Tangle over “Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch” 
rights. 

Saturday, Sept. 14 

Exporters satisfied with censoring done by Com¬ 
mittee on Public Information. 

Wednesday, Sept. 18 

Brady points out danger of new war tax to Senate 
Finance Committee. 

Federal Trade Commission, Washington, gives de¬ 
cision in Stanley Corp. 

Thursday, Sept. 19 

Washington M. P. Corp. declared insolvent. 

Eugene O’Brien signs with Famous Players. 

Paderewski in feature film, “History of Poland.” 

Friday, Sept. 20 

Fighting influenza in theaters. 

Bessie Barriscale starts first of Brunton series for 
release through Hodkinson. 

Rivoli Film Producing Co. starts first production. 

Saturday, Sept. 21 

Frank A. Keeney resumes production. 


Monday, Sept. 23 

First National explains infrequency of Chaplin re¬ 
leases. 

Famous Players-Lasky buy Tourneur’s “Sporting 
Life.” 

Wednesday, Sept. 25 

“Birth of a Nation” syndicate buys “Mickey” rights. 

Thursday, Sept. 26 

Selznick to reissue “War Brides.” 

Saturday, Sept. 28 

Sidney A. Franklin to direct Norma Talmadge in 
eight pictures. 

Robertson Cole Co., exporters, to distribute produc¬ 
tions in U. S. •" 

Monday, Sept. 30 

Industry pledges billion for Fourth Liberty Loan. 

Chicago censors coming east. 

Tuesday, Oct. ] 

Zion Films, Inc., to screen Jewish Mark Twain pro¬ 
ductions. 

Wednesday, Oct. 2 

Robertson Cole to handle eight Desmond films. 

Whartons to release “Eagle’s Eye” through inde¬ 
pendents. 

First National offers $1,200 in prizes for exploitation 
of “Romance of Tarzan.” 

Friday, Oct. 4 

“The Forfeit,” Frank Powell’s first for release 
through Hodkinson. 

Willard Mack resigns from Goldwyn. 

Boston theaters remained closed on account of in¬ 
fluenza. 

Saturday, Oct. 5 

Philadelphia theaters closed for ten days. 

David P. Howells gets foreign rights to United Pic¬ 
ture Theaters productions. 

Select to handle Thomas Dixon’s “The One Woman.” 

Monday, Oct. 7 

Fox still fighting opening of Symphony, New York. 

Tuesday, Oct. 8 

Goldwyn takes over Triangle studios on coast. 

Wednesday, Oct. 9 

Riveria, Chicago, opens. 

Number of Chicago theaters closed by Board of 
Health. 

Hearst-Pathe split. 

Thursday, Oct. 10 

N. A. M. P. I. postpones Victory dinner. 

North Dakota exhibitors to appeal for Sunday open¬ 
ing. 

World gets “Under Four Flags” distribution. 

Friday, Oct. 11 

Producers and Distributors agree on four weeks' 
shut-down on industry on account of influenza epi¬ 
demic. 

Exporters forward resolutions to War Trade Board. 
Want licenses speeded up. 










Monday, Oct. 14 

Lincoln & Parker Film Co. embarrassed by restric¬ 
tions placed by War Finance Corp. 

Stage Women’s War Relief to issue two-reel sub¬ 
jects. 

Tuesday, Oct. 15 

Exhibitors to be asked to use trailers in fuel cam¬ 
paign. 

Companies arranging to issue best of product before 
shut-down. 

Wednesday, Oct. 16 

Many Illinois houses closed. 

Thursday, Oct. 17 

War Trade Board to eliminate license delays for 
exporters. 

A. D. Flinton, Yale Photoplays Co., Kansas City, 
dies. 

Thomas H. Ince asked to be advisory director of 
films for soldiers. 

Douglas Fairbanks in New York to collect a million 
for Loan. 

Friday, Oct. 18 

A. M. P. A. elect officers. 

Forest fires do great damage to theater property 
in Wisconsin. 

Boston theaters reopen. 

Saturday, Oct. 19 

Hodkinson to release two a month. 

Triangle and Mutual return to N. A. M. P. T. 

Monday, Oct. 21 

Louise Glaum sues Paralta for not fulfilling con¬ 
tract. 

Harold Lockwood dies. 

National Film Corp. to build big studio in Holly¬ 
wood. 

Tuesday, Oct. 22 

Goldwyn players leave for the coast. 

Wednesday, Oct. 23 

Sherry affiliates with General. 

R. W. Lynch, brother of S. A. Lynch, dies. 

Indianapolis closing order extended. 

Metro defendant in suit over “Barbara Frietchie.” 

Friday, Oct. 25 

Leading producers called together to thwart Pick- 
ford-First National negotiations in order to end com¬ 
petitive bidding on stars’ services. 

Officers of Lincoln Picture Classics charged with 
embezzlement. 

Saturday, Oct. 26 

Legitimate theaters reopened but picture theaters re¬ 
main closed in Albany. 

Frances Nelson wins verdict against Superpictures 
Distributing Corp. 

' Monday, Oct. 28 

Spoor has new processing machine. 

Chicago theaters to reopen. 

Hodkinson productions go through Pathe. 

Pathe to distribute “Infatuation,” Gaby Deslys, in 
l nited States. 

Charge of fraud against U. S. Exhibitors Booking 
(.urp. 

Tuesday, Oct. 29 

General reopening of theaters on Nov. 4. 


Wednesday, Oct. 30 

Ruling whereby tenant is not liable for rent when 
house is closed by health authorities favors theater 
men. 

Kleine has fresh product for General Film release. 

Thursday, Oct. 31 

“Bill” Hart threatens to leave screen. 

Friday, Nov. 1 

Chicago theaters must meet sanitary requirements 
before being allowed to reopen. 

Robertson-Cole to handle product of National Film 
Corp. 

Fred G. Sliter appointed Foreign Film Commissioner 
by Committee on Public Information. 

Famous Players-Lasky plan Salvation Army picture. 

Saturday, Nov. 2 

Indianapolis celebrates reopening of theaters. 

S-L Pictures formed by Sawyer and Lubin. 

International buys Screen Telegram and Universal 
issues. 

First official showing of “Under Four Flags” at 
Rialto and Rivoli. 

Monday, Nov. 4 

Film Clearing House ready for business. 

Exchangemen in Minneapolis territory claim a loss 
of $100,000 during influenza epidemic. 

Wednesday, Nov. 6 

Hearing in suit of Cora C. Wilkening against Mary 
Pickford starts. 

Closing order lifted in Albany. 

Anthony Paul Kelly sues Henry B. Walthall for 
$5,000. 

Harold Edel, manager of the Strand, New York, 
dies. 

Thursday, Nov. 7 

Chicago “flu” ban lifted. 

Essanay files reply to Chaplin’s counterclaim for 
damages in suit against him for breach of contract. 

Friday, Nov. 8 

Picture being made of the life of Helen Keller, fa¬ 
mous blind woman. 

Affiliated Distributors Corp. takes over Mutual. 

Mary Pickford loses in suit of Cora C. Wilkening. 

Saturday, Nov. 9 

Exhibtors’ Advisory Board formed to cooperate with 
Division of Films. 

Goldwyn buys “Sis Hopkins” for Mabel Normand. 

Conditions in Seattle forbid reopening of theaters. 

St. Louis theaters re-open. 

Monday, Nov. 11 

Lubliner & Trinz open Pershing Theater in Chicago. 

George Kleine System becomes part of Film Clear¬ 
ing House. 

Tuesday, Nov. 12 

Gaumont to expand News issues. 

Mary Pickford signs with First National. 

Mutual to be known as Exhibitors Mutal Film Corp. 

Wednesday, Nov. 13 

Hodkinson to release single reels made by Division 
of Films. 

William Desmond to make 20 five-reels and two 
specials for Jesse D. Hampton. 

Iv. W. S. Distributing Co. release “Healthograms.” 









































































































































“Daddy Long Legs” Mary Pickford’s first for First 
National. 

Closing ban lifted in Seattle. 

Indianapolis ministers oppose Sunday shows. 

Thursday, Nov. 14 

Triangle denied injunction in suit against Wm. S. 
Hart for violation of contract. 

Friday, Nov. 15 

Community Motion Picture Bureau to ship 2,000,000 
feet of film to Italian Army. 

Exhibitors to have 50 per cent, representation in 
N. A. M. P. I. 

Saturday, Nov. 16 

Paragon Pictures, Inc., formed. 

George Loane Tucker appointed director general of 
Anita Stewart Attractions. 

Strand to pay $3,000 a picture for Anita Stewart 
series. 

Lois Weber to direct second Anita Stewart produc¬ 
tion. 

Tuesday, Nov. 19 

Fox re-issuing certain pictures under title of “The 
Big Nine.” 

Famous Players sign Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew. 

Thursday, Nov. 21 

Robertson-Cole to furnish films to Affiliated-Mutual. 

Pathe making propaganda film for Government. 

Saturday, Nov. 23 

Frank Keenan to make eight pictures for release 
through Pathe. 

Hobart Henley to direct for Goldwyn. 

Monday, Nov. 25 

Action of Senate Finance Committee cuts rental tax 
in half. 

Tuesday, Nov. 26 

Chicago authorities disagree over permit for “Finger 
of Justice.” 

Hodkinson making film of army life called" Made in 
America.” 

Wednesday, Nov. 27 

Goldwyn Secures Louis Bennison productions. 

“Finger of Justice” cannot be shown in Chicago. 

Friday, Nov. 29 

Picture men to take part in reconstruction confer¬ 
ence at Atlantic City. 

Jack Pickford to make three for First National re¬ 
lease. 

Saturday, Nov. 30 

Losanco Super-Plays, Inc., organized in Los Angeles. 

Australian public reject war films. 

Monday, Dec. 2 

Marshall Neilan to direct Mary Pickford in “Daddy 
Long Legs.” 

“Little Women” to be Paramount-Artcraft special. 

Virginia Pearson Photoplays, Inc., formed. 

Export censorship dropped. 

Tuesday, Dec. 3 

Goldwyn to distribute Ford Weekly. 

James Kirkwood to direct Jack Pickford. 

Wednesday, Dec. 4 

George Loane Tucker to make independent produc¬ 
tions. 

Friday, Dec. 6 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer to open Randolph theater 
in Chicago. 

Saturday, Dec. 7 

Sol Lesser to build studios in San Francisco. 

Monday, Dec. 9 

Louise Glaum forms own company to produce under 
■upervision of Alan Dawn. 


Tuesday, Dec. 10 

First National signs Norma Talmadge. 

Wednesday, Dec. 11 

Canadian Government objects to American war 
films. 

W. A. Brady and P. J. Schaefer quit National Asso¬ 
ciation after stormy row. 

McClure to produce picture starring Samuel Gom- 
pers in story of his life. 

Thursday, Dec. 12 

“Her Mistake,” Julius Steger’s film, to be first of 
10-20-30 series. 

Much discussion over resignation of Brady and 
Schaefer from National Association. 

Friday, Dec. 13 

Walter W. Irwin leaves Vitagraph; succeeded by 
John M. Quinn, formerly studio manager. 

Monday, Dec. 16 

Pathe to produce pictures showing athletics in slow 
motion. 

Wednesday, Dec. 18 

Hiram Abrams and B. P. Schulberg resign from 
Paramount. 

Thursday, Dec. 19 

War Board removes licenses on shipments to all 
Allied countries. 

William Farnum signs with Fox for 38 weeks. 

Friday, Dec. 20 

N. A, M. P. I. takes action in nation-wide campaign 
against influenza. 

Nazimova to remain in pictures for coming year. 

Tuesday, Dec. 24 

Samuel Goldfish, head of Goldwyn company, has 
name legally changed to Goldwyn. 

Thursday, Dec. 26 

Exhibitors to fight for Sunday opening at Albany. 

Friday, Dec. 27 

Walter W. Irwin joins Famous Players. 

Saturday, Dec. 28 

William Nigh completes picture based on life of 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

Monday, Dec. 30 

Offices of Exhibitors Mutual Distributing Corp. per¬ 
manently established in New York. 

Tuesday, Dec. 31 

Sydney S. Cohen, president of the New York State 
League of Exhibitors, quits Affiliated. 

Treasury Dept, issues export tax ruling. 

Thursday, January 2 

Treasury Dept, issues Export tax ruling. 

Saturday, Jan. 4 

Metro to release three specials a month. 

Monday, Jan. 6 

Cost of ocean transportation on film accessories 
reduced. 

Wednesday, Jan. 8 

First National hold meeting in Los Angeles to “so¬ 
lidify production sources.” 

Ohio exhibitors fighting enforcement of Sunday 
show prohibition. 

Thursday, Jan. 9 

Marks Realty to build Strand i nAlbany. 

Friday, Jan. iO 

Producers contributing to Ohio exhibitors fight 
against Sunday closing. 

Saturday, Jan. 11 

National Film signs Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven 
for series of two-reelers. 

Robertson-Cole secures H. B. Warner for series of 
eight. 



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Since the termination of Miss Brady’s contract with the Select Pic¬ 
tures Corporation under which she starred in “His Bridal Night,” “Red¬ 
head,” “Marie, Ltd.,” and many others, she has finished her initial picture 


with the Realart Corporation, “Sinners,’ 
played the leading role a few years ago. 


in the stage version of which she 


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Monday, Jan. 13 

H. B. Warner signs with Jesse D. Hampton for 
eight pictures. 

Monte Blue to Join Lasky to play leads. 

Tom Wise to produce “Mr. P. T. Barnum” for Rob¬ 
ertson Cole. 

Triangle announces first release schedule since Nov. 

Tuesday, Jan. 14 

Mu tarings of big moves in Los Angeles. 

u - ri Cole open offices in Bos Angeles. 

All- Carl Laemmle dies. 

Wednesday, Jan. 15 

Small towns in Pacific Northwest hit hard by “flu.” 

Staff •apartment arranges for shipments to Russia. 

S' churchmen protest “Salome.” 

Sundat closing fights on in New England and In¬ 
dia na. 

Thursday, Jan. 16 

Stanley Booking Office secures quarters in New 
York. 

Fred Kent succeeds Y. F. Freeman as general man¬ 
ager, Triangle Dist. 

Pirates very active in Cuba. 

Friday, Jan. 17 

Griffith, Mary Piekford, “Doug,” Chaplin and Hart 
combine. Upset plans of nation-wide booking combi¬ 
nation. 

Griffith explains why combination was necessary. 

F. W. Whitmarsh and Walter W. Irwin elected to 
Famous-Lasky directorate. 

Marcus A. Beeman quits Division of Films to rep¬ 
resent Robertson Cole in London. 

Picture and theatrical interests combine to oppose 
proposed 20 per cent. Government tax on admissions. 

Famous Players secure rights to Hall Caine’s “The 
Wo^uan Thou Gavest Me.” 

Saturday, Jai£ 18 

Bill filed in Congress seeks to have Federal super¬ 
vision of pictures. 

Split reported between Jesse D. Hampton and J. 
Warren Kerrigan. 

Sam E. Itorke forms new company, starring Kath¬ 
erine MacDonald. 


Monday, Jan. 20 

Evanston, Ill., ministers plan to give non-commercial 
shows on Sunday. 

Official announcement of United-World merger. 

Sherry secures two Edgar Lewis productions. 

Tuesday, Jan. 21 

Rights to “Snappy Stories” features secured by A. 
L. Siegel for two reelers. 

Fox breaks with Lehrman. Latter will produce 
comedies for open market. 

Ohio State Screen League lines up over 600 houses. 

Wednesday, Jan. 22 

Report of special committee on exposition investi¬ 
gation filed with N. A. M. 1*. I. 

Epworth League fighting Sunday shows in Florida. 

Fairbanks says all members of star combination will 
be producing for new organization by the Fall. 

Gil Heyfron sells interest in Missoula Amusement 

Co. 

Thursday, Jan. 23 

W. C. T. U. in Sunday fight in Indiana. 

Hearst makes bid to secure distribution of Griffith 
combine productions. 

Rothapfel sees good to picture industry in pro¬ 
hibition wave. 


Friday, Jan. 24 

Sherrill to star “Tex” Guinan in two reeler West¬ 
erns. 

D. W. Griffith asked to lead fight in Washington 
against Randall Federal censorship bill. 

Major Funkhouser preparing to wage legal fight in 
Chicago to get back his job as censor. 

Absolute exhibitor control planned for Affiliated. 

Big Features Rights Corp., Louisville, guarantees- 
losses on bookings. 

Saturday, Jan. 25 

Many small towns in Norlhwest do not expect to 
recover fully from “flu” until Spring. 

W. A. Bach appointed sales manager for Hodkinson. 

Saenger’s acquire new Liberty in New Orleans— 
Control 45 houses. 

Board of Fire Underwriters offer important sug¬ 
gest ions regarding handling of film in exchanges, etc. 

Pathe to release Harold Lloyd comedies weekly. 

Monday, Jan. 27 

D. W. Griffith signs with First National for three 
productions. 

Former Censor Funkhouser makes statement that 
large sums were offered him for permits. 

C. E. Shurtleff leaves W. W. Hodkinson. 

National Association makes effort to secure exhibi¬ 
tor co-operation to defeat proposed 5 per cent. tax. 

William L. Gray, manager of Biograph studios, dies 
of pneumonia. 

Tuesday, Jan. 28 

Reported that Fox contract with Theda Bara and 
iee Kiddies will not be renewed. 

Gaumont issues a two-reel special of Theodore Roose¬ 
velt. 

Essanay re-issues four Chaplin features. 

Indianapolis legislature clears way to take up bill 
legalizing Sunday shows. 

Wednesday, Jan. 29 

C. C. Pettijohn leaves to help Indiana fight against 
Sunday closing. 

Chester Beecroft obtains rights for all Robertson 
Cole products for continental Europe. 

Sam Goldwyn back from coast. 

Thursday, Jan. 30 

Influenza causes closing down of all theaters in 
Australia for three or probably four months. 

William L. Sherrill announces a series of two-reel 
Western specials featuring Texas Guinan. 

Committee of Fifty, St. Louis, seeking new “moral 
laws” for Missouri, charges National Board of Review 
with incompetency. 

Fannie Ward expects to make pictures in England. 

Friday, Jan. 31 

Considerable agitation in film circles over failure of 
National Association to take more active steps with 
regard to pending legislation affecting Sunday shows 
and censorship. 

Saturday, Feb. 1 

David P. Howells sails for Europe to dispose of 
continental rights of First National and United pic¬ 
tures. 

Judge Cardoza files important opinion regarding 
rights of exhibitor and producer. 

Monday, Feb. 3 

Milwaukee censors bar war pictures to prevent race 
prejudice. 

Harry Schwalbe ousted from Peerless Exchange by 
Stanley Booking interests. 

Bill introduced in Minnesota for censors. 



GAIL KANE 












Tuesday, Feb. 4 

Thomas H. Ince renews contract with Famous Play¬ 
ers. 

Bill introduced in Indiana legislature providing 
censors. 

Wednesday, Feb. 5 

William G. McAdoo, formerly Secretary of the Treas¬ 
ury, joins “Big Five” as general counsel. 

C. L. Chester to release 52 travel pictures through 
First National exchanges. 

Frank P. Donovan, former Vitagraph director, starts 
new organization. 

Adolph Zukor back from coast. 

Thursday, Feb. 6 

Frederick L. Collins suggests McAdoo and Fair¬ 
banks for presidential ticket. 

Petitions being circulated throughout Washington for 
Sunday shows. 

Malcolm Strauss Feature Films to produce series 
with Leila Hope. 

Friday, Feb. 7 

Henry Lehrman starts making twelve two-reel 
comedies for open market. 

Mildred Harris implies that negotiations are under 
way to transfer her contract from Universal to First 
National. 

Plans announced for Rothapfel Pictures Corp. Will 
furnish six full programs a year including features, 
scenics, etc., together with complete musical scores 
and plans for lighting effects, incidental entertain¬ 
ments, etc., Frank G. Hall, vice-president. 

Bill filed at Albany to allow each community in New 
York State to decide whether or not Sunday pictures 
are wanted. 

Stoll Film Co., Ltd., London, secures Goldwyn for 
Great Britain. 

N. A. M. P. I. to amend by-laws to accept exhibitors 
as members. 

Saturday, Feb. 8 

Charles S. Hart, Division of Films, returns from 
abroad. 

Income tax bill includes 5 per cent, rental tax and 
heavily increased taxes on all incomes in excess of 
$4,000. 

D. W. Griffith announces first repertoire of moving 
pictures for a Broadway theater. 

Monday, Feb. xo 

Charles S. Hart announces Division of Films to close 
in 60 days. 

Tuesday, Feb. 11 

McAdoo not to give entire time to “Big Four.” 

Albert Capellani leaves Metro. Will feature June 
Caprice and Creighton Hale in a series. 

Famous Players secures “Secret Service.” 

Thursday, Feb. 13 

Roxy announces he will not direct productions for 
his new company, but will supervise. 

St. Louis showmen organize to fight the Greater 
Amusement Co. 

Film thefts result in two arrests in New York, and 
one in Philadelphia, F. I. L. M. Club active in prose¬ 
cution. 

“Big Four” will have distribution headquarters in 
New York. 

Hampton Del Ruth joins Fox and will make comedies 
on coast. 

Seattle theaters reopen. 

Dr. A. H. Shields arrested on charge of selling stock 
in fraudulent film concern in Chicago. 

Hildinger Enterprise is to erect 3,000 seat house in 
Trenton, N. J. 


Friday, Feb. 14 

Famous to star Ethel, John and Lionel Barrymore 
in “Peter Ibbettson.” First time they have ever 
worked together. 

Many important productions secured by Vitagraph 
in purchase of Kalem and Lubin properties. 

J. Frank Brockliss arrived from London. 

Herbert Blache follows Capellani in directing Nazl- 
mova. 

Triangle to reissue Keystone comedies. 

Hearst cartoons to be released through Educational. 

Saturday, Feb. 15 

New York exhibitors called to meet at Syracuse on 
Feb. 26. 

Select to open branches throughout Canada. 

G. W. Bradenburg, Philadelphia, exchange man, re¬ 
leased after hearing on charge of receiving stolen 
film. 

Signs removed from offices leased for Stanley Book¬ 
ing Office on 42d street, New York. 

Monday, Feb. 17 

Carl Laemmle leaves for coast; appoints Tarking- 
ton Baker general manager, Universal. 

Chaplin completes two more comedies. 

Clara Kimball Young, according to figures in a law 
suit, received over $340,000 for nine productions from 
C.K.Y. Film Corp. 

Tuesday, Feb. 18 

General Pershing to receive print of “Made in Amer¬ 
ica” to show troops abroad. 

I. E. Chadwick, president of F. I. L. M. Club, plans 
round-up of film thieves. 

Albert Capellani announces plans of his new pro¬ 
ducing company. 

Strong tights on in Iowa, Nebraska and So. Dakota 
for censorship and Sunday closing. 

Wednesday, Feb. 19 

George Loane Tucker to make series of special fea¬ 
tures for Famous Players-Lasky. Director secures un¬ 
usual contract from Mayflower Film Corp. 

Zane Gray Pictures Co., B. B. Hampton, president, 
to film Gray novels on coast. 

Thursday, Feb. 20 

Paramount-Artcraft plan a number of specials in 
which the work of important directors will be featured. 

Censorship Committee, N. A. M. P. I., notifies Okla¬ 
homa exhibitors that if proposed censorship is enacted 
that they will not ship film into state. 

Monday, Feb. 24 

Adolph Zukor secures “Fatty” Arbuckle for three 
years. 

C. E. Shurtleff secures picture rights to Jack Lon¬ 
don’s works. 

“The Unpardonable Sin” will be state righted. 

William Stoermer forms Photoplay Trading Co. to 
handle state rights productions. 

Robertson Cole and Col. Wm. N. Selig in litigation 
over the Selig $40,000 library. 

Tuesday, Feb. 25 

Wm. A. Brady changes his mind and remains as 
president of the N. A. M. P. I. until June. 

Regal Films to handle United Pictures in Canada. 

Wednesday, Feb. 26 

Distributors using billboards exercised over advance 
of about 30 per cent, billboard rates. 

Official announcement made that Stanley Booking 
Office will quit in New York. 



Dolores Cassinelli 

“The Italian Cameo Girl” 


Featured in Special Capellani 
Productions released by Pathe 

















Thursday, Feb. 37 

Federal Trade Commission starts hearing on alleged 
unfair competition methods of Joseph Simmonds and 
W. H. Productions Co. 

New York State Exhibitors League assembles in 
Syracuse to discuss Sunday legislation. 

Friday Feb. 38 

Famous Players secure Irene Castle to appear in a 
Robert W. Chambers’ story. 

William A. Brady guest of honor at Ritz, of Pro¬ 
ducers and Distributors division of N. A. M. P. I. 

Lee Ochs starts clubhouse idea for the entire in¬ 
dustry. 

Goldwyn will not renew Mae Marsh contract. 

Grauman’s to erect two million-dollar houses in Los 
Angeles. 

Pathe to release Perret’s “Stars of Glory” as a 
special. 

District Attorney’s office starts investigation of al¬ 
leged grafting among small houses in New York city. 

Saturday, March 1 

William Fox and “Winnie” Sheehan to sail for Eu¬ 
rope next week. 

Famous Players secure rights to “Everywoman” and 
“The Admirable Crichton.” 

Sydney S. Cohen re-elected president of Exhibitors 
League of New York. 

Monday, March 3 

Oscar A. Price, assistant Director General of Rail¬ 
roads becomes president of the United Artists Asso¬ 
ciation. 

Grand Jury investigation into alleged graft prac¬ 
ticed by members of Fire Prevention Bureau, con¬ 
tinued. 

Dr. Ellis P. Overholzer gives some ideas on unde¬ 
sirable pictures before the Chicago Censorship Com¬ 
mission. 

Tuesday, March 4 

Cliff Smith to direct Texas Guinan. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., shows must close on Sundays. 

National Board of Review selects Nazimova’s “Out 
of the Fog,” to demonstrate strides made in artistic 
photography in America. 

Charles E. Van Loan, well-known author, dead, at 
Philadelphia. 

C. F. Zittel named chairman of the special com¬ 
mittee to work on proposed clubhouse for industry. 

Muriel Ostriche Brady sues parents for accounting. 

Wednesday, March 5 

Famous Players sign Houdini for a series of mystery 
stories. 

Adolph Zukor to again lead industry in next Liberty 
Loan Campaign. 

Hiram Abrams named general manager of the dis¬ 
tributing organization of the “Big Four.” 

Yale Photoplay Corp., formerly operated by A. D. 
Flinton, Des Moines, closes out business. 

Thursday, March 6 

Frank Lloyd leaves Fox. 

Samuel Goldwyn leaves for coast. Will make fewer 

onrl 'hpff'PT DlVtlirP^ 

Pathe changes title of “Stars of Glory” to “The Un¬ 
known Love.” 

Red hot tight being waged in Nebraska over pro¬ 
posed censor and Sunday laws. 

Friday, March 7 

William Fox sails to establish distributing and pro¬ 
duction plants in Europe. 

Pyramid Pictures, Inc., Harold J. Binney, presi¬ 
dent, closes down New Haven plant. Studio fixtures, 
etc., attached by creditors. 


William Fox secures “Checkers.” 

Washington M. P. Corp. sells “Fool’s Gold” and will 
resume operations. 

Saturday, March 8 

Bonnie-Reed Film Mfg. Co. talking of ten studios 
and $3,000,000 investment in Los Angeles. 

“Pop” Lubin talking of re-entering the business. 

Virginia Pearson Prod, to release through Pathe. 

Monday, March 10 

Stanley Booking secures Victoria, largest house in 
Harrisburg. 

Tuesday, March 11 

Harry Aitken returns from abroad. 

Pathe establishes special department to handle fea¬ 
ture productions. 

Wednesday, March 12 

Professor Burgess, University of Chicago, tells Chi¬ 
cago Censorship Commission that moving pictures have 
a greater influence on children than the church. 

“Flu” ban off in Australia. All theaters open. 

Hiram Abrams reaches New York. Conferences to 
start immediately on organization of United Artists. 

Eugene O’Brien will be starred by Select. 

Hodkinson to distribute Artco series made by Harry 
Raver. 

Few believe reported embargo on American made 
film to Australia, to be correct. 

Thursday, March 13 

Joint Codes Committee, New York Legislature, holds 
hearing on proposed Sunday legislation. 

Northern New Jersey towns in trolley strike. Busi¬ 
ness affected. 

William R. Hearst to produce important series under 
name of “Cosmopolitan Productions” to be released by 
Famous Players. Deal involves- $5,000,000. 

Friday, March 14 

Famous Players-Lasky declare $1.50 dividend—first 
in eighteen months. 

Territorial Sales Corp. backed by important organ¬ 
ization, to distribute Jester Comedies and big features 
on state rights basis. 

Hodkinson to work along lines of fewer and bet¬ 
ter pictures. 

Charles Richman to produce independently. 

Hiram Abrams handling latest George Beban fea¬ 
ture as a state rights special. 

Ruben and Finkelstein secure United franchise for 
Minneapolis. 

Saturday, March 15 

International to build studio near New York. 

Monday, March 17 

Frank A. Tichenor resigns as general manager and 
vice-president of General Film. 

Hall Benedict Studios take over old Mutual plant 
at College Point, L. I. 

Tuesday, March 18 

Eugene Moore, veteran director, organizes to pro¬ 
duce independently. 

J. A. Berst predicts revival of production in the 
east. 

Richard A. 'Rowland, Metro, leaves for the coast. 

Capellani starts work on his first independent pro¬ 
duction, “Oh, Boy.” 

Goldwyn appeals from Penna. Censor’s verdict on 
“The Brand.” 






















Wednesday, March 19 

Macauley feature, “Whom the Gods Would Destroy” 
to be released through First National. 

William L. Sherrill signs Mack Swain for three 
years. 

W. A. Bach resigns as sales manager for Hodkin- 
son. 

Johnny Dooley, eccentric comedian, to produce 
comedies under the name of Dooley Comedies, Inc. 

Frederick L. Collins, McClure Prod., sails for Eng¬ 
land. 

Proposed censorship for Nebraska defeated. 

Thursday, March 20 

William A. Brady leads film men in fight against 
changing censorship headquarters from Philadelphia 
to Harrisburg, Pa. 

Friday, March 21 

The club for the industry suggested by C. F. Zittel 
will have no connection with any other organization 
and will be known as the Motion Picture Business 
Men’s Club. 

William A. Brady quotes scriptures in Pennsylvania 
“blue” law fight. 

Evanston, Ill., exhibitors agree not to use Jack Pick- 
ford pictures unless he can disprove statements affect¬ 
ing his loyalty. 

Saturday, March 22 

Famous Players-Lasky to build immense studio and 
. laboratory in Long Island city. 

Charles Pathe will arrive in this country next 
month. 

House in Connecticut passes bill legalizing Sunday 
shows. 

Emile Chautard joins Mayflower. 

Monday, March 24 

Fox to establish headquarters in Mexico. 

Martin Johnson and wife leave for South Sea Islands 
where they expect to spend the next three years taking 
pictures. 

Wednesday, March 26 

Pennsylvania Legislature defeats bill which would 
legalize Sunday pictures. 

Ascher Brothers open another house in Chicago. 

Fox sells “Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come” to 
Jack Pickford. 

Thursday, March 27 

All-star cast will produce satirical film dealing with 
censorship problem. 

Paramount leases Universal studio at Fort Lee. 

Goldwyn secures Barrie one-act plays, including 
“The Twelve Pound Look.” 

Zane Grey Pictures to be released through Hodkin- 
son. 

Dolores Cassinelli to be directed by Albert Capellani. 
Features to be released through Pathe. 

Ford Educational being distributed in over 4,000 
j houses. 

Bech Van Siclen and Co. secures foreign rights to 
Blackton’s “A House Divided.” 

i 


[3 

Friday, March 28 

Dorothy Phillips renews contract with Universal. 

New York Senate favorably reports Sunday picture 
legislation. 

National Film production, “The Boomerang,” sold 
to Pioneer Film. 

F. B. Warren, vice-president, Goldwyn, resigns and 
joins W. W. Hodkinson Corp. 

Pioneer Film produces “Virtuous Sinners.” 

New chain started in Western Maryland with eight 
houses. 

Saturday, March 29 

Adolph Zukor and L. J. Selznick in controversy over 
Selznick’s activities with the Myron Selznick produc¬ 
tions, and not giving sufficient attention to Select af¬ 
fairs. 

Many prominent English buyers in this country. 

Catherine Calvert with Famous Players-Lasky. 

Grand Jury returns four indictments in alleged graft 
cases. 

Monday, March 31 

Whartons complete seven reeler, “The Red Peril,” 
based on Bolshevism. 

Tuesday, April 1 

Paul Swan, dancer-artist, to make series for Post 
Pictures Corp. 

Wednesday, April 2 

Stuart Paton organizes independent company to 
make eight productions a year in Los Angeles. 

Evelyn Nesbit to leave Fox at expiration of contract. 

Thursday, April 3 

Directors of National Exhibitors Asso. meet in New 
York. 

Robertson-Cole allied with Jury’s Imperial Thea¬ 
ters, Ltd. of London. 

National Film to make superfeatures instead of 
program release. Hodkinson will distribute. Goldwyn 
to continue handling Capitol comedies. 

Friday, April 4 

Second National Exhibitors Asso. files incorporation 
papers. To operate along same lines as First Na¬ 
tional. 

Division of Films practically completes its work. 

World Film to secure two new stars. Carlyle 
Blackwell contract not to be renewed. World dis¬ 
tributing Chaplin re-issues formerly handled by 
General. 

Fred Stone to make independent productions. 

B. P. “Bennie” Schulberg resigns as assistant gen¬ 
eral manager of United Artists. 

Saturday, April 5 

Lewis J. Selznick purchases Adolph Zukor’s interest 
in Select. 

Vitagraph to move entire producing plant to Holly¬ 
wood next fall. 

Motion Picture Exhibitors League of America, name 
of new exhibitors body. Peter J. Schaefer, Chicago, 
president. 

Monday, April 7 

Harry M. Jenks of London in New York on import¬ 
ant mission. 

Tuesday, April 8 

Charles Miller making series of independent pro¬ 
ductions. 






Wednesday, April 9 

“Birth of a Nation” and “Intolerance” sold for 
Switzerland. Deals practically completed for other 
European sections. 

New York Senate passes Sunday local option bill. 

Justice Mullan decides for defendants in suit of 
Percy L. Walters and James B. Clark against number 
of stockholders of General Film. 

Adolph Osso in Paris completing important deal 
whereby American stars and directors may produce 
abroad. Important French interests interested. Right 
to all Goldwyn productions secured for France and 
Other sections of Europe by firms interested. 

Thursday, April 10 

National Film and Pioneer in deal. 

L. J. Selznick purchases Backer studio. 

Fairbanks’ first independent release will be handled 
as Famous Players special. 

Federal Trade Commission finds Lasso Pictures Co. 
guilty of unfair trade competition in selling re-issues 
under new names. 

Paramount shelves second Caruso production. 

Sidney Drew, of Drew comedies, dead of uremia. 

Friday, April 11 

Deputy Police Commissioner, New York, Mrs. Ellen 
A. O’Grady, charges juvenile delinquency to lurid and 
suggestive pictures. 

W. W. Hodkinson Corp. changes selling policy. 
Hereafter all productions, old and new, to be sold 
singly, under contract. 

Leaders of Methodist Episcopal church consult D. 
W. Griffith in view of plan to show pictures in all 
their churches. 

Oscar A. Price, United States,’ fixes Sept. 1 as re¬ 
lease for first “Big 4” productions. It will be a 
Fairbanks. 

Charles C. Pettijohn advises A. M. P. A. how to 
fight censorship and Sunday closing. 

Monday, April 14 

Balboa Studios, Long Beach, reported sold to Mas¬ 
ter Pictures’ Corp. 

Zeena Keefe signs with World for series. 

Tuesday, April 15 

Richard A. Rowland, Metro, favors percentage plan 
of booking. 

Wednesday, April 16 

Although not passed by Senate, Hyland bill allow¬ 
ing Sunday shows reaches Governor of New Jersey, 
w o refuses to sign it. 

Jack Pickford denies allegations made following 
his honorable discharge from the service. 

Myron Selznick announces 30 productions, including 
six specials for the next year. 

Thursday, April 17 

Charles Giblyn resigns as director general of Selz¬ 
nick Pictures. 

Warner’s sell “The Other Man’s Wife” to Frank 
Hall. 

J. Frank Brockliss, exporter, identified with C. E. 
Shurtleff in producing Jack London Stories. 

Macklyn Arbuckle to produce comedies in San 
Antonio, Texas. Wharton’s of Ithaca, interested. 

Charles Ray signs with Thomas H. Ince. Will make 
eight Paramount pictures. 

Frank Lloyd joins Goldwyn. Formerly directed 
William Farnum. 


Friday, April 18 

William Fox completing negotiations to make pro¬ 
ductions abroad with American players. 

William M. Seabury resigns from Film Clearing 
House and other Frank G. Hall enterprises. 

Chicago Catholic publication smashes uncensored 
pictures. 

Saturday, April 19 

Franchise holders and exchange men of First Na¬ 
tional assemble in New York for annual meeting. 

Marcus Loew acquires control of Cleveland picture 
situation. Will build 17 houses and acquire about 
100 more throughout country. 

Mayflower Film secures Allan Dwan for one year 
to direct specials. 

United Artists incorporate in Delaware for $1,400,- 
000. Stock not to be marketed. 

Monday, April 21 

Mrs. Sidney Drew to continue production of Drew 
comedies. 

Select exchange men meet for discussion of sales 
problems. 

Strand and Rialto celebrating anniversaries with 
special programs. 

Tuesday, April 22 

Samuel E. Morris new general manager for Select 
succeeding Arthur S. Kane. Charles Rogers to be 
sales manager, succeeding J. S. Woody. 

United Pictures announce stock increase from $250 
to $350 per share. 

Edward Jose to make special features.. Joseph M. 
Schenck interested. 

First National announces a series of eight specials 
to be made by Marshall Neilan. 

Wednesday, April 23 

Underwood and Underwood to make industrials. 

First National announce Charles Ray to make spe¬ 
cial series beginning Jan. 1, 1920. Directors re¬ 
elected. Exchange managers of First National organ¬ 
ize sales club. 

Thursday, April 24 

Ascher Brothers, Chicago, book Yitagraph. 

Ernest Truex signs for a series of comedies for 
B. V. K. Co. 

Henry B. Walthall to make six specials for Na¬ 
tional Film to be released through Pioneer. 

Many changes noted in Hodkinson field force. 

Mitchell Lewis to produce independently. 

J. J. McCax-thy to present “The Betrayal” opening 
in Chicago. 

George Siegmann, formerly with Griffith, directing 
for Universal. 

Friday, April 25 

Molly King to make six specials for American 
Cinema Corp. 

William Fox expected back from Europe early next 
month. 

Important foreign deal closed for Nazimova pro¬ 
duction. 

Saturday, April 26 

“Big 4” secures headquarters in Godfrey Bldg. 

Anthony J. Drexel, Philadelphia millionaire, trying 
to revive Standard Industrial Films. 



DORIS KENYON 

Stage and Picture Star 


















Monday, April 28 

Henry Lehrmann to release 12 two-reelers a year 
through First National. 

Exchange men from all over the country report 
business conditions as excellent. 

Robertson-Cole acquire three Beatriz Mitchelena 
productions. 

Tuesday, April 29 

First National contracts for six productions from 
Constance Talmadge. 

Petition in bankruptcy filed against General Film 
Co. 

Hobart Henley to produce independently for release 
through Independent Sales Corp. 

African Film Productions, Ltd., to produce all of 
Sir H. Rider Haggard’s works. 

Illinois exhibitors meet in Chicago. To oppose 
censorship and other bills. 

Willard C. Patterson, Atlanta elected president of 
Southeastern Managers Association. 

Gerald Bacon Prod, to be released through Inde¬ 
pendent Sales Corp. 

Wednesday, April 30 

Charles Pathe arrives from France. 

Famous Players secure “Peg o’ My Heart” in which 
Wanda Hawley will appear. 

David P. Howells says large companies are dump¬ 
ing their product in France. 

Thursday, May 1 

Alma Rubens productions to be released through 
Pathe. 

Herman J. Brown organizes circuit in Idaho. 

Friday, May 2 

Chester Conklin leaves Sennett for Fox. 

Hodkinson to distribute “Benjamin B. Hampton 
Prod.” the works of Stuart Edward White, Winston 
Churchill and Emerson Hough. 

Saturday, May 3 

William A. Brady sails for two months’ stay 
abroad. 

Monday, May 5 

B. P. Shulberg to represent John Tippett in this 
country. 

Women’s Clubs form organization known as Na¬ 
tional Federation for Better Film Workers to fight 
censorship. 

J. A. Quinn, president of Motion Picture Co-opera- 
ti.e Asso. of Los Angeles, here to push project for 
studio in which independent producers can make pic¬ 
tures. 

Tuesday, May 6 

Sales staff promotions at Famous Players-Lasky. 

Robertson-Cole closes important deal with Oriental 
Trading Co. for Far East. 

Wednesday, May 7 

Alice Brady signs with Zukor. 

Ascher Bros, of Chicago to build $400,000 house in 
Cincinnati. To seat 2,500. 

Louise Huff signs for series of six pictures for 
American Cinema Corp. 

Jack Pickford files denial regarding charges rela¬ 
tive to leaving the Navy. 

Elks making picture for U. S. Federal Vocational 
Board. 


Thursday, May 8 

Many notables in the industry send congratulations 
on first birthday of WID’S DAILY. 

Lou Tellegen signed by Goldwyn to co-star with his 
wife, Geraldine Farrar. 

Canadian Exhibitors Film Exchange ready to start 
work. 

General Film to liquidate. 

Friday, May 9 

Musicians on strike in St. Louis. 

Saturday, May 10 

Premiere of S. L. Rothapfel’s First Unit Program 
at Rialto. 

H. O. Davis, formerly with Triangle, appointed 
managing editor for The Ladies Home Journal. 

Percy L. Waters, head of Triangle. S. A. Lynch 
out. 

N. A. M. P. I. fight distribution of “Fit to Win.” 

Monday, May 12 

Hodkinson secures J. Parker Read’s production, 
“Sahara.” 

William Fox and “Winnie” Sheehan return from 
abroad. 

Famous Players-Lasky British Producers, Ltd., 
formed in England with $3,000,000 capital. 

Famous Players-Lasky sales manager meeting 
opens. 

Tuesday, May 13 

J. Warren Kerrigan to go to National Film for Hod¬ 
kinson release. 

Fox to open 12 foreign exchanges. 

Wednesday, May 14 

“Smiling” Bill Parsons pays $15,000 for “The Con¬ 
fession.” 

Emancipation Film Corp. incorporated with $1,000,- 
000 capital. 

Thursday, May 15 

First Rothapfel Program sold to Robertson-Cole 
for all foreign countries. 

Lieut. “Jim” Anderson resigns as sales manager 
for Virginia, of First National. 

Harma Prod, of England, seeking American stars. 

Co-operative insurance plan proposed feature of 
Motion Picture Exhibitors of America. 

World and Pathe opposed to N. A. M. P. I. method 
of censoring productions. 

Receiver appointed for Lincoln & Parker Film Co. 

Friday, May 16 

“Big 4” distribution plans announced. 

Saturday, May 17 

Interests friendly to Paramount purchase Rialto- 
Rivoli. 

Mary Pickford wins before Appellate Division, re¬ 
versing verdict for Mrs. Cora C. Wilkening for 
$108,839. 

Pennsylvania Board of Censors eventually to be 
moved to Harrisburg. 

Wharton’s to make three serials for Pathe. 

Monday, May 19 

Receiver denied for Standard Film Industries, Inc. 








Tuesday, May 20 

Maurice Tourneur to make special series for Fa¬ 
mous Players release. 

Discontinue production of James Montgomery Flagg 
comedies. 

Wednesday, May 21 

Travers Yale to direct Tyrone Power in his series 
for Adanac Films, Ltd. 

Mrs. Sidney Drew to play role of “sister” in forth¬ 
coming productions. 

W. H. to state-right feature “Everybody’s Business.” 

Hodkinson announces more exchange appointments. 

Peggy May to star in Haworth productions. 

Stormy debate over Buck Bill at Springfield, Ill. 

Thursday, May 22 

Record price of $3 a seat for “Broken Blossoms” in 
New York. 

Arthur S. Hyman to enter state right field in 
Illinois. 

Ruby De Remer signs with World. 

Sid Chaplin to make four comedies for Famous 
Players-Lasky. 

Friday, May 23 

United Pictures Production Corp. incorporated at 
Dover, Del., for 33 millions. 

Film folk leave for Richmond to attend celebra¬ 
tion of home-coming Virginia troops. 

Fifteen exchanges to handle “Big 4” product. W. 
T7. Hines, sales manager. 

Goldwyn buys Triangle studios at Culver City. 

J. D. Williams, First National, expresses emphatic 
views on “Single Picture” idea. 

Hamilton, Ohio, Musicians’ Local No. 131 sued by 
exhibitor for $10,000. 

Saturday, May 24 

Kessel’s out of Triangle. 

Triangle to produce in East, and build studio. 

Monday, May 26 

Marjorie Rambeau signs with Capellani for series. 

Samuel Goldwyn announces formation of Eminent 
Authors’ Pictures, Inc. 

Meeting at Nashville to plan exhibitor body for 
Tennessee. 

Maine exhibitors to enter politics. 

Chattanooga wins out in Sunday closing fight. 

Tuesday, May 27 

Hodkinson plans for coming year announced, in¬ 
clude productions from well-known authors. 

National Juvenile M. P. League holds annual meet¬ 
ing. 

Hazel Dawn to make a series of features for Amal¬ 
gamated Film Corp. 

Jules Demaria, president of Association of Moving 
Picture Manufacturers in France, here to promote In¬ 
ternational Exposition to be held in Paris, 1920. 

Wednesday, May 28 

Robertson-Cole contracts for series to be made by 
Brentwood Film. 

William Fox to erect four-story studio in New York 
City to cost $2,500,000. 

Adolph Osso to distribute French-made productions 
in thi s country. 

Goldwyn managers meet in New York. 

Committee of General Welfare of Board of Aider- 
men rejects proposed ordinance that would make Com¬ 
missioner of Licenses Gilchrist official film censor for 
New York. 


Saturday, May 31 

World Film loses injunction proceedings against 
Harry Garson for use of title “The Unpardonable 
Sin,” produced by World in 1916 w r ith Holbrook Blinn. 

Hiram Abrams defines stand on “Single picture” 
release. 

Famous Players-Lasky stock sells at 113 on first 
day listed on Stock Exchange. 

Monday, June 2 

Reported Jule and J. Allen of Canada organizing 
12 million dollar concern to operate houses in this 
country. 

Fifth annual convention of Fox sales managers in 
New York. 

Metro’s policy for coming season calls for “Fewer 
and better pictures.” 

Goldwyn to build studio in east. 

Tennessee exhibitors meet in Nashville to form 
organization to combat “evils.” 


Tuesday, June 3 

Mack Sennett to make three melodramas a year. 

Lois Weber leaves Universal. 

Ralph Ruffner of Rialto, Butte, Mont., now manager 
of Rialto, San Francisco. 

Stanley Company form 15 million dollar corporation. 

Famous Players-Lasky reported seeking controlling 
interest in theater chain in Canada. 

Wednesday, June 4 

Metro foreign department with Harry J. Cohen in 
charge may produce abroad. 

Ralph Talbot heads Oklahoma exhibitors’ organiza¬ 
tion, Theater Owners and Managers Asso. 

Allentown, Pa., exhibitor arrested on charge of in¬ 
cendiarism and blackmail. 

Censors overruled in Philadelphia regarding showing 
of “Auction of Souls.” 


Thursday, June 5 

Nazimova to continue with Metro until end of 1921. 
To make about six pictures a year. 

Mrs. Pickford secures “Pollyanna” for Mary. 

Katherine Macdonald to make six specials during 
coming year for release by B. P. Fineman. 

Victor Kremer will State right entire Essanay cata¬ 
logue formerly handled by General. 

Universal discontinues Spokane, Wash., exchange. 

Friday, June 6 

Permanent injunction restrains Commissioner Gil¬ 
christ, New York City, from interfering with “Fit to 
Win.” 

Saturday, June 7 

Cornerstone of Fox New York studio laid. 

Scandinavian situation to be discussed by National 
Association. 

Monday, June 9 

Grossmith Film Corp. making comedies with Law¬ 
rence Goldsmith as star. 

Hobart Henley starts first independent picture. 

Tuesday, June 10 

Louis B. Mayer forms five million dollar concern in 
Los Angeles. 

Marshall Neilan to build studio. 

Dinner to Charles Pathe. To return to France. 


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Wednesday, June n 

Board of Aldermen turn down bill which would 
make Commissioner Gilchrist censor of all pictures 
shown in New York. 

George D. Baker signs with International to direct 
for Cosmopolitan Prod. 

Klever Pictures, Inc., sue Famous Players-Lasky 
for $100,000. 

Thursday, June 12 

Arthur James leaves Metro to join Fox. 

Church film ready for Methodist Centenary at Co¬ 
lumbus, Ohio. 

V. P. Whittaker appointed eastern representative 
for Select. 

Jess Willard film for Independent Sales release. 

Friday, June 13 

Famous Players form educational and industrial 
department. Nathan H. Friend, general manager. 

Arthur S. Kane forms Realart Pictures Corp. 

Saturday, June 14 

William A. Brady returns from abroad. 

J. A. Quinn plans organization for co-operation in 
industry. 

Carlyle Blackwell to produce independently. 

Wm. S. Hart to produce independently. 

Elsie Janis a Selznick star. 

Famous Players plans for next season announced. 

Monday, June 16 

B. S. Moss in charge of Paramount theaters. 

Robert E. Simon who will build theater on 44th 
St., cousin of C. F. Zittel, of International. 

Mildred Harris Chaplin signed by Louis B. Mayer. 

Tuesday, June 17 

Motion Picture Co-operative Asso. explains aims of 
organization. 

Owen Moore signed by Selznick. 

Julian Johnson sees four circuits of theaters for 
pictures. 

Wednesday, June 18 

Receiver for Crystal Film Corp. 

Wm. A. Brady plans production abroad. 

Cohen and Kaufman of Toronto buy three Mutual 
offices in Canada. 

World Film application for restraint against Harry 
Garson for use of title “The Unpardonable Sin,” de¬ 
nied. 

Dinner at Waldorf to Cohen, Berman and O’Reilly, 
New York exhibitors, big success. 

Famous Players to produce “The Copperhead,” star¬ 
ring Lionel Barrymore. 

Buck Bill defeated in Illinois—no state censorship. 

Thursday, June 19 

Mary Miles Min ter signed by Arthur S. Kane for 
Realart Pictures. 

Pearl White leaves Pathe to join Fox. 

Kessel Brothers to resume production in Fall. 

Over $400,0000 due creditors of General Film Co. 

Ascher Brothers to erect another theater in Chicago. 

Friday, June 20 

Metro productions announced for the coming season. 

Jane and Katherine Lee start first of 12 two-reel 
comedies for Rogers Film Co. 

Percy L. Walters elected president of Motion Pic¬ 
ture Business Men’s Club. 

Capitol Theater, New York, to open in Fall, with 
Douglas Fairbanks’ first United Artists’ release. 


Saturday, June 21 

Louis Meyer to add male star to his productions. 

Metro sales force hears of new productions for the 
coming season. 

Big crowd leaving for St. Louis convention. 

Famous Players to build chain of theaters in Eng¬ 
land. 

Monday, June 23 

Litigation between Clara Kimball Young and Select 
settled. 

Mutual’s Lone Star Chaplin pictures bought by 
Clark Cornelius Corp. 

B. A. Rolfe to make series of productions. 

Blanche Sweet to make a series of productions for 
Jesse D. Hampton. 

Tuesday, June 24 

Exhibitors of Great Britain and Ireland assemble at 
Glasgow and adopt resolutions threatening to boycott 
Famous Players-Lasky unless they receive “satisfac¬ 
tory guarantees” that Famous Players are not asso¬ 
ciated with the large exhibiting company just formed. 

Emmy Wehlen through with Metro. 

Reginald Barker signs long term contract with 
Goldwyn. 

Wednesday, June 25 

Opening of Motion Picture Exhibitors of America 
four day convention session at Hotel Statler, St. Louis. 
Corporation insurance plan chief topic discussed. 

Rounding up film thieves in Syracuse. 

Thursday, June 26 

New York delegation to St. Louis bolts convention 
because of what they claim is unfair representation. 

Friday, June 27 

Constance Binney signed by Realart. 

Hugh Ford to make Famous-Lasky productions 
abroad. 

Saturday, June 28 

Northwestern Exhibitors, led by Clemmer of Seattle, 
organize circuit with 200 booking days. 

Joe Brandt resigns from Universal. 

Monday, June 30 

Rupert Julian out of Universal. 

Tuesday, July 1 

Theodore Dietrich to produce Yance stories with 
Doris Kenyon for Hodkinson release. 

George Eastman to endow “National Academy of 
Motion Picture Art.” Jules Brulatour and S. L. 
Rothapfel interested. 

Wednesday, July 2 

National Association’s self censorship idea dies. 

Samuel Grand of Boston to star Herbert Rawlinson 
in two-reel stories by Chief Flynn of the Secret Service. 

About 300 reels of stolen film involved in Syracuse 
film thefts. 

Vitagraph to conduct extensive billboard campaign. 

James Young to direct Elsie Janis for Selznick. 

Thursday, July 3 

Alice Brady third star of Realart. First release 
“Sinners.” 

Famous Players-Lasky take over Charles Frohman, 
Inc. 

Government investigation under way on Federal film 
irregularities. 

Atlantic Cinema Corp. to invade central and eastern 
Europe with American film. Blumenthal, Yogel and 
others in deal. 

Saturday, July 5 

Joe Brandt to represent National Film in East. 

Irregularities in Federal film service reported to 
exceed $600,000. 




THE GREATEST 
COMPLIMENT 
EVER RECEIVED 
BY ME IS THAT 


I LIVE CHARACTERS 
WHEN I PLAY THEM 


JOSEPH DOWLING 


Address Box 35 


WID’S DAILY, HOLLYWOOD, CALI 


A PART I LOVED 


THE MIRACLE MAN 


George Loane Tucker’s Production 
of that name 










Monday, July 7 

J. A. Quinn to sell Rialto in Los Angeles and return 
east to devote entire time to new million dollar Motion 
Picture and Theatrical Co-operative Asso. of the 
World, Inc. 

Tuesday, July 8 

John C. Flinn only member of N. A. M. P. I. to 
attend Methodist Centenary. 

Warning from Fire Commissioner Drennan, New 
York, against carrying film carelessly in street cars. 

Wednesday, July 9 

Equity Picture Corp. to release Clara Kimball Young 
productions. 

Thursday, July 10 

Jack Eaton, new manager, Strand, New York. 

Marcus Loew’s Cleveland plans call for $8,000,000 
capital. 

Film Building to be erected in Indianapolis. 

Fox to enter competitive field for theaters and cir¬ 
cuits. 

Screen 136 feet high by 146 feet wide used at 
Methodist Centenary in Columbus.—Largest in world. 

Friday, July 11 

Hobart Bosworth signs to star in Ince productions. 
Famous Players exchanges for Canada to be oper¬ 
ated on independent lines. 

Saturday, July 12 

Selznick to build studio in Long Island City. 

Circuit Court of Appeals bars “Fit to Win” from 
New York City. 

Two million women interested in Quinn organiza¬ 
tion. 

Goldwyn millions reported coming from Frank J. 
Godsol. 

Tuesday, July 15 

Fox to spend $2,000,000 for international advertis¬ 
ing and publicity campaign. 

Chicago film thefts run into interesting figures. 
Famous Players new stock issue oversubscribed. 

Wednesday, July 16 

New law covering contracts of stars in California. 
Dempsey, heavyweight champion, may appear in 
pictures. 

Universal to make big African expedition picture. 

Thursday, July 1; 

Cinematograph Exhibitors’ Association of Great 
Britain and Ireland protest against Famous Players 
invasion. 

Friday, July 18 

Northwest Exhibitors open convention at Seatlle. 
Hiram Abrahams of United Artists’ going abroad to 
open exchanges. 

Louis B. Mayer may dispose of theaters in East to 
make productions on coast. 

Pathe declares 20 per cent, dividend; and increases 
capital from three to five million. 

Saturday, July 19 

Sydney Chaplin tells of European production plans. 
Pathe to make another serial with Lillian Walker. 
More Realart exchange appointments. 

Northwest Film convention closes at Seattle. 


Monday, July 21 

Famous signs Lois Weber and Wm. S. Hart for big 
specials. 

Gov. Sproul, of Pennsylvania, vetoes bill to bond 
advance deposits of film companies. 

John W. Noble signed to direct for Yitagraph. 

Tuesday, July 22 

World gets “When Bear-Cat Went Dry.” 

Famous Players plan big production and distribu¬ 
tion of non-theatrical films. 

Crandall to have 10 houses in Washington and 
others in nearby states. 

Motion Picture Production Co. of America formed to 
make King Cole comedies. 

Wednesday, July 23 

A1 St. John to make comedies for Famous Players 
release. 

Universal to produce in East again. 

Raoul A. Walsh to make productions abroad for 
Fox. 

Pathe increases capital stock to $5,000,000. 

Thursday, July 24 

Syd Chaplin sails for France. 

Pioneer signs Grace Davidson. 

Robertson Cole cancels contract with Exhibitors 
Mutual. Leads to court action. 

Friday, July 25 

Pathe film to be made in this country to avoid 
double taxation. 

Universal to release 34 specials a year. 

Famous to release series of “So This Is America” 
comedies. 

Saturday, July 26 

Leonce Perret to make productions abroad afte’ 
completing work with Mae Murray. 

Select to use Universal Fort Lee studio for one year 

Monday, July 28 

Allens start first two houses of American theater 
chain. 

Methodists want 6,000 machines to show pictures 
in churches. 

Judge Mack rules out Robertson-Cole’s charge that 
Exhibitor’s Mutual is insolvent. 

Tuesday, July 29 

Mutual wins out against Robertson-Cole in litiga¬ 
tion over alleged breach of contract. 

Wednesday, July 30 

Harry Raver to reissue “Cabiria.” 

Shuberts and Woods affiliate with Goldwyn. Capi¬ 
tal increased from two to twenty million. 

Western exhibitors join fight to repeal daylight 

saving bill. 





MITCHELL LEWIS 


Current Successes 

“JACQUES OF THE SILVER NORTH” 
“THE FAITH OF THE STRONG” 
“THE CODE OF THE YUKON” 
“THE LAST OF HIS PEOPLE” 
“POLEON” IN “THE BARRIER” 




















11 


Thursday, July 31 

Adolph Zukor becomes member of Board of Direc¬ 
tors of Stanley Co., of Philadelphia. 

Distributors may form corporation to handle own 
film delivery. 

Goldwyn secures 2,000 plays through Shubert deal. 

Friday, Aug. 1 

Plans for N.A.M.P.I. Convention at Rochester. 

Wallace Reid signs with Famous Players for five 
years. 

Goldwyn signs Roi Cooper Megrue and Nina Wilcox 
to do original stories. 

Chicago theaters closed on account of race riots. 

Robert W. Priest forms Independent Prod., Inc., 
with million capital. 

Saturday, Aug. 2 

New Shea House for Buffalo. 

Riesenfeld to open school of opera to aid presenta¬ 
tion of Rialto-Rivoli programs. 

Theda Bara through with Fox. To produce inde¬ 
pendently. 

Joe Schenck to sell out vaudeville interests and de¬ 
vote entire time to Norma and Constance Talmadge 
productions. 

Monday, Aug. 4 

Emancipation Film Corp. buys Mirror Studio at 
Glendale, L. I. 

Public Health Service withdraws endorsement of 
disease films. 

Tuesday, Aug. 5 

Katherine MacDonald Productions taken over by 
First National. 

Robert W. Priest gets worlds rights to Blackton’s 
“My Boy.” 

France puts ban on films restricting showings to 
those depicting actual happenings or facts. 

B. A. Rolfe to produce Robert W. Chambers stories 
for A. H. Fischer Features, Inc. 

Wednesday, Aug. 6 

Zion Films sell “Khavah” to National Film Distrib¬ 
utors. 

Gigantic exhibitors combine reported under way on 
Pacific Coast. 

George Eastman donates $3,500,000 for School of 
Music at Rochester for advancement of music and 
pictures. 

William A. Brady again heads N. A. M. P. I. 

Fannie Ward secured for William A. Brady’s first 
Film D’Art production to be made in France. 

Thursday, Aug. 7 

World Film to produce Lawrence Weber attrac¬ 
tions. v - 

World Film buys Herbert Brenon film featuring 
Marie Doro. 

Theodore Kosloff, the dancer, signed by Famous 
to appear in “The Wanderer.” 

Friday, Aug. 8 

Realart closes with Mayflower for series of Allan 
Dwan productions. 

Vitagraph takes over Ruffell’s system of renting pic¬ 
tures in Europe. 

Buffalo M. P. Corp. to produce film version of 
“The Sport of Kings.” 


Saturday, Aug. 9 

Gordon of Boston, and Gray of Maine combine 37 
New England houses. 

Wm. L. Sherril, Frohman Amusement, resigns from 
National Association. 

Monday, Aug. ix 

Marcus Loew enters legitimate field—to build 15 
dramatic theaters. 

Famous Players restrained from showing “Peg o’ 
My Heart.” 

Tuesday, Aug. 12 

Film actors involved in suit of theatrical producers 
against Equity Association for $500,000. 

E. K. Lincoln to star for American Cinema. 

W. H. Prod, restrained by Federal Trade Commis¬ 
sion from reissuing old Hart films without displaying 
old titles. 

Adolph Zukor reported in control of Kinema and 
California theaters in Los Angeles. 

Wednesday, Aug. 13 

Mutual to release Lone Star Chaplins one every six 
weeks. 

Stromberg leaves Goldwyn to organize exploitation 
department for Select. 

Miami Valley Exhibitors support New York Exhib¬ 
itors on St. Louis stand. 

National Film withdraws from Pioneer Film. 

Bray to release through Goldwyn. 

Thursday, Aug. 14 

Stanley of Philadelphia buys 3 theaters in Camden, 
N. J. 

Arthur James to go abroad for Fox. 

Doraldina to appear in “Sumurun.” 

Ethel Barrymore to make series for International. 

Famous Players to release 17 short subjects in 
September. 

Friday, Aug. 15 

Emile Chautard Prod, to be released through Real- 
art. 

Apollo Trading buy foreign rights on Blackwell 
Prod. 

Universal in $5,000,000 combine with Italian pro¬ 
ducers. 

Baltimore to have $1,500,000 theater. 

Carl Laemmle buys 12 stories for Universal stars. 

Griffith repertory season to be resumed in winter. 

Saturday, Aug. 16 

World to release two reelers edited by Joe Mitchell 
Chappel of Boston. 

Goldwyn lands five first runs in St. Louis. 

Natl. Asso. warns that new shipping cases must be 
in universal use by Sept. 1. 

Miami Valley (Ohio) Exhibitors and New York 
State League may combine. 

Monday, Aug. 18 

Richard A. Rowland, returning from Europe, sees 
need for 5,000 more theaters in France. 

Motion picture operators may strike in sympathy 
with actors. 

Tuesday, Aug. 19 

William Fox buys Washington Theater in Detroit. 

Marcus Loew takes over the Dayton Theater, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 


LEONCE PERRET 




‘THE SILENT MASTER” with Robert Warwick. 

“THE ACCIDENTAL HONEYMOON” with Robert Warwick. 

’ Released by Selznick Pic*. 


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Author and Director of: 


‘THE MILLION DOLLAR DOLLIES” with the Dolly Sisters. 
“LEST WE FORGET” with Rita Jolivet. 

Released by the Metro Co. 

“LAFAYETTE WE COME“ with E. K. Lincoln. 

Released by Affiliated Distributors Corp. 

“THE MAD LOVER” with Robert Warwick. 

“THE UNKNOWN LOVE” with E. K. Lincoln. 

“THE TWIN PAWNS” with Mae Murray. 

“THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR” with Yvonne belva. 

Released by Pathe 

In Preparation : 

“THE A.B.C. OF LOVE’” with Mae Murray. 
“MADAME SALOME.” “KOENIGSMARK. 


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Wednesday, Aug. 20 

Pathe to release J. Stuart Blackton Productions. 

National Association Exhibitors Circuit formed for 
co-operative booking. 

Jack Pickford signs with Goldwyn. 

P. A. Powers wants National Association to declare 
neutrality on actor’s strike. 

Thursday, Aug. 21 

Vivian Moses leaves Select and joins Arthur Guy 
Empey. 

Fred C. Quimby appoints three Pathe branch man¬ 
agers. 

Northwestern Exhibitor’s Circuit issues order to 
bar certain productions in the northwest. 

World Film signs Jackie Saunders, Creighton Hale 
and Raymond McKee. 

Friday, Aug. 22 

Frank Hall organizes Hallmark Picture Corporation, 
capitalized at $2,500,000. 

Monday, Aug. 25 

Louis B. Mayer buys 12 James Oliver Curwood 
stories. 

Loew to build two theaters in Times Square section. 

Battle between Clemmer group and Jensen and Von 
Herberg for supremacy in Northwest. 

Controversy over “lay oft’’ policy in Northwest be¬ 
ing satisfactorily settled. 

Sir William Jury buys entire Metro output for two 
years at cost of $2,500,000. 

Tuesday, Aug. 26 

“Flying A,” American Film Co., will make specials 
only for coming year. 

W. W. Hodkinson to handle entire Billie Rhodes 
series. 

Hiram Abrams to go to Europe in September. 


Gaiety Comedies, Inc., to produce comedies for re¬ 
lease through independent exchanges. 

Music publishers to form company and produce 
films from songs. 

Wednesday, Aug. 27 

Harold Lloyd badly injured in bomb explosion while 
making a scene. 

Pathe to spend $1,000,000 in national advertising 
campaign. 

Kerrigan series sold for Great Britain and Ireland. 

“The Miracle Man” opens at Cohan Theater. 

Equity Pictures to make ten the first year. 

Thursday, Aug. 28 

Hallmark Pictures to go through S. A. Lynch En¬ 
terprises. 

World Film to distribute Waldorf productions. 

Friday, Aug. 29 

Select Pictures, Ltd., formed in London; Maxwell 
Milder, president, and Edith Koch, treasurer. 

Robertson-Cole to release 52 features, 12 specials, 
52 Strand comedies and Martin Johnson’s South Sea 
Island pictures in coming year. 

Brooklyn Strand opens. 

Michigan and Pennsylvania join Miami Valley 
League. 

Expect censorship bill to die in Alabama. 

Saturday Aug. 30 jt'j 

Famous Players secures rights to Morosco plays. 

Vitagraph to make series of pictures from works 
of 12 famous authors. 

Southern California workers demand unionization 
of all studio help. 

Operators and N. Y. Exhibitors League confer on 
higher wage scale. 


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EUGENE STRONG 


Management of EDWARD SMALL 


Important Exchange Cent 

(Indicated by cities names - 
































rs of the United States 


Appearing with black dots) 





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LUCILLE STEWART 



Latest Productions 

“The Perfect Lover” “Sealed Hearts” 

DIRECTION RALPH INCE 












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Geo. 

D. Baker 


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Director of 

Feature 

Productions 


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NEXT CONTRACT 

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Maxine Elliot 

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in 

“The Man Who 
Lost Himself ” 

and 

“White Man” 


Scenarios prepared by Mr. Baker 


130 W. 44th Street 


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STARS or FIRST MAGNITUDE, MASTERFUL DIRECTIONS 

PLAYS THAT TOUCH THE HEART STRINGS 
ARVERTISING OF QUALITY 

T HESE are the reasons why American Cinema Productions have so 
quickly reached the standard that every producer is seeking to attain. 

AMERICAN CINEMA CORPORATION 

WALTER NIEBUHR, Pres. NEW YORK 


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E. K. LINCOLN 

As fighting “Dick Gale” in Zane Grey’s “Desert Gold,” a 
Benjamin B. Hampton Production released through W. W. 

Hodkinson Corporation. 









'L—f 



MOLLIE KING 


















/ 



GEORGE ARCHAINBAUD 

M.F.D.A. 







J.^STUART BLACKTON 



President and Director-General 


J. Stuart Blackton Feature Pictures, Inc. 

RELEASING THROUGH PATHE 


























SYLVIA BREAMER 

Starring in BLACKTON PRODUCTIONS 







c ZTo Exhibitors 

T HE Famous 
Players - Laskv 
Corporation wants 
to assure every ex¬ 
hibitor the co-opera¬ 
tion and honest in¬ 
tention on its part 
to produce only such 
pictures as will 
bring him success 
a^d profit and good 
will—pictures that 
will make it possi¬ 
ble for him to re¬ 
ceive from the pub¬ 
lic at all times an 
admission charge 
commensurate with 
their entertainment 
value. The public is 
demanding consist¬ 
ently fine produc¬ 
tions and is ready 
to do its part if it 
gets value received 
for the price it pays. 

The new Select¬ 
ive-Booking plan is 
devised to reward 

producer. It will 


£A(ot every motion 
picture is a B\r amount 
—Artcraft picture, 
but nearly all the better 


ones are. 



AND ALL THE BETTER 
THEATRES SHCW THEM 


h/wnount — (letcraft 

oMotlon ^pictures 

































































































































When the great 1919-1920 season has become a thing of the past, the history of its won¬ 
derful success will be bound up in the names of these great directors, stars, artists, authors 
and stories: 

CECIL B. DeMilLE—M r. DeMille’s first production “Male and Female,” is an adaptation 
of Sir James Barrie’s play “The Admirable Crichton.” Scenario by Jeanie MacPherson, with a cast 
including Thomas Meighan, Gloria Swanson, Theodore Roberts, Lila Lee, Raymond Hatton, Bebe 
Daniels, Mildred Reardon, Mayme Kelso, Robert Caine, Wesley Barry, Edward Burns, Julia Faye 
and others. 

Thomas H. Inch —The first Thomas H. Ince productions of the 1919-1920 season in¬ 
clude : 


Enid Bennett in “Stepping Out” by C. Gardner 
Sullivan; “What Every Woman'Learns” by Eugene B. 

Lewis. 

Dorothy Dalton in “L’Apache” by C. Gardner Sulli¬ 
van; “The Market of Souls” by John Lynch; “His 
Wif’e Friend” by J. B. Harris Burland. 

SPECIAL PRODUCERS 

Maurice Tourneur—The first Tourneur production is 


Charles Ray in “The Egg Crate Wallop” and “Crooked 
Straight” both by Julien Josephson. 

Douglas MacLean and Doris May in. “Twenty-Three 
and a Half Hours Leave” by Mary Roberts Rinehart; 
“What’s Your Husband Doing” by George V. Hobart; 
“Mary’s Ankle” by May Watson Tully. 


Fatty Arbuckle—His first Paramount-Artcraft feature 
comedies are “Back Stage” and “The Hayseed.” 


Sydney Chaplin—Mr. Chaplin produced part of his first 
Sydney Chaplin comedy in France. 

Dorothy Gish—The New Art Film Company will re¬ 
lease the first new Dorothy Gish production in the fall. 

Mack Sennett—The first new season Paramount-Mack 
Senn'ett comedy is “Uncle Tom Without the Cabin.” 

STAR PRODUCTIONS 
(Alphabetically Arranged) 


“The Life Line,” an adaptation of a famous English 
melodrama with the usual de-luxe Tourneur production. 


George Loane Tucker—“The Miracle Man” presented 
by Mayflower Photoplay Corporation. 

Cosmopolitan—“The Cinema Murder” by E. Phillips 
Oppenheim; “The Restless Sex” by Robert W. Chambers. 


“A Girl Named Mary” by Juliet Wilbor Tompkins, 
starring Marguerite Clark. 

“All of a Sudden Peggy” by Ernest Denny, starring 
Marguerite Clark. 

“Capt. Dieppe” by Anthony Hope, starring Robert 
Warwick. 

“Eliza Comes to Stay” by Henry B. Esmond, star¬ 
ring Marguerite Clark. 

“Hawthorne of the U. S. A.” starring Wallace Reid. 

“His Official Fiancee” by Bertha Ruck, starring 
Vivian Martin. 

“In Mizzoura” by Augustus Thomas, directed by 
Hugh Ford, starring Robert Warwick. 

“It Pays to Advertise” by Roi Cooper Megrue and 
Walter Hackett, starring Byrant Washburn. 

“Luck in Pawn” by Marvin Taylor, starring Mar¬ 
guerite Clark. 

“Miss Hobbs” by Jerome K. Jerome, starring Ethel 
Clayton. 

“Mother” by Kathleen Norris, starring Ethel Clayton. 

“Sadie Love” by Avery Hopwood, starring Billie 
Burke. 

“Sick-a-Bed” by Ethel Watts Mumford, starring 
Bryant Washburn. 

“Speed Carr” by J. Stewart Woodhouse, starring 
Wallace Reid. 

“The Black Bag” by Louis Joseph Vance, starring 
Wallace Reid. 

“The Copperhead” by Augustus Thomas, sta/rring 
Lionel Barrymore. 

FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

“Everywoman” by Walter Browne, directed by George 
Melford, with Violet Heming and all-star cast. 

“Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, directed by 
William D. Taylor. 

“The Grim Game” by Arthur Reeve and John Gray, 
starring Houdini. 


“Counterfeit” by Robert Baker, directed by George 
Fitzmaurice, starring Elsie Ferguson. 

“The Fear Market” by Amelie Rives, starring Ethel 
Clayton. 

“More Deadly Than the Male” by Joseph Gollomb, 
starring Ethel Clayton. 

“The Lottery Man” by Rida Johnson Young, star¬ 
ring Wallace Reid. 

“The Misleading Widow” by F. Tennyson Jesse and 
H. M. Harwood, starring Bille Burke. 

“The Third Kiss” by Heliodore Tenno, starring Vivian 
Martin. 

“The Invisible Bond” by Sophie Kerr, starring Irene 
Castle. 

“The Thirteenth Commandment” by Rupert Hughes, 
starring Ethel Clayton. 

“The Valley of the Giants” by Peter B. Kyne, star¬ 
ring Wallace Reid. 

“The Witness for the Defense” by A. E. W. Mason, 
directed by George Fitzmaurice, starring Elsie Fergu¬ 
son. 

“The Young Mrs. Winthrop” by Bronson Howard, 
starring Ethel Clayton. 

“Told in the Hills” by Marah Ellis Ryan, directed 
by George Melford, starring Robert Warwick. 

“Too Much Johnson” by William Gillette, starring 
Bryant Washburn. 

“Why Smith Left Home” by George Broadhurst, star¬ 
ring Bryant Washburn. 


“Widow by Proxy” by Catherine Chisholm Cushing, 
starring Marguerite Clark. 


“The Sea Wolf” by Jack London, directed by George 
Melford. 


“The Teeth of the Tiger” by Maurice LeBlanc, featur¬ 
ing David Powell and Marguerite Courtot. 

Short subjects—Paramount-Briggs Comedies; Para¬ 
mount Magazine; Paramount-Burton Holmes Travel Pic¬ 
tures; Paramount-Post Nature-Pictures; Paramount Tra¬ 
vel Comedies; Burlingham Scenics, Ernest Truex Come¬ 
dies, A1 St. John Comedies, Mr. and Mrs. Carter De 
Haven Comedies. 


C}>aramount?trtcraflG>icluivs 



_ _ 

...... .....HIM.... ... 


























































VIRGINIA PEARSON 









HERBERT RAWLINSON 


Recent Successes: 


“The Common Cause” “A House Divided” 

“A Dangerous Affair” 

In Preparation: 

A Series of Secret Service Stories, based on 
facts, from the life of Chief Flynn of the S. S. 

Oliver Productions 













». / * ' A 


Carl Harbaugh 


DIRECTING 


Herbert Rawlinson 


Wil 


son 


Mi 


izner 


Playwright 





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Realart’s Policy for 1919-1920 — 
and Forever After 

XJOT only stars who have won nation-wide fame 
through merit and whose box-office value is every¬ 
where recognized— 

Not only books and plays that are the rarest gems of 
literature and that have proved their popular appeal— 

Not only direction that develops dramatic quality, knows 
the possibilities and limitations of pictures, and under¬ 
stands public taste— 

Not only photography that surrounds stirring action 
with an atmosphere of charm and beauty— 

But unswerving, unchanging determination that the 
Realart trade mark shall always mean 

In Production—The Sign of Superiority. 

In Distribution—The Sign of Service. 

To the Public—The Sign of Satisfaction 
To Exhibitors—The Sign of Success. 

Such is Realart policy—a uniform, fixed, standardized 
policy—a policy for this season and all the seasons 
thereafter—a policy exhibitors can adopt with assur¬ 
ance of profit. 

Also Independent Producers of Star Attractions of Dis¬ 
tinction and Specials of Magnitude. 

Let Realart do your worrying! 

Realart Pictures Corporation 

Arthur S. Kane, President 
469 Fifth Avenue New York City 


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PICTURE 



Good entertainment for the public, 
good money for the exhibitors. 
High class productions, the best 
stars, the biggest authors, the finest 
directors, the most artistic camera 
work. 

It is almost impossible to make a 
standardized picture, but- Goldwyn 
has come pretty near to it. Every 
Goldwyn picture faces a board of 
critics within the organization. Each 
critic watches for certain character¬ 
istics, and unless he feels that the 


picture passes, the whole production 
is held up. 

Every Goldwyn picture runs this 
gauntlet, and when it reaches the 
theatre the chances are a hundred to 
one that it is going to make good. 

The meaning of the words * ‘Goldwyn 
Pictures’ * in a sentence is this: They 
are well made, certain to be money 
makers and are backed up by a corps of 
service men who will see to it that no 
stone is leftunturned to get the crowds. 


GOLDWYN PICTURES 

CORPORATION 

Samuel Goldwyn President 





































































FAMOU S 
STAR 



EMINENT 

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Chains of Theaters 


(Due to the many rapid changes in the industry this 
list cannot be absolutely accurate.) 

Alabama 

Montgomery—S. A. Lynch: Strand, Plaza, Grand, 
Colonial. Orpheum. 

Birmingham—Strand, Rialto, Colonial. Mudd & 
Colley Amuse. Co.: Trianon, Princess, Rialto. 

Huntsville—C. L. Hackworth: Jefferson, Savoy. 

Decatur— Strand, Florence, Nev. 

Arizona 

Tucson—Lyric Amusement Co. (Nick Diamos) : 
Pima and Lyric. 

Bisbee—Lyric, Douglas; Grand and Lyric; Nogales, 
Nogales. 

Phenix—Columbia Amusement Co. (George Mauk) : 
Columbia and Muzu, Phenix; Iris, Ray; Rex, Hayden; 
Juarez, Sonora; Isis, Florence. 

Phoenix—Strand Amusement Co. (Richards and 
Naee) : Strand, Hipp and Lamara. 

Connecticut 

New Haven—J. & C. Co.: Palace, South Norwalk; 
Regent, Norwalk and Empress, Danbury. 

New Haven—S. Z. Poli: Poli’s Palace and Lyric, 
Bridgeport; Bijou and Palace, New Haven; Poli’s 
Meriden; Poli’s and Palace, Hartford; Strand, Garden 
and Poli’s, Waterbury; also theaters in Worcester and 
Springfield, Mass., and Wilkes-Barre and Scranton, 
Pa. 

New Haven—N. Gordon: Olympia, New Haven; with 
theaters in many cities in Boston territory. 

New Bedford—Nathan Gordon: Olympia, New Bed¬ 
ford; Olympia, New Haven. (Gordon is interested in 
about forty-five other houses in New England, including 
the Gray chain.) 

Lakeville—Best, controlled by E. J. Stuart, pur¬ 
chases films for Casino, Sharon; Town Hall, Lime 
Rock, and Town Hall, Canaan. 

Colorado 

Denver—Moore and Greaves Amusement Co.: Prin¬ 
cess, Colorado Springs; Rialto, Pueblo; Lyric and 
Princess, Cheyenne, Wyoming; Princess and Rialto, 
Denver; Sterling, Greeley. 

Denver—Swanson & Nolan Amusement Co.: Ma¬ 
jestic, Grand Junction; Rex, Greeley; Grand, Pueblo. 

The only booking organization in this territory is 
the Community Motion Picture Bureau with head¬ 
quarters in Chicago and San Francisco. 

California 

San Diego—Broadway Amusement Co. (G A. 
Bush): Superba, Broadway, and Illusion, San Diego; 
Silver, Strand, Corando. 

Santa Barbara—Portola Amusement Co. (E. A. 
Johnson) : Mission, Palace, Portola and Strand. 

Los Angeles—Gore Amusement Co: Lyceum, Grand, 
Liberty, Regent, Optic, Casino and Alhambra. 

Los Angeles—Grauman Amusement Co.: Grau- 
man’s and Quinn’s Rialto. 

Los Angeles—T. L. Tally: Kinema and Broadway. 

San Francisco—Turner and Dahnken: Tivoli, San 
Francisco; T. and D., Oakland; T and D, Berkeley; 
T and D, Sacramento; T and D, Stockton; T and D, 
San Jose; T and D, Richmond; T and D, Watsonville. 

Bakersfield—Grogg Amusement Co.: Grogg’s Hipp, 
Pastime and Opera House. 

Oakland—Kinema Theater Co. (Emil Kehrlein) : 
Kinema and Franklyn, Oakland; Kinema, Fresno. 

San Jose—James Beatty: Liberty, San Jose; Lib¬ 
erty, Fresno. 

Delaware 

No theater circuits. 


District of Columbia 

Washington—Marcus Loew: Palace and Columbia; 
Crandall Enterprises: Metropolitan, Knicker, Savoy,. 
Apollo, Meaders, Crandall’s and Avenue Grand; Tomi 
Moore: Rialto, Garden, Strand; Home Amusement Co.t 
Carolina. Princess, Home; Marcus Notes: Plaza, Cri¬ 
terion, Empress; D. S. Biron: Liberty, American. 

Florida 

Jacksonville—S. A. Lynch: Arcade, Rialto, Imperial, 
Duval. 

West Palm Beach—Grand, Phillips, Orlando, Rialto,. 
Bijou. 

Sanford—Grand, Alcazar, Prince. 

Tampa—Lyric, Star. 

Georgia 

Atlanta—S. A. Lynch Enterprises, Inc., and Jake 
Wells Enterprises. 

Idaho 

Wallace—W. A. Simmons: Liberty Theaters in Wal-" 
lace, Kellogg and Coeur d’Alene. Idaho; Missoula, Mont. 

Grangeville—T. E. Edmundson: Grangeville, Cotton¬ 
wood and Vollmer. 

Indiana 

Indianapolis—Central Amusement Co. (Chas. Olson) 
Alhambra, Isis, Lyric, Keystone, Palms and Bijou. 

Fort Wayne—Bankers’ & Merchants’ Theater Co. 
(C. W. Mason) : Murray and Murrette, Richmond. 

Iowa 

Sioux City—Ulaza Theatre Co.: Royal, Sioux City; 
Crystal, Plaza and Columbia, Waterloo; Casino, Mar¬ 
shalltown; Isis, Cedar Rapids; Gem, Charles City; K., 
Moreland; Majestic, Missouri Valley; Opera House, 
Onawa. 

Des Moines—Adams Theater Co., Inc., 602 McCune 
Bid. Capitalized at $100,000 and is buying theaters 
outright in towns ranging from 2,500 to 10,000. Now 
own and operate 14 theaters in 11 towns. This con¬ 
cern started operations about Sept. 1, 1918 under the 
name of the Southern Iowa Theaters Co., was incor¬ 
porated about 90 days ago as the Adams Theater Co., 
Inc. 

Des Moines—A. H. Blank: Garden, Palace and Des 
Moines; Strand, Marshalltown; Bijou and Regent, 
Mason City; Family, Casino and Garden, Davenport; 
Rialto and Strand, Omaha, Nebr. These are all first 
class theaters. 

Cedar Rapids—A. J. Diebold (Palace Theater Co) : 
Palace; Palace, Vinton; Palace, Waterloo. Also opei- 
ates under the name Strand Theater Co., the Strand!* 
Cedar Rapids. 

Waterloo—J. E. Hostettler: Palace and Crystal; 
Casino, Marshalltown; Isis, Cedar Rapids; Gem, 
Charles City. 

No booking circuits of individually owned theaters. 

Illinois 

Newman—T. B. Mathews: Illinois, Newman; Grand, 
Oakland; Pastime, Kansas. 

Chicago—Lubliner & Trinz Circuit; Ascher Bros.; 
Marks & Goodman (circuit of 3) ; Balaban & Katz 
(circuit of 3) ; Schaenstadt & Sons (circuit of 5) ; 
Frank Tehilan, Aurora, Elgin, Galesburg, Joliet, Bloom¬ 
ington and Ottawa. 

Blue Island—Fitzpatrick & McElroy Circuits: One 
at Blue Island, balance in state of Michigan. 

Joliet—Rubens Circuit (5 theaters). 





Mt. Carmel—Mrs. H. B. Gould: Gem, Mt. Carmel; 
Phoenix, Lawrenceville; Bijou, Bridgeport; and Arco, 
Olney. 

Lovington—W. C. Senior: Photoplay, Lovington, 
and Garden. Arthur. 

Areola—John S. Quirk: Olympic, Areola, and 
Strand, Tuscola. 

Greenville—R. H. Hickman: Lyric, Greenville, and 
Dixie, Vandalia. 

Taylorville—D. Frisina: Grand, Taylorville, Kincaid, 
Kincaid, and Gem, Pawnee. 

Harrisburg—S. M. Farrar: Orplieum, Harrisburg, 
and Casino, Eldorado. 

Kansas 

Kansas City—Peg Baker, Electric & Grubel’s 10th St., 
Kansas City; Electric in St. Joseph, Joplin and Spring- 
field, Mo. 

Topeka—Lew Nathanson, Cosy and Gem. 

Wichita—Joseph Cooper: The Wichita. Building in 
Oklahoma City also. 

Junction City—Shamberg’s Columbia; also building 
in Hutchinson. 

Pittsburgh—S. A. Daly, Klock and Mystic. Building- 
New Grand. 

Paola—Empress. 

Kentucky 

Lexington—Phoenix Amusement Co.: Strand; Ala¬ 
mo. Paris; Colonial, Winchester, Alhambra. Richmond. 

Consolidated Coal Co.—Mine No. 1 and Mine No. 3, 
Jenkins; McRoberts, McRoberts; Dunham, Dunham; 
Van Lear, Van Lear. 

Middlesboro—Brown Amusement Co.: Brownie; 
Lyric, Lynch. 

Louisiana 

New Orleans-—Saenger Amusement Co., Tulane and 
Liberty Sts.; Southern Amusement Co., Lake Charles, 
Louisiana.; Loew’s Circuit, Atlanta, Ga.; S. A. Lynch 
Enterprises, Inc., Atlanta, Ga. 

Massachusetts 

Boston—Nathan Gordon: Scollay Square Olympia, 
Washington St. Olympia, Gordon’s Olympia, Scollary, 
Boston; Olympia, Lynn; Olympia, Chelsea; Olympia, 
Gloucester; Family and Park, Worcester; Harvard, 
Cambridge; Strand, Dorchester. 

Boston—B. F. Keith: B. F. Keith’s and Keith’s Bos¬ 
ton, Bijou Dream; Keith’s, Lowell; Scully Square and 
■Olympia, Chelsea; Strand, Dorchester; Central Square, 
Cambridge; Harvard, North Cambridge; Park, Family, 
Worcester; North Shore, Gloucester; Olympia, Lynn. 

Marcus Loew: Orpheum, Globe, New Columbia, 
Boston. 

Alfred S. Black; Merrimac Square, New Jewell, 
Lowell. 

Poli: Poli’s, Worcester; Poli’s, Springfield. 

Maine 

Lewiston—Maine and New Hampshire Theaters Co. 
(Headquarters, Mystic Theater; William P. Gray, 
general manager): Empire, Music Hall and Strand; 
Pastime and Cumberland, Brunswick; Cheney Opera 
House and Majestic, Iiumford; Dreamland, Livermore 
Falls; Bijou, Wilton; Rex, Norway; Savoy, South 
Paris; Opera House and Riverside, Bridgton; Colonial 
and Olympia, Portsmouth, N. H.; Albert and Princess, 
Berlin, N. H.; Johnson Opera House and Strand, Gar¬ 
diner; Augusta Opera House and Colonial, Augusta; 
Colonial, Winthrop. 

Rockland—Maine Theaters, Inc. (A. S. Black, px-es- 
ident and manager) : Park and Empire; Opera House, 


Warren; Lincolii Hall, Daixxariscotta; Opera House, 
Liberty and Columbia, Bath; Central, Biddefoi’d; Star 
and Scenic, Westbrook; Merimack Square, Lowell, 
Mass.; and a theater in Rutland, Vt. Black has other 
interests in towns outside of this territory. 

Eastport—Wilbor A. Shea: Acme; Eagle, Lubec; 
Saint Croix Opera House, Calais. 

Houlton—G. Beecher Churchill: Temple; Libby’s, 
Fort Fairfield; a new house at Lewiston, name un¬ 
known. 

Bangor—Graphic Theaters Co. (Charles Stern, 
manager): Graphic; Park, Dexter. 

Hallowell—Acme Theater Co. (J. M. Goodman, 
manager): Acme, Kennebunk; Bijou, Kennebunkport; 
Acme, Belgrade Lakes; Acme, Vinal Haven. 

There is an organization of six exhibitors in Aroos¬ 
took County who have a booking arrangement be¬ 
tween them. This organization so far is unnamed, 
but consists of the following: C. H. Seymour, Bijou, 
Houlton; J. J. Hone, Opera House. Presque Isle; R. L. 
Sukeforth, Park, Fort Fairfield; II. A. Flora, Powers, 
Caribou; Thomas Willett, Dreamland, Van Buren; and 
H. L. Jenkins, Scenic, Lunestone. 


Michigan 

Marquette—Delft Theaters, Inc., Opei’a House and 
Delft; Delft, Escanaba; Delft, Munising. 


Minnesota 

Minneapolis—Finkelstein & Ruben: (Twin City 
Trust Estate Amusement Co.), New Aster, New Gar¬ 
den, New Garidck, New Grand, New Lyric, New Palace, 
Strand, Calhoun, Lagoon, and New Lyndale. St. Paul 
—New Garrick, New Liberty, New Palace, New Majes¬ 
tic, New Princess, Gayety, Park, Faust, Verdi, Victoria, 
Alhambra and Gem. 

Minneapolis—H. P. Greene (Lake Amusement Co.), 
New Lake, East Lake, Lake, and Hamline at St. Paul. 

Winona—Rochester Theater Co. and Colonial Thea¬ 
ter Co (affiliated), Colonial and Garden, and Lawler, 
Rochester. 

Fargo, N. D.—Dan Chambei’lain (American Amuse¬ 
ment Co.), Garrick; Grand, Mankato; Grand, Fari¬ 
bault; Empress, Minneapolis. 

Virginia—Wm. J. Rezac, Lyric-Grand; Princess, 
Hibbing. 

Albert Lea—V. B. Balleau, Inc., Broadway, Idle 
Hour, Barrymore, Marshall, Palace, Waseca. 

Austin—Fergus Falls Picture Corp., Lyric and Cozy; 
Lyric and Bijou, Fergus Falls. 

St. Paul—Ohio Motion Pictures Corp. and Ameri¬ 
can Amusement Co. (affiliated), Venus, Garden, Pal¬ 
ace, Ohio, DeLuxe, Forest. 


Missouri 

Kansas City—Star, Ashland; Mozart, Broadmore, 
Emerald. 

Kansas City—Grubel: Elective at Joplin, St. Joe 
and Springfield. 

Kansas City—Newman: Newman, Royal and Regent. 

Boonville—Auditorium, Marshall. 

Caruthersville—Mrs. I. W. Rodgers: Liberty, Car- 
uthersville, and Criterion. Poplar Bluff. 

St. Louis—Skouras Bros.: Pageant, Lyi*ic, West 
End Lyric, Olympia. 

Celia & Tate: Columbia, Strand, Rialto, Grand 
Opera House. 

Wm. H. Young: Easton-Taylor, Euclid. 

W. O. Reeves: Maryland, 18th Street. 

George Plikos: Marquette, Criterion. 

Angelich Bros.: Rainbow, Variety. 



St. Louis—Skouras: West End, Lyric, Pageant and 
Olympia. 

R. A. Sterlein: Bridge, Fairy. 

Joe Mogler: Excello, Mogler. 

Wm. Sievers: New Grand Central, Central. 

Thomas James: Comet, Movie. 

Hector M. E. Pasmezoglu: Congress, New Delmar. 

Freund Bros.: Woodland, Cinderella. 

Harry Koplar: Pershing, Kings, Shenandoah, Lin- 
dell, Juniata, Montgomery, Lafayette, Gravois, Che¬ 
rokee, Maffit, Arco, Novelty, Melba, Grand-Florrisant 
and Royal. 

Brookfield—Sears & Joos: Theaters in Brookfield, 
Marshall, Boonville, Hale and McPherson, Ivans. 

New York 

New York City—Loew Theatrical Enter., Consoli¬ 
dated Amuse. Co., D. Y. Picker Enter., M. & S. Enter., 
United Booking Offices, Chas. Steiner Enter., Trio 
Amuse. Co., Flushing Motion Picture Corp., Rachmil, 
Warshauer & Rinzler, M. Goodman Enter., Yost Enter¬ 
prises, Wm. Fox Theatrical Enter., Walter Rosenberg 
Enter., Reiber & Shea, Robt. Riley Enter., Stern En¬ 
terprises, Eccleston Enterprises, Sheer Bros., Hecht & 
Gold, Bornstein & Osterman, Sidney Cohen Enter., 
Grob & Ivnoble, Chas. O’Reilly, Schwartz & Miller, 
Menschel Bros., Glynne & Ward, Chas. Goldreyer En¬ 
terprises, Sidney Ascher Enter., A. H. Schwartz, Elbee 
Corp. 

The Loew Circuit, New York City: American, 260 
West 48th St.; American Roof, 260 West 42d St.; Boule¬ 
vard, 1030 Southern Boulevard; Broadway, Broadway 
and Stockton St.; Burland, 895 Prospect Ave.; Burland 
Garden, 895 Prospect Ave.; Circle, Broadway and 60th 
St.; DeKalb, 1151 DeKalb Ave.; Delancey, Suffolk and 
Delancey Sts.; 86th St., 162 East 86th St.; 42d St., Lex¬ 
ington Ave. and 42d St.; Fulton, 1283 Fulton St.; Gree¬ 
ley Square, 6th Ave. and 30th St.; Lincoln Square, 1947 
Broadway; Metropolitan, 392 Fulton St.; National, Ber¬ 
gen and Westchester Aves.; New York, 1520 Broad¬ 
way; 116th St., 132 West 116th St.; Orpheum, 168 East 
87th St.; Palace, Douglas and E. N. Y. Ave.; Seventh 
Avenue, 7th Ave. and 124th St.; Victoria, 233 West 125th 
St.; Warwick, Jerome Ave.; Yorkville, 157 East 86th St.; 
Shubert, Monroe Ave.; Avenue B, Avenue B and 5th 
St.; Bijou, 26th Smith St.; New York Roof, 1520 Bway. 

New York: M. & S. Co., Odeon, New Law, M. & S., 
Hopkinson, Palace, Waco, New 14th, Sunshine, Ameri¬ 
can, Regun, Roebling, Crescent and Clinton. 

Fox Circuit: Academy of Music, Audubon, Crotona, 
Star, City, Comedy Japanese Garden, Nemo, Washing¬ 
ton, New York City; Bay Ridge, Bedford, Folly, Ja¬ 
maica, Ridgewood, Brooklyn; Washington, Detroit; 
American, Newark; American, Paterson; Liberty, Eliza¬ 
beth, N. J.; Terminal, Newark; New Britain, New Brit¬ 
ain; Springfield, Springfield; Strand, Plaza, Rivoli and 
Isis Denver. 

Charles O’Reilly—68th St. Playhouse, 68th St. and 
3d Ave.; Rex, 211 E. 67th S.t 

Astoria, L. I.—Robert Riley: Arena and Arcade, As¬ 
toria, and Elite, Sag Harbor. 

Rachmill, Warschauer and Rinzler—Sheffield, 308 
Sheffield Ave.; Penn, 621 Sutter Ave.; Cleveland, 2386 
Pitkin Ave.; Miller, 251 Saratoga Ave., all Brooklyn. 

Maurice Goodman—Wyckoff, 247 Wyckoff Ave.; Wil¬ 
loughby, 260 Knickerbocker Ave.; Broadway Lyceum, 
837 Broadway, and Imperial, 157 Irving Ave., all 
Brooklyn. 

William Yoebst—Amphion, 614 Ninth Ave.; Chelsea, 
312 Eighth Ave.; Superior, 443 Third Ave., and Royal, 
650 Tenth Ave. 

Glynne and Ward—Century, Robinson and Nostrand 
Ave., and Alhambra, Knickerbocker Ave. and Halsey 
St., Brooklyn. 

Schwartz and Miller—Oxford, 552 State St.; Westend, 
5128 New Utrecht Ave.; Garden, Richmond Hill, L. I. 

Sheer Brothers—Palace, Corona; Victoria, Elmhurst; 
Hyperion, Corona, and Colonial, Corona. 


Alfred Harstn—Regun, 60 West 116th St.; Bon Ton, 
125th St. and Third Ave.; Harlem, Fifth Ave., 110th St. 
and Fifth Ave. 

Charles Goldreyer—Concourse, Grand Concourse and 
Fordham Road: University, 186th St. and Webster Ave.; 
Fordham, 25 W. Fordham Road; Westchester, Mount 
Vernon. 

Charles Steiner Enterprises—Casino Playhouse, 144 
Second Ave.; American Movies, 238 East 3d St.; Sun¬ 
shine, Houston and Forsythe Sts.; New 14th 235 14th St. 

M. and S.—Palace, 133 Essex St.; Odeon, Clinton and 
Rivington Sts.; Clinton, Clinton and Delancey Sts.; De¬ 
lancey, 6 Delancey St.; New Law, 25 Second Ave.; Hop¬ 
kinson, Hopkinson and Pitkin Aves., Brooklyn; Waco, 
Rivington and Essex Sts.; Crescent, 1175 Boston Road. 

Suchman Brothers—Golden Rule, Third Ave., near 
171 st St., and King, 174th St. and Third Ave. 

E. C. Eccleston—Star, Islip; Novelty, Sayville; Your, 
Huntington; Fireman’s Hall, Westbury; National, 
Lyndhurst; Babylon, Babylon; Opera House, Smith- 
town; Comet, Belleport, and Liberty, Huntington. 

Walter Reade (Rosenberg)— Savoy, 34th St., near 
Broadway; Savoy and St. James, Asbury Park, N. J.; 
Broadway, Long Branch, N. J.; Trent, Trenton, N. J.; 
Taylor Opera House, Trenton, N. J.; Columbia, Hagers¬ 
town, N. J.; Park, Boston, Mass.; Hippodrome, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio; Coliseum, Akron, Ohio. 

Sydney Cohen—Empire, 161st St. and Westchester 
Ave.; McKinley Square, Boston Road and 169th St.; 
North Star, Fifth Ave. and 106th St.; Tremont, Webster 
Ave. and 178th; Bronx Grand, Westchester and Pros¬ 
pect Aves. 

Trio Amusement Co.—Symphony, Broadway and 95th 
St.; Adelphi, Broadway and 89th St. 

Consolidated Amusement Co.—72d Street Playhouse, 
346 E. 72d St.; Tiffany, 107 Tiffany St.; Times, 653 8th 
Ave.: Village, 115 8th Ave.; York, 189 8th Ave.; Arena, 
623 8th Ave.; Clermont, 1359 First Ave.; Drury Lane, 
615 Eighth Ave.; Ideal, 693 Eighth Ave.; Morningside, 
2139 Eighth Ave.; Movie. 1843 Third Ave.; Regent, 385 
Third Ave. 

David V. Picker Theatrical Enterprises—Spooner, 963 
Southern Boulevard; Victory, 156th St. and Third Ave., 
and Elsmere, Elsmere Place and Crotona Parkway. 

Simon N. Lazarus, 7129 Melrose Ave.-—Metropolis, 
142d St. and Third Ave.; Colonial, 147th and Willis Ave.; 
and Savoy, Asbury Park; Broadway, Long Branch. 

Flushing—Flushing Motion Picture Corp.: Flushing, 
56 Main St., Flushing, L: I.; Murray Hill, Broadway, 
Flushing, L. I.; Nassau, 173 Main St., Port Washing¬ 
ton, L. I.; Fulton, Main St., Hempstead, L. I.; Central, 
Greeenport. 

North Dakota 

Grand Forks—A. J. Ivavanagh, Grand; Opera House, 
Jamestown and Southern, Minneapolis, Minn. 

North Carolina 

Wilmington—R. M. Wells-D. M. Howard: Royal, 
Bijour, Grand. Victoria. Academy of Music. 

Canton—J. T. DuckworthsCantonion, Waynes- 
wood, Waynesville. 

Charlotte—R. D. Craver: Broadway; Rex, Winston 
Salem; Cravers Amusement Co.* Durham. 

Charlotte—Otto Haas: Ottoway and Ideal. 

Burlington—C. Cooley : Victory, Crystal and Groto. 

Winston Salem—C. J. McLane: Broadway, Pilot 
and Auditorium. 

Lumberton—H. H. Anderson: Pastime; Gem, Lar- 
enburg; Opera House, Hamlat. 

Hickory—J. F. Miller: Pastime and Hub. 

Durham—D. T. Crall: Orpheum; Palace, Peters¬ 
burg, Va.; Olympic and Imperial, Newport News, Va. 

Henderson—S. S. Stevenson: Princess, Liberty and 
Amtizu. 


Hobart Henley Productions 


will be distributed by 



“A Gay Old Dog,” from the story by 
Edna Ferder and adapted for the screen 
by Mr. Sidney Drew passed the fourteen 
members of the Pathe Film Committee 
and was given the highest possible rating. 

Responsible for many of the Rex 
Beach, Pauline Frederick and Mae 
Marsh successes. 


Author and Director of 
“PARENTAGE” 


In Preparation 
“THE GOD-PARENTS” 


All Henley productions to be personally 

directed by 


HOBART HENLEY 

























Rocky Mount—J. L. Arrington: Grand, Almo and 
Masonic Opera House. 

Greensboro—G. W. Pryor: Bijou, Isis, Piedmont. 

Nebraska 

Minden—C. G. Binderup Circuit. 

New Jersey. 

Bayonne: Leon Rosenblat: Lyceum and Plaza. 

Bayonne—Feiber & Shea: Opera House and Bijou, 
Bayonne; Opera House and Bijou, New Brunswick; 
Bijou, Orange. 

Newark—Jacob Fabian: Regent and Garden, Pater¬ 
son; Brandford, Newark. 

Proctor’s: Proctor’s, Newark; Proctor’s, Plainfield; 
Proctor’s, Jersey St., Broad St. Theater, Elizabeth. 

Joseph Stern: City, Bellevue, Plaza and National, 
Newark; Grand, Kearney; Lincoln, Bloomfield. 

Bornstein & Austerman: Criterion, Playhouse, Sce¬ 
nario, Palace and Grand. 

Newark—Bornstein and Osterman: Palace, and Play¬ 
house, Newark; Alpha, Belville; Grand, Newark; City, 
Irvington; Scenario and Criterion, Newark. 

Newark—C. Robinson: Halstead, E. Orange; Forrest 
Hill and Elliot, Newark. 

Newark—Joseph Stern Theatrical Enterprises: Sev¬ 
enth and Orange Sts.; Plaza, 400 Springfield Ave.; Belle- 
view, 80 Hellebille Ave.; National, 182 Belmont Ave.: 
Lincoln, Bloomfield Ave., Bloomfield; Empire, Bloom¬ 
field Ave., Bloomfield; Grand, 23 Kearney Ave., and 
Casino, 95 Kearney Ave., Kearney. 

Wonderland, 152d and Third Ave.; Hamilton, Hamilton 
Ave., Brooklyn; Oriole, 490 Henry St. 

Jersey City—Harry Brown: Lyric, Summit; Crescent, 
Ridgefield Park; Strand, Jersey City; Empire, Rahway. 

Jersey City—Mr. Grossman: Plaza, Jersey City; Em¬ 
pire, Bayonne. 

Jersey City—Mr. Dunbar: Princess, Regent and Audi¬ 
torium. 

Jersey City—Louis Blumenthal: National, Jersey City; 
Eureka, Hackensack. 

Jersey City—Keith’s: Keith’ sand Bijou Dream. 

Passaic—A. M. Taylor: Montauk and Playhouse. 

Pas§aic—L. Rosenthal: Rialto, Passaic; Bergen, New¬ 
ark; Park, E. Rutherford. 

Orange—Shepard & Cuff: Palace, Colonial and 
Lyceum. 

Asbury Park—Walter Rosenberg (Reade): St. James 

Paterson—Hecht and Gold: Garden, Passaic; Regent, 
Kearney; Lyric and Strand, Paterson. 

Paterson—Hecht & Gold & Hennessey: Majestic, 
Strand and Lyric, Paterson; Garden and City, Passaic; 
Liberty, Newark; Regent, Kearney; Capitol, Elizabeth. 

Feiber and Shea—Opera House, Bayonne; Opera 
House, New Brunswick; Bijou, New Brunswick; Bijou, 
Orange, N. J.; Park, Youngstown, Ohio; Colonial, Ak¬ 
ron, Ohio; Grand Opera House, Akron, Ohio; Park 
Opera House, Erie, Pa.; Grand Opera House, Canton, 
Ohio; Empire, Hoboken, N. J.; Majestic, Ashtabula, 
Ohio; Jefferson, Auburn, N. Y.; Opera House, James¬ 
town, N. Y. 

Atlantic City—Stanley Booking Co.: Virginia, Cort 
and Colonial, Atlantic City; Colonial and Plaza, Camden. 

Trenton—Hildinger & Lamonte: Strand, Park and 
Majestic, City Square, Bijou and Princess, Trenton; 
Strand, Lambertville. 

Union Hill—J. Squires: Fulton and Franklin, Union 
Hill; Rialto, Wilson and Jewel, West New York. 

Ohio 

Springfield—Gus Sun Amusement Co.: Fairbanks 
and Alhambra. 

Marietta—C. and M. Amusement Co.: Putman; 
Strand, Cambridge. 

Cincinnati—Ike Libson: Strand, Walnut, Family, 
Star and Bijou; Colonial, Columbus; Strand, Dayton; 
Strand, Louisville, Ky. 


Cincinnati—Wm. Gervis: Aragon No. 1, 2, 3 and 4. 

Cincinnati—George Kolb: Empire, Imperial and 
Woodward; Norwood, Norwood. 

Cincinnati—Henry Levy: Columbia, Liberty, Park 
(Northside). 

Oklahoma. 

Pawhuska—Albert Jackson: Jackson’s, Constantine. 

Oklahoma City—Jack Boland: Empress and Folly. 

Blackwell—M. C. Toothaker: Elsk and Libert. 

Enid—Moyer & McQuilkin: Rialto and Majestic. 

Tulsa—Mrs. M. R. Johnson: Wonderland and Royal. 

Tulsa—Mrs. L. T. Williams (colored): Dreamland, 
Tulsa; Dreamland, Okulgee; Dreamland, Muskogee. 

Ardmore—H. Lowenstein: Palace, Ardmore; Theater. 
Wirt. 

Woodward—W. H. Frame: Pastime, Woodward; 
Opera House, Moreland. 

Vinita—L. W. Brophy: Yale Theaters in Claremore, 
Vinita, Muskogee and McAlester. 

Picher—J. W. Cotter: Main St. and Liberty. 

Bixby—S. A. Campbell: Electric, Bixby; Majestic, 
Jenks. 

Sallisaw—E. B. Bugher: Wonderland Theaters in Sal- 
lisaw, Muldrow and Vian. 

Caldwell—N. N. King: Electric, Caldwell, Alvo, 
Medford. 

Caddo—H. C. Kuschke: Royal, Caddo; Garden, Sham¬ 
rock. 

Oregon 

Portland—Jensen & Von Herberg: Liberty, Colum¬ 
bia, Peoples, Star and Majestic; Liberty, Medford. 

Rainier—C. G. Vaughn: Grand; Peoples, Clatskanie; 
Globe, Kelsp, Wash. 

Albany—C. F. Hill: Rolfe and Globe, Albany; Ma¬ 
jestic and Antlers, Roseburg. 

Pennsylvania 

Pittsburgh—Rowland & Clark: Liberty, Regent, 
Belmar, Arsenal, Strand and Plaza; Rowland, Wilk- 
insburg; Regent, Beaver Falls. 

Pittsbudgh—Davis Theater Enterprises: Grand, Da¬ 
vis, Wm. Penn, Sheridan Square, Pershing, Wonder¬ 
land, Harris, Lyric and Temple; Strand, Morgantown, 
W. Va. 

Philadelphia.—Stanley Company of America, 1214 
Market St.: Stanley, Market above Sixteenth St.; Ar¬ 
cadia, Chestnut above Fifteenth St.; Regent, 1634 
Market St.; Palace, 1214 Market St.; Victoria, 913 
Market St.; Savoy, 1211 Market St.; Family, Market 
above Thirteenth St.; Princess, 1018 Market St.; 
333 Market St.; Ruby, Marshall and Market Sts.; 
Auditorium, 219 N. 8th St.; Great Northern, Broad 
and Erie Ave.; Imperial, 60th and Walnut Sts.; Globe, 
59th and Market Sts., W. Phila.; Rialto, Gtn. and 
Tulpehocken Sts., Germantown; Broad Street Casino, 
Broad and Erie Ave.; Empress, Manayunk, Phila.; 
Orient, 6249 Woodland Ave.; Paschall, 71st and 
Woodland Ave.; 58th St., 58th St. and Woodland 
Ave.; Darby, 9th and Main Sts., Darby; Alhambra, 
12th and Morris Sts.; Broadway, Broad and Snyder 
Ave.; Capitol, 7th and Market Sts.; Cross Keys, 60th 
and Market Sts.; Globe, Juniper and Market Sts.; 
Colonial, Gtn. Ave. and Chelten Ave.; Colonial, Cam¬ 
den ; Grand, Camden; Princess, Camden; Garrick, 
Norristown; Grand, Norristown; Globe, Atlantic City, 
N. J.; Colonial, Atlantic City, N. J. and Virginia, At¬ 
lantic City, N. J. 

Philadelphia—Stanley Booking Corp.: Stanley, Ar¬ 
cadia, Regent, Palace, Victoria, Savoy, Family, Prin¬ 
cess, Ruby, 333 Market St., Capitol, Auditorium, 
Great Northern, Imperial, Globe, Rialto, Broad St. 
Casino, Empress, Orient, Paschall, 58th St., Darby 
and Alhambra; Atlantic City, N. J.: Colonial and Vir¬ 
ginia; Camden, N. J.: Colonial, Grand and Princess; 
Norristown, Pa.: Garrick, Bijou and Grand. 


Katherine MacDonald Productions 

“The American Beauty” 

in a series of 

First National Attractions 



Paramount-Burlingham Travel Pictures 

Adventure travels 

through lands 

strange - unusual - beautiful 

Released through 



i FAMOUS PLAYERS "LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPH ZUKOR Pres. JESSE L.LASKY Vice Pres. CECIL B.DE MULE 

'QJEW YORK./ 



Controlled by 

Attractions Distributing Corporation 

B. P. FINEMAN, President 

1482 Broadway, New York City 












Philadelphia—F. G. Nixon-Nirdlinger (Freiliofer In¬ 
terests) : Strand, Coliseum, Cedar, Jumbo, Frankford, 
Pelham, Nixon, Rivoli, Belmont, Locust and West 
Allegheny; Dover, Del.: Opera House. 

Philadelphia—Stiefel Houses: Iris, Lafayette, Star, 
Grand, Jackson, Poplar, Fairmount, Pastime and 
Premier. 

Philadelphia—Green & Altman Houses: Park, Jef¬ 
ferson, Norris, Susquehanna, Aurora and Auditorium 
(Logan). 

Philadelphia—M. E. Comerford Enterprises: Majes¬ 
tic, Yictorial and Ideal, Carbondale; Regent, Manhat¬ 
tan, Bijou, Victoria, Orpheum and Strand, Scranton; 
Palace and Rialto, Providence; Park, Family, Jackson, 
Leader and Garden, West Scranton; Gem and Vic¬ 
tory, South Scranton; Hippodrome, Dreamland, Ro¬ 
man and Strand, Pittston; Savoy, Strand, Alhambra 
Bijou and Metropolitan, Wilkes-Barre; Strand, Sun- 
bury; Strand and Regent, Geneva, N. Y.; Majestic, 
Wilkes-Barre. 

Scranton—S. Z. Poli Enterprises: Poli, Scranton, 
and Poli, Wilkes-Barre. 

Wilmer & Vincent Theaters Co. (Part ownership 
with Sablosky & McGuirk) : Opera House and Colonial, 
Easton; Orpheum, Allentown; Hippodrome, Reading; 
Colonial, Orpheum and Victoria, Harrisburg. 

L. J. Chamberlain Enterprises: Victoria, Sliamokin; 
Victoria, Sunbury; Victoria, Tamaqua; Victoria, 
Bloomsburg; Victoria and Val Theatorium, Mt. Carmel. 

George Bennethum Houses: Hippodrome and Victor, 
Allentown; Pictureland, Reading; Hippodrome and 
Lyric, Pottstown; Hippodrome and Scenic, York; Pal¬ 
ace, Coatesville; Grand Opera House, Cambridge, Md. 

Rhode Island 

Providence—Empire, Aldee, Victory, Providence. 

Pawtucket—Bijou, Music Hall, Scenic, and Star. 

Texas 

Texas Exhibitors Circuit: 15 or 20 houses in small 
towns. 

Dallas—E. H. Hulsey Circuit: Dallas, Waco, Hous¬ 
ton, Ft. Worth, Galveston. (In association with W. J. 
Lytle, San Antonio, Tom Boland, Oklahoma City affili¬ 
ating with Saenger Circuit, New Orleans). 

Dallas—Hul'sey Circuit: Old Mill, Queen, Hippo¬ 
drome, Dallas; Queen, Zoe, Houston; Grand, Galves¬ 
ton; Hippodrome, Washington, Waco; Hippodrome, 
Strand, Palace, Fort Worth; Crescent, Temple, Erie; 
Liberty, Higo, Okla; Best, Hillsboro; Mission, Queen, 
Abiline; R and R, San Angelo; R and R, Big Springs. 

Dallas—Lynch Circuit: Liberty, Houston; Liberty, 
Rex, Queen, Waco; Crystal, Dallas; Opera House, 
Temple, Greenville; Star, Denison; Palace, Little Rock. 

Amarillo—Dye Ford and Rogers Circuit; Olympic, 
Amarillo; Olympic, Plainview; New Theater, Wichita 
Falls; Amusu, Canyon City. 

South Dakota 

Aberdeen—McCarthy Bros., Lyric, Rialto and Or¬ 
pheum; Lyric, Watertown; Orpheum, Fargo, N. D.; 
Orpheum, Grand Forks, N. D. 

« 

• South Carolina 

Gaffney—R. G. Hill: Strand; Rialto, Union. 

Greenville—Curtis & McBee: Bijou and Liberty. 

Anderson—Phelp Sassen: Bijou; Pastime, Belton. 

Columbia—Geo. C. Warner: Ideal, Broadway and 
Rialto. 

Darlington—Geo. C. Hendrickson: Dreamland; New, 
Lake City. 

Sumter—S. E. Miller: Rex, Lyric and Lux. 

Tennessee 

Bristol—M. C. King: Columbia and Eagles. 


Vermont. 

Rutland — Alfred S. Black: Strand, Rutland; Princess, 
Brattleboro; Strand, Randolph, and others. 

Grob and Knoble —U. S. Theatre, 2711 Webster Ave.; 
Manhattan, 109th St. and Manhattan Ave. 

Virginia 

Richmond—Jake Wells Enterprises; houses in Rich¬ 
mond, Norfolk, and the South. 

Petersburg—E. T. Crall: Palace; Olympic and 
Imperial, Newport News. 

Danville—G. W. Pryor: Majestic, Broadway and 
Bijou; Broadway, Richmond. 

West Virginia 

Charleston—T. L. Kearse: Strand, Burlew, Colonial, 
Alhambra and Hippodrome; Civic Center, Nitro. 

Wisconsin 

La Crosse—La Crosse Theater Co., Majestic, La 
Crosse and Bijou. 

La Crosse—A. J. Cooper, Strand, Casino and Dome. 

Milwaukee—Saxe Amusement Enterprises, Alham¬ 
bra, Princess, Theatorium, Miller and Modjeska. 

Milwaukee—J. H. Silliman, Liberty, Downer, Astor, 
Miramar and Murray. 

Milwaukee—Finn & Heimann, Monroe Bldg., Chi¬ 
cago, New Strand, Fuller Opera House and Orpheum, 
all in Madison. Orpheum, Green Bay. 

Washington 

Anderson—Meridian Amusement Co.: Starland and 
Meridian; Washington, Richmond. 

Bedford—H. E. McCarrel: Grand; Orpheum, Mitch¬ 
ell; Alhambra and Crystal, Orleans; Washington, 
Salem. 

Huntington—Hyman Bros.: Lyric, Orpheum and 
Opera House. 

Vader—Richard Charles: Liberty ; Dreamland, Cas¬ 
tle Rock; Liberty, Winlock; Movie, Napavine. 

Seattle—Northwest Exhibitors’ Circuit, James Q. 
Clemmer of Seattle, president: James Q. Clemmer, 
Clemmer Theater, Seattle, Wash.; J. C. Stille, Mgr., 
Peoples Amusement Co., Peoples and Star Theaters, 
Portland, Ore.; H. T. Moore, Rialto and Co-Broadway 
Theaters, Everett, Wash.; Clemmer and Lambach, 
Clemmer and Columbia Theaters, Spokane, Wash.; 
Frank T. Bailey, American Theater, Butte, Mont.; F. 
B. Walton, American Theater, Bellingham, Wash.; 
McKee and Swanson, Everett, Orpheum, Princess, Star 
and Broadway Theaters, Everett, Wash.; A. W. Eiler, 
American Theater, Walla Walla, Wash.; Frederick 
Mei’cy, Mercy Amusement Co., Majestic, Liberty and 
Empire Theaters, Yakima, Wash.; J. D. Straus, Lib¬ 
erty Theater, Astoria, Ore.; E. C. O’Keefe, Regent 
Theater, Billings, Mont.; Wm. G. Ripley, Western 
Circuit Amusement Co., Bijou and Rex Theaters, 
Aberdeen, Wash.; B. W. Bickert, Majestic Amusement 
Co.!, Majestic, Strand and Empress Theater, Boise, 
Idaho; Majestic and Orpheum Theaters, Nampa, Idaho; 
Empress Theater, Meridian, Idaho; F. D. Bligh, Ye 
Liberty Theater, Salem, Ore.; W. A. Simons, Liberty 
Theaters, Missoula, Mont.; Coeur d’Alene, Idaho; Wal¬ 
lace, Idaho; Kellogg, Idaho; Mullan, Idaho; It. 1). 
Can-others, Carrothers and Archibald, Orpheum. Prin¬ 
cess and Olympic Theaters, Pocatello, Idaho; W. J. 
Hartwig, Antlers Theater, Helena, Mont., Star Thea¬ 
ter, Hamilton, Mont., Mission Theater, Fort Benton, 
Mont.; C. F. Hill, Hill and Hudson, Globe and Itolfe 
Theaters, Albany, Ore.; Rialto Theater, Medford, 
Ore.; Antlers Theater, Roseburg, Ore.; J. A. McGill, 
U. S. A. Theater, Liberty and American Theaters, 
Vancouver, Wash.; W. H. Coble, Liberty Theater, 
Bend, Ore.; E. A. Zabel, Olympia Amusement Co., 
Ray and Rex Theaters, Olympia, Wash.; O. E. 
Schmidt, Gem Theater, Bozeman, Mont.; Henry New¬ 
man, Arcade and Liberty Theaters, Hoquiam, Wash.; 
John Rantz, Osran Amusement Co., Rialto, Dream and 










“The Gamblers’' 

“The Man Who Won” 
“In Honor’s Web” 

“Out of the Dark” 

“The King of Diamonds” 








Rex Theaters, Bremerton, Wash.; A. B. Hager, Rex 
Theater, Idaho Falls, Idaho; A. H. Hilton, Paramount 
Theater, Lewiston, Idaho; J. P. Cotter, Cotter Amuse¬ 
ment Co., Orpheum, Empire, Grand and Baker Thea¬ 
ters, Baker, Ore.; E. P. White, Strand Theater, Liv¬ 
ingston, Mont.; Robert Marsden, Jr., Noble and Or¬ 
pheum Theaters, Marshfield, Ore.; Charles Schram, 
Grand Theater, Oregon City, Ore.; W. W. Kastner, 
Gem and Wenatchee Theaters, Wenatchee, Wash.; C. 
G. Matlock, Pendleton Amusement Co., Alta, Arcade, 
Cosy and Pastime Theaters. Dendleton, Ore.; Samuel 
Whiteside, Majestic Theater, Corvallis, Ore.; George 
Reisner, Arcade and Lyric Theaters, Raymond, Wash.; 
Lyric Theater, South Bend, Wash.; Wm. G. Hyde, Lib¬ 
erty Theater, Miles City, Mont.; O. W. Lambert, Or¬ 
pheum Theater, Roundup, Mont.; J. D. Rice, Dream 
Theater, Chehalis, Wash.; A. Bettingen, Grand and 
Empress Theaters, The Dallas, Ore.; J. E. Farrell, Co¬ 
lonial and Isis Theaters. Ellensburg, Wash.; R. T. Hurtt 
Hurtt Theater, Caldwell, Idaho; O. W. Newton, Lib¬ 
erty Theater, Hillyard, Wash.; A. C. Gordon, Star 
Theater, Weiser, Idaho; Dennis M. Hull, Liberty Thea¬ 


ter, North Bend, Ore.; N. E. Leigh, Parma Circuit, 
Parma, Idaho; Smith and Nelson, Rose and Bungalow 
Theaters, Colfax, Wash.; Thos. E. Vallencey, Isis 
Theater, Glendive, Mont.; W. B. Hartwig, Hartwig 
Theater, Dillon, Mont.; E. J. Reynolds, Liberty and 
Empire Theaters, Pasco, Wash.; A. S. Kolstadt, Lib¬ 
erty Theater, Hood River, Ore.; O. Phelps, Liberty 
Theater, Hillsboro, Ore.; E. C. Smith, American and 
Dreamland Theaters, Dayton, Wash.; C. M. Dunn, 
Liberty Theaters, Cle Elum, Wash., Roslyn, Wash.; 
E. G. Abbott, Dream Theater, Sedro Wooley, Wash.; 
C. D. Bucknam, Ideal Theater, Emmett, Idaho; Dor¬ 
othy Jacquish, Dreamland Theater, Ontario, Ore.; C. 
Hendricks, Jr., Weaver Theater, Mountain Home, 
Idaho; B. D. Brigham, Empire Theater, Tekoa, Wash.; 
H. M. Johnson, Lois Theater, Toppenish, Wash.; R. 
N. Barnett, American Theater, Sunnyside, Wash.; 
Geo. Stephenson, Grand and Theatorium Theaters, 
Pullman, Wash.; M. Kenworthy, Kenworthy Theater, 
Moscow, Idaho; W. H. Wheeler, Lyric Theater, Havre, 
Mont.; Striker and McDaniel, Orpheum and Princess 
Theaters, Kalispell, Mont., and John B. Ritch, Myrtle 
Theater, Lewiston, Mont. 


First Run Houses 


(Due to the many rapid changes in the industry this 
list cannot be absolutely accurate.) 


ALABAMA 

Strand. 

Rialto. 

Loew’s Bijou. 

Empress . 

ARKANSAS 

Palace . 

Palace. 

CALIFORNIA 

T. & D. 

Sterling . 

Superba . 

Clune’s Broadway. 

Tally’s Broadway. 

Grauman’s. 

Alhambra. 

California. 

Rialto . 

Kinema . 

T. & D. 

Strand. 

Tivoli . 

Portola . 

Imperial . 

Plaza . 

T. & D. 

T. & D. 

COLORADO 

American. 

Princess . 

Rialto . 

Wm. Fox Rivoli. 

Wm. Fox Isis. 

CONNECTICUT 

Rialto . 

Palace . 

Olympia . 

Hyperion .■ 

Strand . 

DELAWARE 

Victoria. 

Majestic. 

FLORIDA 

Strand . 

Grand . 


. . Birmingham 
.. Birmingham 
. . Birmingham 
.Mobile 

.Helena 

.. . Little Rock 

.Berkeley 

.Greeley 

..Los Angeles 
..Los Angeles 
..Los Angeles 
. .Los Angeles 
..Los Angeles 
..Los Angeles 
..Los Angeles 
.. Los Angeles 
.. . Sacramento 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
San Francisco 
.... San Diego 

.Stockton 

.. .Watsonville 

.Denver 

.Denver 

.Denver 

.Denver 

.Denver 

. .New Haven 
. .New Haven 
. .New Haven 
. .New Haven 
.. . . Waterbury 

, . . Wilmington 
.. . Wilmington 

.Tampa 

.Tampa 


Imperial . 

Arcade . 

Casino . 

Jefferson . 

Isis . 

GEORGIA 

Strand . 

Lowe’s Grand. 

Well’s Forsyth. 

Well’s Strand. 

Arcadia. 

Odeon .. 


. .Jacksonville 
. .Jacksonville 
. .Jacksonville 
St. Augustine 
.... Pensacola 

.Augusta 

.Atlanta 

.Atlanta 

.Atlanta 

....Savannah 
. ...Savannah 


ILLINOIS 


Orpheum .Chicago 

Randolph .Chicago 

Ziegfield .Chicago 

Reviera .Chicago 

Pershing. Chicago 

Lake Side.Chicago 

Rose . Chicago 

Alcazar.Chicago 

Bijou Dream.Chicago 

Castle.Chicago 

Covent Garden.Chicago 

(All Lubliner & Trinz and Ascher Bros, houses 

play 1, 2 and 3 day runs.).Chicago 

Orpheum. Galesburg 

Hippodrome.Alton 

Fox.Aurora 

Mirror.Moline 

Spencer Square.Rock Island 

Apollo. Peoria 

Erbers.Quincy 

Gaiety . Springfield 

Lyric .Springfield 

Vaudette .Springfield 


INDIANA 

American. 

Liberty. 

Circle. 

Colonial. 

Alhambra. 

Lyric . 

Rialto . 

Auditorium. 

Orpheum . 

Jefferson . 

Murray . 


Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
. Indianapolis 
.Indianapolis 
. Indianapolis 
. Indianapolis 
. Indianapolis 
.South Bend 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
.. .Richmond 




















































































Albert Capellani Productions, Inc. 



Harry Cahane, 

Treasurer. 

Released through Pathe 

Suite 809, 1457 Broadway, New York 




















IOWA 

Palace .:.Des Moines 

Rialto.Des Moines 

Casino .Des Moines 

Garden .Des Moines 

Strand.Cedar Rapids 

Palace.Cedar Rapids 

Isis.Cedar Rapids 

Hippodrome.Keokuk 

Grand .Keokuk 

Princess .Sioux City 

Rex.Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Electric.Kansas City 

KENTUCKY 

Alamo .Louisville 

Keith’s Strand.Louisville 

Majestic .Louisville 

Olympia .Louisville 

Colonial.Newport 

MAINE 

Empire .Lewiston 

Strand . i .Lewiston 

MARYLAND 

Parkway .Baltimore 

Hippodrome .Baltimore 

Empire .Cumberland 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Bijou..'.Fall River 

Crown .Lowell 

Merrimac .'.Lowell 

Gordon’s.Cambridge 

Modern .Boston 

Park.Boston 

Globe.Boston 

MICHIGAN 

Miles.Detroit 

Liberty . Detroit 

Adams...Detroit 

Wm. Fox Washington.Detroit 

Broadway Strand.Detroit 

Madison .Detroit 

Regent .Detroit 

Regent.Battle Creek 

Garden.Battle Creek 

Strand .Battle Creek 

Majestic Garden.Grand Rapids 

Starland.Grand Rapids 

MINNESOTA 

Lyceum.Duluth 

Lyric .Duluth 

Rex.Duluth 

Strand ..Duluth 

New Unique.Minneapolis 

Lyric .Minneapolis 

Garrick .Minneapolis 

Palace .Minneapolis 

Strand .Minneapolis 

New Princess.St. Paul 

Blue Mouse.St. Paul 

New Liberty.St. Paul 

New Garrick.St. Paul 

MONTANA 

Palace.Great Falls 

Sexton .Great Falls 

Grand .Great Falls 

Athens .Great Falls 

Ansonia.Anaconda 

American.Butte 

Liberty.Butte 

MISSOURI 

Doric.Kansas City 

Newman’s .Kansas City 

12th St.Kansas City 

Electric.St. Joseph 


New Grand Central. 

Kings . 

Pershing . 

Rialto . 

Electric . 

Electric . 

NEBRASKA 

Garden . 

Amuse. 

Strand .... 

Rialto . 

Lyda . 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Star . 

Strand . 

Crown. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Broadway. 

Princess ..'. 

Victoria . 

Imperial . 

Broadway . 

Fays . 

Star . 

Imperial.. 

Bijou .... .. 

Fays .*. 

NEW JERSEY 

Princess. 

Lyric . 

Grand . 

Criterion. 

Lyric . 

U. S. 

Ideal . 

Pastime .. 

Lincoln . 

Birginia . 

Wm. Fox American. 

U. S. 

Strand . 

Colonial. 

Taylor. 

Strand .. 

State St. Theater. 

Rialto . 

Montauk . 

Garden . 

Playhouse . 

NEW YORK 

Majestic . 

Leland.. 

Strand. 

Colonial . 

Strand. 

Strand . 

Hippodrome . 

Capitol. 

Rivoli . 

Broadway . 

Rialto. 

Strand . 

Gordon . 

Fays. 

Regent . 

Strand . 

Hamilton . 

OHIO 

Columbia. 

Majestic. 

Loew’s Dayton. 

Loew’s Valentine. 

Temple ... 

Princess . 

Majestic. 

Sun’s . 


.St. Louis 

.St. Louis 

.St. Louis 

.St. Louis 

.Joplin 

.Springfield 

.Omaha 

.Omaha 

.Omaha 

.Omaha 

.. Grand Island 

.... Manchester 
.... Manchester 
.... Manchester 

Winston-Salem 

.Asheville 

.. .Wilmington 

.Charlotte 

.Charlotte 

.... Providence 

.Pawtucket 

.Pawtucket 

.Pawtucket 

.Pawtucket 

.Camden 

.Camden 

.Camden 

. .Atlantic City 

.Hoboken 

.Hoboken 

.Hoboken 

....Union Hill 
... .Union Hill 

.Paterson 

.Paterson 

.Paterson 

.Paterson 

.Paterson 

.Trenton 

.Trenton 

..Trenton 

.Trenton 

.Passaic 

.Passaic 

.Passaic 

.Albany 

.Albany 

.Albany 

.Albany 

.Brooklyn 

.Buffalo 

.Buffalo 

.. .. New York 
.. . .New York 
... .New York 
... .New York 
. ... New York 

.Rochester 

.Rochester 

.Rochester 

.Syracuse 

.Yonkers 

.Dayton 

.Dayton 

.Dayton 

.Toledo 

.Toledo 

.Toledo 

.... Springfield 
... .Springfield 










































































































































THOMAS SANTSCHI 


Lead* 


Current Releases: 


SHADOWS’’ “HER KINGDOM OF DREAMS 

THE HELL CAT’’ “THE GARDEN OF ALLAH’’ 

“THE CITY OF PURPLE DREAMS” 


Personal Representatives 

WILLIS AND INGLIS, Los Angeles, California 




















OKLAHOMA 


Empress ... 

Liberty .... 
Peoples .... 
Majestic ... 

Alleganey .. 
Regent .... 
Hippodrome 

Boyer . 

Olympic ... 

Strand . 

Park . 

Stanley 
Victoria ... 
Olympia ... 
Alhambra .. 

Grand . 

Lyceum ... 
Regent .... 
Belmar .... 
Strand . 

Strand. 

Strand . 

Tudor . 

Saenger. 

Seanger .. .. 
Beacon .... 
Olympia ... 

Strand. 

Olympia 

Royal . 

New Park.. 
Strand. 

Broadway . 
Ideal . 

Princess 
Colonial ... 

Majestic ... 

Rex . 

Elite . 

Strand .... 

Rialto. 

Alcazar ... 

Hippodrome 

Queen . 

Old Mill... 

Rex. 

Victor . 

Isis. 

Zoe . 

Liberty. 


Oklahoma City 

OREGON 

.Portland 

.Portland 

.Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

.Alleganey 

.Allentown 

.Allentown 

.Altoona 

.Altoona 

.Altoona 

.Johnstown 

.Philadelphia 

. Philadelphia 

.Pittsburg 

. Pittsburg 

.Pittsburg 

.Pittsburg 

.Pittsburg 

.Pittsburg 

.Scranton 

RHODE ISLAND 

.Providence 

.New Orleans 

.New Orleans 

.Shreve Port 

.Alexandria 

.Boston 

.Boston 

.Lynn 

. Lynn 

.Worcester 

.Worcester 

.Worcester 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

.Columbia 

.Columbia 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

.Sioux Falls 

.Sioux Falls 

TENNESSEE 

.Memphis 

.Nashville 

.Nashville 

.Nashville 

.Chattanooga 

.Chattanooga 

TEXAS 

.Dallas 

.Dallas 

.Dallas 

.Galveston 

.Fort Worth 

.Fort Worth 

.Houston 

.Houston 


Queen ... 
Empire .. 
Empress 
Grand ... 
Alhambra 


... .Houston 
... .Houston 
San Antonio 
San Antonio 
.El Paso 


Paramount-Empress 

American . 

Liberty . 

Strong . 

Majestic . 

Weil’s . 

Granly. 

Strand . 

American .. 

Colonial . 

Victor . 

Isis. 

Broadway. 

Odeon . 


UTAH 


VERMONT 


VIRGINIA 


Salt Lake City 
Salt Lake City 
Salt Lake City 

.... Burlington 
.... Burlington 

.Norfolk 

.Norfolk 

.Norfolk 

.Norfolk 

.Richmond 

.Richmond 

.... Richhmond 

.Richmond 

.Richmond 


WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Lyric .Washington 

Crandall’s Knickerbocker.Washington 

Crandall’s Savoy.Washington 

Crandall’s Metropolitan...Washington 

Elite .Washington 

Strand ..-.Washington 

Moore’s Garden.Washington 

Rialto.Washington 

WASHINGTON 

Coliseum .Seattle 

Liberty .Seattle 

Rex .Seattle 

Clemmer .Seattle 

Strand .Seattle 

Liberty.Spokane 

Clemmer .Spokane 

Rialto.Tacoma 

Liberty .Tacoma 

WISCONSIN 

Butterfly .Milwaukee 

Palace.Milwaukee 

Merrill .Milwaukee 

Alhambra .Milwaukee 

Princess.Milwaukee 

Strand .Milwaukee 

Grand .Madison 

Majestic .Beloit 

AUSTRALIA 

Crystal Palace.Sidney 

CANADA 

Family .Ottawa 

Strand.'..Toronto 

Francois.Ottawa 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Rex.Vancouver 


The M. P. D. A. 

By Ashley Miller, Secretary 

The Motion Picture Directors Association is a fra¬ 
ternal order composed of the most progressive men 
engaged in making pictures. It is not a business or¬ 
ganization. It is not a union. Its purpose is to better 
the product of the whole industry by fostering the 
highest ideals among its members. A list of the latter 
includes most of the prominent and successful directors 
in the field today. 

Two lodges are centers of activity; one in Los 
Angeles, (the parent), and one in New York. Through 
them the Association is quietly but inevitable becom¬ 
ing a potent factor in production everywhere, because 


it is the only organization which provides for direct, 
personal discussion of the things that make for pro¬ 
gress. 

The spirit of brotherhood and cooperation which 
animates this body of capable, efficient idealists not 
only shuts out petty jealousies and the monopoly of 
ideas but promotes their circulation for the general 
good. 

Meetings of the two lodges are a rearing house for 
discussion of new methods, of business and art prob¬ 
lems, of ways and means and for sifting the wheat 
of value from the chaff of “bunk” in production. 

As the industry is now organized the director car¬ 
ries the greatest measure of responsibility ror its out¬ 
put. Authors of the higher order are not technically 
qualified to do much more than furnish the basis for a 







































































































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picture. The detail of its transference to the screen 
is unknown to them. And so, even with a good 
scenario writer, of which there is a very limited num¬ 
ber, the director must carry almost the whole of the 
load. 

These men generally respect their work and each 
other. They believe in the screen as a potent world 
force and while quite conscious that it often falls far 
behind its mighty possibilities, hold a steady faith in 
its general trend upward, a trend which they individu¬ 
ally and collectively seek to foster. 

Though an association of the most prosperous and 
independent workers in the entire industry, the M. P. 
D. A. does little talking for public effect. Its work 
is done quietly, seriously and yet with an enthusiasm 
that portends a great and far-reaching influence on 
the future of the whole industry. 

M. P. D. A. 

List of members and addresses of Motion Picture 
Directors Association, New York: 

Adolfi, John G., 

Hotel Iroquois, 49 W. 44th St. 

August, Edwin, 

Friars Club, 110 W. 46th St. 

Buel, Keenan, 

Wm. Fox, 126 W. 46th St. 

Archainbauld, Geo., 

c/o Chautard, 790 Riverside Drive 
Chautard, Emile, 

790 Riverside Drive 
Crane, Frank J., 

c/o Florence Reed, United Picture Theatres 
Dawley, J. Searle, 

215 W. 51st St. 

Edwards, J. Gordon, 

Fox Film Corp., 126 W. 46th St. 

Eagle, Oscar, 

Lambs Club, 12S W. 44th St. 

Fitzmaurice, Geo., 

Lambs Club, 128 W. 44th St. 

Gasnier, Louis J., 

3847 Hudson Blvd., North Bergen, N. J. 
Lladdock, Wm. F., 

1570 E. 15th St., Brooklyn 
Harvey, John J., 

107 E. 31st St. 

Henley, Hobart, 

Estees Studio, 361 W. 125th St. 

Irving, George, 

Bayside, L. I. 

Ince, Ralph, 

Selznick Pictures, 729—7th Ave. 

Knoles, Harley, 

490 Riverside Drive 
Lund, O. A. C., 

Green Room Club, 139 W. 47th St. 

Middleton, Edwin, 

Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Miller. Ashley, 

4 W. 92nd St. 

Miller, Charles, 

500 West End Ave. 

Olcott, Sidney, 

Perret, Leonce, 

362 Riverside Drive 
Robertson, John S., 

138 West 56th St. 

Scardon, Paul, 

Seitz, Geo. B., 

134th St. and Parfl Ave. 

Simpson, E. M., 

2 Rector St. 

Terriss, Tom, 

Vitagraph, Brooklyn 
Thompson, Fred, 

Friars Club 
Van, Wally, 

312 Westminster Rd., Brooklyn 


Vincent, James, 

215 W. 51st St. 

Vale, Travers, 

235 Cliff Ave., Pelham, N. Y. 

Vekroff, Perry, 

511 W. 143rd St. 

Walsh, R. A., 

141 W. 95th St. 

William, C. Jay, 

102 Riverside Drive 
Wright, Fred R., 

Friars Club 
Brooke, Van Dyke, 

Green Room Club, 139. W. 47th St. 
Dillon, Edward 

Friars Club 
Giblyn, Charles, 

112 Riverside Drive 
Henderson, Dell, 

Hotel Claridge, Broadway & 44th St. 
Hunt, Jay, 

706 Riverside Drive 
King, Burton, 

215 W. 91st St. 

Webb, Kenneth, 

255 W. lOSth St. 


Lloyd, Frank, 

Melford. Geo., 

Webb, Kenneth 

Famous Players, 130 W. 56th St. 


Van Dyke, Brooke 
Edwards, Walter 
Carroll, Fleming 
Giblyn, Charles 
Henderson, Dell 
Hunt, Jay 
McGill, LawrenceB. 
Millarde, Harry 
Miller, Ashley 
Morgan, George 


O’Brien, John 
Sargent, George L. 
Taylor, S E. V. 
Vignola, Robert G. 
Wright, Fred E. 
Williams, Jay C. 
Young, James 
Withey, Chet 
Neil, Roy 
Ruggles, Wesley 


M. P. D. A., HO' 
Los 

Roscoe G. Arbuckle 
Reginald Barker 
Wm. Bertram 
Frank Borzage 
Edwin Carewe 
Lloyd B. Carleton 
Louis Wm. Chaudet 
E. F. Cline 
Donald W. Crisp 
Joseph DeGrasse 
Wm. Duncan 
Francis Ford 
Louis J. Gasnier 
Douglas Gerrard' 

Thomas N. Heffron 
E. Mason Hopper 
Lloyd Ingraham 
Fred A. Kelsey 
David Kirkland 
Capt. O. H. Swim 
Frank Lloyd 
Murdock J. MacQuarrie 
George Melford 
Stuart Payton 
Lynn F. Reynolds 
Victor Schertzinger 
George A. Siegman 
Phillips Smalley 
Wm. Desmond Tajdor 
Harry Beaumont 
Wm. Beau dine 

(Where addresses are 
tors may be reached at 
West 55th Street, or the 
geles.) 


ALEXANDRIA 
Angeles 

John G. Blystone 
Colin Campbell 
Al. E. Christie 
Roy Clements 
Jack Conway 
Wm. Robt. Daly 
J. F. Dillon 
Fred Fishbach 
Chas. K. French 
James Gordon 
Victor Herman 
Allen J. Holubar 
John C. Ince 
Jacques Jaccard 
Henry King 
Ed. J. LeSaint 
Norval MacGregor 
George Marshall 
Henry W. Otto 
Francis J. Powers 
Thomas Ricketts 
E. Scott Sidney 
Edward Sloman 
Richard Stanton 
Maurice Tourneur 
Ernest Ward 
Ben Wilson 
Wm. Worthington 
Raymond B. West 
Wallace Worsley 

not otherwise given, Direc- 
Jew York headquarters, 234 
Hotel Alexandria, Los An- 



The A, D. A. Boys 


The Assistant Directors Association, which was 
formed in Los Angeles almost a year ago, was the 
brain child of the leading members of the motion pic¬ 
ture profession, and through their untiring efforts, 
their dream has at last come true. 

They have their own club rooms, with a reference 
library, and they meet the first and last Friday of 
the month. 


Joe McDonough 
Robert McGowan 
Richard Oliphant 
Dana Ong 
James O. Shea 
Mortimer Peebles 
Frank Richardson 
Fred Robinson 
Arthur Rose 
A1 Russell 
Harry Schenck 
Leigh Smith 


hid Sowders 
Chas. Stallings 
Herbert Sutch 
Norman Taroug" 
Harry Tenbrook 
Frank Thorne 
Ernest Traxler 
Fred Tyler 
Tom Walsh 
Allan Watt 
George Webster 
Mac Wright 


The members: Western Electric Co. Industrials. 


Ivan Abramson 

Park Frame 

Dave Allen 

Frank Gerehity 

Alexander Alt 

Mark Goldaine 

Scott Beal 

Alfred E. Green 

Chester Bennett 

Rex Hodge 

George Bertholon 

Dave Howard 

Harry Burns 

Elliott Howe 

James Clemmens 

Lou Howland 

Buck Counors 

Bert King 

William Crinley 

Eddie Laemmlle 

Fred Croft 

Ward Lascalle 

George Crone 

Jack Laver 

William Dagwell 

Irving Luddy 

Douglas Dawson 

Roy Marshall 

Walter De Courcey 

Ray Meeker 

Eugene I)e Rue 

Claude H. Mitchell 

William Dyer 

Martin Murphy 

Reaves Eason 

iHenry Murray 

Arthur Flavin 

Joe McCloskey 


“The Education of Mrs. Drudge”—showing the use- 
of an electric washing machine, solving one of the 
disagreeable problems of housekeeping. One reel, 15 
minutes. 

“A Square Deal for His Wife”—a comedy drama, 
picturing the straightening out of a serious domestic 
tangle through the installation of a complete outfit of 
electrical household appliances. Two reels, 28 minutes. 

“Inside the Big Fence”—welfare picture, featuring 
the advantages of working in a modern factory turn¬ 
ing out electrical equipment. Two reels, 25 minutes. 

“Forging the Links of Fellowship”—manufacturing 
picture, showing interesting phases of modern factory 
processes. Two reels, 27 minutes. 

“Telephone Inventors of Today”—picturing many 
of the most interesting phases of electrical invention, 
including the handling of high tension currents, oper¬ 
ation of the radio telephone, the public speaking tele¬ 
phone, etc. Three reels, 38 minutes. 



Colin Campbell 

DIRECTED 

Katherine MacDonald 

in 

“THE BEAUTY MARKET” — “THE THUNDERBOLT” 

FIRST NATIONAL RELEASE 


Address WID’S DAILY, Hollywood, Calif. 


Now directing Dustin Farnum. Title ot 
present production to be announced shortly 




What of the Serial? 

How distributors and producers regard the outlook relative to this phase of production. 


Anticipates Overproduction 

Serials will “go big” but there will be an overpro¬ 
duction of them. This means that the only serials 
that will get good money will be the very best ones. 
Serials will be better and higher class. They will 
have to be, because they are going into big theaters 
which hitherto thought serials were not the proper 
diet for their patrons. These same theaters, how¬ 
ever, have suddenly discovered that the smaller thea¬ 
ter owners were wiser than they were, because there 
is no better business builder or business holder than a 
rattling good serial. 

CARL LAEMMLE, 

Universal. 


Most Popular Form of Amusement 

Pathe believes that the Serial is today the most 
popular form of entertainment on the screen. Our 
serial business has advance^ by leaps and bounds and 
we find a ready demand for the class of serial we have 
been bringing out. Instead of a decrease of interest 
in serials we find that the serial public is growing at 
an amazing rate. Every new Pathe Serial brings in 
hundreds of new serial customers-exhibitors who have 
hitherto refused to book serials. Invariably after 
playing their first serial they continue to book this 
style of picture. There is only one answer to this 
—serials make good for them. 

There is no question but that the fans like the 
serial. The same condition which induces the national 
periodicals to publish their big stories in continued 
form operates for the popularity of the screen serial. 
The fans want to see the finish. Consequently the 
exhibitor who books a fifteen-episode serial is assured 
of a following for the fifteen weeks that he shows the 
serial. The box office advantages are too obvious to 
even need pointing out. 

PAUL BRUNET, 
Pathe Exchange. 


Demand Greater Than Ever 

I believe that the demand is greater than ever for 
the serial. Exhibitors are keenly alert for the live, 
original, high-class serial production which maintains 
a standard of quality from first to last reel. The in¬ 
creased business shown by exhibitors who have shown 
discretion in the selection of serials has pointed the 
way to other exhibitors with attendance problems who 
are coming into the serial market in increasing num¬ 
bers. I have selected the serial production field pe¬ 
culiarly on this account. 

The serial is an institution. Like every institution 
it must adjust itself to changing conditions. There¬ 
fore the serial is subject to change. This change may 
not take place in its organic structure. Fundament¬ 
ally, the serial is a short subject episodal. In this 
respect it may not depart from traditional handling. 
The serial must, is and will change for the Better. 
It must meet the more highly cultivated sense of the 
motion picture patronage which compares serial pro¬ 
ductions with that of the high-class, artistically-pro¬ 
duced features. The definite change will be seen in 
the near future in the work of higher-class directors 
whose salaries will rival those of the highest-famed 
in the super-production field, in the exquisite elegance 
of production, richer and more accurate detail, and in 
the work of authors whose reputations are second to 
none in the field of literature or drama. Watch lor 


this change. The serial field offers the opportunity of 
a lifetime to those who anticipate this demand for 
the artistic. 

The change of booking policy will in no way effect 
the booking policy of exhibitors when the question of 
the serial confronts them. 

SIDNEY REYNOLDS, 

Supreme Pictures. 


Construction Should Be Changed 

I am of the opinion that serials for the coming year 
will be in far greater demand than they have ever been 
in the history of the films. I do believe that construc¬ 
tion of serials should be changed. 

There is no reason why a serial should not be the 
same as a feature, and you know a serial should not 
have the impossible possibilities and all the reason 
in the world for their having probable probabilities. 

Today the serial is playing in better class houses 
,shan heretofore, and when a serial is made in such a 
manner that each episode can hold them, and at the 
same time being constructed properly, in other words, 
have the feature production with serial. construction, 
then and only then will the best theaters who have 
never run serials before be willing to show serials. 

HARRY GROSSMAN, 
Grossman Pictures, Inc. 


The Serial and the Future 

Way back in the days when the motion picture was 
a novelty, someone conceived the idea of putting a 
continued story on the screen. This was a novelty 
within a novelty. Instead of ending the story at one 
or two reels, as was customary then, it was presented 
in chapters of two reels each. The principals were 
taken through a series of connected adventures in 
which they sought to attain some end, working always 
against the power of the villain. In order to maintain 
the interest, it was necessary to make the villain a 
sort of superhuman character, or, at least, a master 
criminal who was clever enough to devise the most 
fiendish schemes to bring about the death of the hero 
and heroine or in some other way to prevent them 
from reaching their goal. 

For obvious reasons, thrills predominated in this 
type of story. Each chapter, or episode, had to be 
brought to an end at a point where the hero or heroine 
was in a particularly dangerous situation, and it was 
necessary to see the next episode the following week 
in order to learn the outcome. Big moments where 
emotion was expressed by the face, a movement of 
the hand or the position of the body were never to 
be found. All dramatic situations were necessarily 
sacrificed for physical action. 

The result of all this was that producers, in their 
constant striving for thrills, discounted entirely all 
logic and human credulity. The villain became an 
all-powerful, all-seeing superman, an evil genius to 
whom nothing was impossible, a master of all the 
sciences, both natural and occult. The casual picture- 
goer was amused or entertained, but he experienced 
no other sensation. The thinker, if he could have been 
induced to attend a picture show, would have found 
in the serial an exact parallel to the ancient morality 
play in which right triumphs over the forces of dark¬ 
less and evil after many trials and tribulations. The 
temptations that confronted Parsifal in his search for 









SERIALS 


that mean something. Not "thrillers 
of the "dime novel type, hut produc¬ 
tions logical m story theme, well cast 
and directed and presented adequately. 


“PATHE RELEASE" 


Qtyeobore W * Wtyaxtan 

STUDIOS 

623 West State Street 
Ithaca, New York 













the Holy Grail, the adventures of Christian on his 
journey to the Holy City in “Pilgrim’s Progress” 
were serial themes, pure and simple. 

But a change' has come in the business of serial 
production. The serial has been unjustly called the 
“dime novel” of the screen, because it was more 
primitive in the story i< told than the so-called dra¬ 
matic feature. Either an over-production of drama 
or an under-production of good drama has turned pub¬ 
lic taste towards the serial, and now the “thriller,” if 
you please, is sweeping into a popularity that would 
not have been believed possible a few years ago. 

I long ago ceased to make serials as they are com¬ 
monly known. In the past the serial has been a 
series of sensational incidents strung together by the 
thinnest sort of plot which was constructed merely as 
a background for stunts and thrills. In the future I 
shall make continued stories with the accent on the 
story. In the final analysis, the story is the thing; it 
is absolutely necessary in the making of a successful 
picture. Second in importance is the director, and 
last comes the star. The revamping of a good story to 
fit a mediocre star will no longer serve the purpose. 
The star must now be selected to fit the story. 

So far as the future of the so-called serial is con¬ 
cerned, we have not begun to make them yet. We 
are just at the beginning of the serial era in motion 
pictures and the field we are entering has limitless 
possibilities. Serials today are just where the picture 
business as a whole was ten years ago. Ten years 
from today, if we run true to form, we will see the 
serial at the pinnacle of its excellence. 

THEODORE WHARTON. 


Separate and Distinct 

The spirit of adventure which is so characteristic 
with the American people, demands and expects 
thrills, mystery, suspense and plenty of action. 

A good serial which has these necessary qualifica¬ 
tions is bound to be a success. It is something sepa¬ 
rate and distinct from the ordinary play. It is more 
accumulative in its effect on the mind, more stimulat¬ 
ing and persisting in its impressions. It gives full 
freedom to invention and artifice conception as well 
as picturization, and seems to be especially suited to 
satisfy the public demand in these adventurous and 
exciting times. 

“The serial may be termed the dime novel of the 
screen. Today the book novels are an unsatisfactory 
method for moulding the young minds and not suffi¬ 
cient to upbuild the imaginative faculties. The effect 
of reading these novels depends on the eloquence of 
the reader. 

The film version of these dramas has supplanted 
this medium of entertainment for the young, and it 
stimulates far more effectively the mental process, 
than by reading. 

But the younger generation is not alone a factor to 
the success of the serial, for many maiden hearts have 
executed delightful thrills when their worshipful eyes 
fall on the hero as he enters the frame or when he 
foils the villain. 

S. S. KRELLBERG, 

S. L. K. Serial Co. 


Big Houses Running Serials 

In my opinion, serials for the coming year will be 
in greater demand than ever before. This is due,' 
perhaps, to the fact that producers are giving more 
thought to story and spending more time and expense 
in the production of serials. 

There undoubtedly will be a greater demand for 
serials, due to the fact that so many exhibitors who 
heretofore were skeptical, have now proven from a 


box office standpoint that the serial is a profitable 
attraction. 

The best possible proof of this is that such theaters 
as the Rialto in San Francisco are now running a 
serial. This is the first time in ten years that a serial 
has appeared on Market Street in San Francisco. 

Messrs. Jensen and Von Herberg, who are without 
a doubt the most critical exhibitors in the northwest, 
have just booked a serial in their Portland and Butte 
houses. A number of theaters in Denver are now 
running serials that never ran serials before. 

I certainly do believe that serials should be changed 
in so far as quality of production and calibre of story 
is concerned. 

Heretofore, producers of serials have contented them¬ 
selves with the thought that, as long as there was 
plenty of action, it did not make any difference what 
kind of a story was used for the basis of the produc¬ 
tion. I, for one, am not going to produce a serial 
unless I know that the story is a logical one, and that 
the sensational situations are logically developed, and 
not “dragged in by the heels.” 

I think that since the exhibitors are leaning more 
towards the open booking policy, that the serials will 
be more extensively used than heretofore. There can 
be no doubt as to the value of serials if the experiences 
of a great many exhibitors are considered, as I have 
facts and figures which will show that a great many 
exhibitors have taken their poorest nights and con¬ 
verted them into the best paying nights by using 
serials. 

Take, for instance, the Laughlin Theater at Long 
Beach, California. This theater was losing money on 
Thursday and Friday nights. They booked a serial 
and put it over to such an extent that their Thursday 
and Friday night business exceeded business of Satur¬ 
day night. 

JOE BRANDT, 
National Film Corp. 


Do You Know— 

THERE ARE MORE SERIALS, 
MORE SHORT REELS AND 
MORE NOVELTIES BEING 
MADE THAN EVER BEFORE? 

WID’S SUNDAY ISSUES CON¬ 
TAIN REVIEWS OF ALL THE 
IMPORTANT SHORT REELS 
OFFERED. 





p OR nearly twelve years the stand¬ 
ard of motion picture quality,—the 
film by which the standing of a theatre 
is judged. 

Shown by the large majority of the 
country’s best houses because experi¬ 
ence has shown that week in and 
week out 

PATHE NEWS 

is the best. The only one reel feature. 
- TWICE A WEEK--- 


Pathecolor scenics and educationals 
Wonderful slow motion photography 
Animal pictures by a famous naturalist 
Fascinating scientific pictures- 

Not too much of any one thing but 
one solid reel of diversity and interest 

PATHE REVIEW 

Once a week, beginning October 12th 

A film magazine audiences have 
learned to look for. 









'll 


A Standard Feature 

In the light of the remarkable evolution and devel¬ 
opment of the serial, it is amusing to look back to a 
period of some five or six years ago. At that time 
when the pioneer serials, “The Perils of Pauline,” 
“The Adventures of Kathlyn” and “The Million Dol¬ 
lar Mystery” were being issued the attitude of the 
majority of the larger theaters was one of undisguised 
contempt. This unflattering opinion was reflected in 
the trade magazines, which, while they welcomed the 
extra advertising which serials brought to them, re¬ 
fused to enthuse over the innovation in pictures which 
from the very start made gigantic strides and wrote 
film history. 

I can remember time and time again in those early 
days the results of various “questionnaires” conducted 
by the trade papers on the vogue of serials in various 
parts of the country. The majority of these reports 
were pessimistic. Correspondents wrote that serial 
popularity was problematical and prophesied their 
early demise as business bringers. And we, in the 
Pathe offices, reading the hundreds and hundreds of 
letters from exhibitors just smiled. 

Pathe has been so successful with serials, has so 
accurately gauged the public taste, and has issued so 
many of these continued photoplays, that today many 
concerns are seeking through serials what seems to 
them a sure road to wealth and the industry is being 
confronted with the prospect of an early flooding of 
the market. I do not know the exact number of in¬ 
dependent producers and others who are making se¬ 
rials, but have reason to believe that there are some 
twenty in all. The market cannot digest this large 
number. Many producers will lose much money, for 
the writing, the producing and particularly the mar¬ 
keting of serials is a specialized art and if one link 
in the chain is weak the verdict is merciless, “thumbs 
down.” As the making of a serial, even a cheap one, 
is not a poor man’s proposition those producers who 
are attempting their first serial in the face of the com¬ 
petition existing are taking a long chance. 

Pathe has released more serials than any other con¬ 
cern in the business, nearly thirty. We have made a 
science of them. We know how they should be writ¬ 
ten; the kind of a star most apt to retain and 
strengthen popularity through the long and exacting 
period of fifteen weeks or so; the kind of a director 
best adapted to this particular kind of a picture; the 
elements upon which a serial must depend for suc¬ 
cess. Yet in spite of all this vast experience and 
specialization, in spite of a sales organization trained 
to know and market serials, on some of them we have 
lost money. 

With the exception of a few of the very largest 
houses in the country, serials today are to be found 
in every kind and condition of a house, and in every 
section of the country and in practically every town 
and village that can support a theater. I believe that 
eventually we will be able to prevail upon the few that 
do not run serials and convince them that it will be 
to their advantage to do so. It is significant that 
those houses that do try them out never are without 
them afterwards. The reason is obvious; magazines 
for years have found that in their continued stories are 
their biggest sales arguments. If the monthly maga¬ 
zine reader finds much entertainment in a story the 
installments of which are a full month apart, how 
much more entertaining is it to see that same story 
visualized upon the screen with all its life and action! 
To the exhibitor the proper kind of a serial is a bo¬ 
nanza for it keeps his public returning week after 


week and he benefits materially by most valuable 
word of mouth advertising. One weakness that our 
present feature methods have lies in the fact that the 
average exhibitor does not play his features long 
enough to benefit by that word of mouth advertising. 
About the time when a good picture has really struck 
its stride at the box office it is taken off for another. 
It means that greater advertising effort is necessary 
to put it over. 

The character of story in serials demanded by the 
public has changed considerably during the past few 
years. At first all that was demanded was a succes¬ 
sion of sensational incidents thinly strung together. 
Today the public demands a logical story with a real 
reason for each sensational incident. We are giving 
likewise the best feature production. Today, in many 
of our serials, each two-reel episode costs more than 
a corresponding length of feature film. 

Serials, then, are today a big factor in the business 
very profitable for the exhibitor if they are of the 
right quality, and with a constantly increasing im¬ 
portance. We have found that in order to success¬ 
fully sell our serials to the exhibitor we must sell them 
to the public. Therefore we are spending hundreds of 
thousands of dollars yearly in straight-to-the-public 
advertising. The overhead on each serial is enor¬ 
mous. It is, therefore, incumbent upon us and should 
be upon every other serial producer, to see that serials 
progress and do not stand still, and that public ap¬ 
proval, gained after such a bitter struggle and the 
expenditure of such large sums of money, is retained 
and deserved. 

FRED C. QUIMBY, 

Pathe. 


Influenza Figures 

Why the picture industry was hit so hard by the 
“flu” is shown in the following bulletin of the Census 
Bureau dated November 17, 1918: 

“The influenza epidemic has thus far taken a much 
heavier toll of American life than has the great war. 
The total loss of life throughout the country is not 
known, but the Bureau of the Census has been publish¬ 
ing, for forty-six large cities having a combined popu¬ 
lation estimated at 23,000,000, weekly reports show¬ 
ing the mortality from influenza and pneumonia. 
These reports, which cover the period from Septem¬ 
ber 8 to November 9, inclusive, show a total of 82,306 
deaths from these causes. It is estimated that during 
a similar period of time the normal number of deaths 
due to influenza and pneumonia in the same cities 
would be about 4,000, leaving approximately 78,000 
as the number properly chargeable to the epidemic. 
The total casualties in the American Expeditionary 
Forces have recently been unofficially estimated at 
100,000. On the basis of the number thus far re¬ 
ported, it may be assumed that the deaths from all 
causes, including disease and accidents, are probably 
less than 45 per cent, and may not be more than 40 
per cent, of the total casualties. On this assumption, 
the loss of life in the American Expeditionary Forces 
to date is about 40,000 or 45,000. 

“Thus, in forty-six American cities having a com¬ 
bined population of only a little more than one-fifth 
the total for the country, the mortality resulting from 
the influenza epidemic during the nine-weeks’ period 
ended November 9, was nearly double that in the 
American Expeditionary Forces from the time the first 
contingent landed in France until the cessation of 
hostilities.” 




Frankie Mann 

LATEST STARRING PRODUCTION 

“The Isle of jewels 

MANAGEMENT OF ARTHUR F. BECK 







Educational Purposes 

Expressions from several notable collegiate heads on the importance of pictures from an edu¬ 
cational viewpoint. 


Value for Direct Teaching 

I have no doubt of the high value of the motion pic¬ 
ture for educational purposes and I do not mean 
simply for general education but even for direct teach¬ 
ing. Of course, it will take time to develop this and 
the motion picture interests would undoubtedly do 
well, if they have not already taken the step, to asso¬ 
ciate with themselves for this purpose representatives 
of the various branches of education. 

j CYRUS ADLER, 

Acting Pres. The Jewish Theological 
Seminary of America. 


Valuable to New Courses 

I should think that motion pictures would be a most 
valuable adjunct to educational work in a number of 
our courses, especially science. The subject is so new 
that it is difficult to give a general expression of 
opinion in regard to the value of motion pictures. I 
should think that their value would be settled by the 
professor of each particular department. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 
W. S. Carrell, President. 


Films Need Improvement 

While most educators realize there are great possi¬ 
bilities for the moving pictures in the field of educa¬ 
tion, a great deal remains to be done in improving the 
films that are before the public before they can be 
of any service in advancing public taste and stimu¬ 
lating serious thought. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 

Schenley Park, Pittsburgh. 


A Coming Necessity 

Undoubtedly our schools and colleges will soon come 
to regard the moving pictures as just as necessary as 
a few years ago the stereopticon was thought to be. 

KENNETH C. M. SILLS, 

Bowdoin College. 

Pictures Will Be Indispensable 

The schools and colleges of the country are only 
beginning to appreciate the educational value of mov¬ 


ing pictures. As our educational processes are devel¬ 
oped and perfected this value will be more and 
more appreciated, until the moving picture machine 
will be considered an indispensable adjunct to every 
high grade institution of learning. 

HENRY LOUIS SMITH, President, 
Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. 


Proper Kind Have High Value 

I consider that motion pictures of the proper kind 
have a very high educational value. 

W. S. CURRELL, President, 
University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C. 


Needs Interest from Big Men 

It seems to me that the moving picture business is 
now in the transition stage. I feel sure that its pos¬ 
sibilities for sound education as well as amusement 
will inevitably take it out of its present rather flam¬ 
boyant and sensational condition. It seems to me 
that, speaking broadly, at the present time it has 
altogether too much of the sensational as well as the 
undesirable particularly from the standpoint of youth¬ 
ful minds. In watching moving picture audiences I 
have been impressed with their interest in expositions 
of things with which they are familiar and particu¬ 
larly their interest in anything that illustrates the 
habits of animals or that otherwise demonstrates 
natural processes or is explanatory of phenomena 
which come to the attention of everyone. 

I feel sure that if a few earnest men would take 
hold of one end of the moving picture business with 
the idea of making it a most useful instrument for 
education that they would not only meet with finan¬ 
cial success, but that they would demonstrate the 
stability of moving pictures. I feel that the mov¬ 
ing picture can be as instructive and of as much per¬ 
manent interest as the daily paper or the weekly 
illustrated journal. 

RAY LYMAN WILBUR, President, 
Leland Stanford Junior University. 


F. I. L. M. Clubs and Managers* Associations 


Film Exchange Managers’ Association of Atlanta, 

Atlanta, Ga. 

New England Film Exchange Managers’ Asso¬ 
ciation .Boston, Mass. 

Motion Picture Exchange Managers’ Association, 

Buffalo Chamber of Commerce.Buffalo, N. Y. 

F. I. L. M. Association of Chicago.Chicago, Ill. 

Cincinnati Exchange Managers’ Association, 

Chamber of Commerce.Cincinnati, O. 

Board of Motion Picture Exchange Managers, 

Chamber of Commerce.Cleveland, O. 

Denver Film Exchange Men’s Board of Trade, 

Denver, Colo. 

Board of Motion Picture Exchange Managers, 

Detroit Board of Commerce.Detroit, Mich. 


Kansas City Film Board of Trade. . .Kansas City, Mo. 
Los Angeles Film Board of Trade. .Los Angeles, Calif. 
Minneapolis Film Board of Trade. .Minneapolis, Minn. 


The Jesters.New Haven, Conn. 

Omaha Film Board of Trade.Omaha, Nebr. 

Northwest Film Board of Trade. .Seattle, Wash., 

Portland, Ore. 

F. I. L. M. Club of Pittsburgh.Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Northwest Film Board of Trade.Seattle, Wash. 


San Francisco Film Exchange, Board of Trade, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Intermountain Film Board of Trade, 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

St. Louis Film Board of Trade.St. Louis, Mo. 

Exchange Managers’ Association. . .Washington, D. C. 




















HARD TO BEAT 

THIS TITLE COMBINATION 


TOM BRET 


“The most successful 
film editor in the world.” 

—Dramatic Mirror. 

“A master of art cap¬ 
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Tom Bret has just fin¬ 
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version 

“THE BIRTH OF A 
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and the American ver¬ 
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Also titles for Drew 
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Tom Bret’s film writ¬ 
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movie fan circulation of 
over six billions and he 
is actually the most 
widely read writer of 
fiction in the world. 

His humorous sayings in 
TOPICAL TIPS 
alone, are enjoyed every 
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The Veterans 


oldest producer, director and exhibitor in the United 


Interesting information pertinent to the 
States. 

ED PORTER 

First and Oldest Director, Producer and Camera Man 
ITNTIL Ed Porter made “The Life of an Amer¬ 
ican Fireman” in 1899 as the first long feat¬ 
ure there had been no pictures over fifty or 
seventy-five feet in length. Mr. Porter went 
with the Edison Company in 1898 as Manager of 
Productions. He was given complete charge of 
all motion pictures made by the Edison company 
and made the first so-called “feature” film. While 
making the short-length films Porter saw that 
if it was possible to make people laugh with 
films it would also be easy to do drama with a 
good story. He therefore hired a cast to work in 
“The Life of an American Fireman” with Arthur 
White as leading man. White is now with the 
B. F. Keith organization. The leading woman was 
Vivian Vaughan. The picture was along the 
same lines as “The Still Alarm” and was ob¬ 
tained with the co-operation of the Newark and 
Orange fire departments. The outdoor scenes 
were all taken at Newark and Orange while the 
studio work was done at the Edison studio on 
,2 1st stre et. “The Life of an American Fire¬ 
man,” with a length of 800 feet proved to be such 
a success that “The Great Train Robbery” was 
filmed. 

While making “The Great Train Robbery” 
Porter was on the lookout for a few “bold bad 
bandits” and among the applicants for the job 
was-Gr^M- Anderson who later became famous 
as “Broncho Billy.” The company had to go 
about nine miles out of New York to reach 
“location” and when they arrived a horseback 
ride of six miles was necessary. They rented 
horses at a livery stable and before giving each 
man a horse including the “bandits,” “sheriff” and 
regulation “posse” they were asked whether or 
not they could ride. When the question was 
put to Anderson he said that he could. The 
entire party set out and when they arrived at 
“location” Anderson was missing. Another man 
was hired for his place and the picture went on. 
When they had finished shooting the scenes and 
after returning the horses the keeper of the stable 
informed them that Anderson had ridden about a 
mile and had been thrown by the horse and had 
' returned the animal and went back to New York. 
Anderson later turned out to be an excellent 
horseback rider. 

The success of “The Great Train Robbery” 
converted more people to the possibilities of 
^notion pictures than had ever been interested in 
motion pictures previous to this time. It was a 
real “thriller” and was played in legitimate thea¬ 
ters all over the United States. Carnivals used 


it as their main attraction. Shortly after the 
production of “The Great Train Robbery” Bio¬ 
graph produced “The Moonshiner” which ran 
about six hundred feet. 

Among the later films that Ed Porter directed 
for Edison were “Jack and the Beanstalk,” “Uncle 
Tom’s Cabin,” “The Kleptomaniac,” “The Seven 
Ages” and “The Miller’s Daughter,” In 1906 
D. W. Griffith, who had been working in stock 
and also writing short stories for magazines was 
hired by Porter for his first appearance in films. 
He was made leading man for “The Eagle’s Nest r 
which Porter was producing at that time. After 
this picture Griffith went to Biograph as a scen¬ 
ario writer and when the regular Biograph direc¬ 
tor became ill he was given a chance to direct 
a picture. The rest is well known. 

Porter, it can be truthfully said, was the first 
producer, director and first camera man. He did 
all the camera work for his early productions. 
After leaving the Edison company Porter founded 
the Precision Machine Company, makers of the 
Simplex projection machine. He then formed the 
Rex company and later with P. A. Powers, Carl 
Laemmle, David Horsely and other independents 
formed the Universal Film Mfg. Company. He 
was instrumental in forming the Eamous Players- 
Lasky Company and held a forty-five per cent, 
interest in that company until he sold out in 1912. 


Edison—Inventor of the Motion Picture 

HE possibility of making a record of animate 
movement was predicted long before the ac¬ 
tual accomplishment. It is well known that the 
modern art of motion pictures depends entirely 
upon instantaneous photography. It is also true 
that the suggestion of the idea and that suggestion 
which later brought about the mechanical equip¬ 
ment with which to perfect it was made long be¬ 
fore instantaneous photography was discovered. 

Although the first motion picture was made in 
the summer of 1899 it had its real birth a century 
earlier when Plateau, a Frenchman, constructed 
an optical toy, the “Phenakistiscope” forerunner 
of the “Zoetrope” or “Wheel of Life.” This ma¬ 
chine was introduced in America in 1845. In 
1840 Ducos obtained a patent in France on a 
machine similar to the “Zoetrope.” It was pos¬ 
sible to get pictures of moving parades, military 
manoeuvers, etc. There are many others who be¬ 
lieved Ducos’ theories but they were held back 
by the shortcomings of photography. 

The first serious attempt to secure a record of 
movement by photography was made in 1878 by 
Edward Muybridge. It was brought about 







.. . .. „ , . . al t. . . „ *>. • ■ * • ;- 

Variety is Mistaken 
It is NOT a Secret 


From A Recent Issue 


TURES 53 

THE UNBROKEN PROMISE 

What puts “The Unbroken 
Promise,” with Jane Miller in the 
leading role, on the exhibitors’ 
map is the photography, though 
who did it and the amazingly fine 
laboratory work is kept secret by 
Triangle Kay-Bee people, who 
made this production . . . 

.The fact remains 

however that for the photography 
alone this feature is worth show¬ 
ing. It has an even tone, a blend¬ 
ing of effect that is at once un¬ 
usual and deserving remark. 


OUR WORK IMPROVES ALL PICTURES 


OURS ARE 


“UNBROKEN PROMISES” 


Kessel for “Quality” and “Service” 







through a wager that he had made with Sena¬ 
tor Leland Stanford who contended contrary to 
popular belief that a trotting horse left the ground 
entirely at one point in its gait. At this time 
wet plates of very great rapidity were known and 
by arranging a series of cameras along the side 
of a race track and having strings tied to the 
shutters which the horse would automatically op¬ 
erate by stepping on them while passing down 
the track. A series of clear photos were obtained. 
Positive prints were developed from the negative 
and mounted on a modified form of “Zoetrope” 
and projected on a screen. Only one movement 
was obtained by Muybridge and to have taken 
photos of a trotting horse for one minute would 
have required 720 cameras. In the early 80’s the 
dry plate was introduced and Muybridge’s experi¬ 
ments! were carried on more effectively. 

This constitutes about all that had been done 
and all the knowledge that had been accumulated 
on the motion picture when Edison first started 
his experiments. In 1&8.7. the idea came to Edison 
that motion could be recorded by means of an 
instrument and then thrown upon a screen. It 
was readily seen that a camera would have to 
be perfected that would take pictures at the rate of 
from twenty to forty per second, in other words, 
a single camera would have to be used. 

In 1889 Kodak film was being perfected by the 
Eastman Company and film was finally obtained 
that would be small enough and move fast enough 
to take the pictures that Edison required. The 
next thing to do was to invent a machine that 
would take pictures at the rate of fiom twenty to 
forty per second. This was. finally accomplished 
and in the summer of_ldS9 the first motion picture 
camera was made. The first means of seeing 
these pictures was with the Kjjietoscqpe and 
anyone could plainly see the pictures by peering 
through a peep hole in the camera. In 1895 the 
first attempt was made to apply motion pictures 
to a magic lantern and by that means throw them 
on the screen. This was the first experiment along 
these lines. 

The first studio that Edison built and used 
was called “The Black Maria” by the Edison or¬ 
ganization. It was an oblong wooden structure 
with a movable roof. The roof could be raised or 
lowered at will. 

The studio building was painted black both 
on the outside ancf inside. Instead of beautiful 
scenery for a background only the bare black 
walls made a uniform back for all productions. 

The entire structure was set on a pivot so that 
it could be swung around with the sun which was 
the only available means of light. 

THE FIRST PICTURE THEATER 
By Eugene Le Moyne Connelly 

O Harry Davis and T ohn P . .Harris-, of Pitts- 
InirgTT unquestionably belongs the credit for 
having blazed the trail for the moving picture 
theater industry. 


It was their joint initiative that gave the world 
its first moving picture theater, and it was they 
who coined the word Nickelodeon. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Harrisi have been partners 
in the amusement business nearly all their lives, 
Mr. Harris, the junior of his associate by a num¬ 
ber of years, was scarcely more than a boy when 
he became a factor in the show world. They were 
presenting Keith vaudeville in the Avenue Thea¬ 
ter in Pittsburgh when the first moving pictures, 
were shown in this country, and were among the 
earliest exhibitors of the films that introduced the 
new art to the pleasure seeking world. Between 
the acts in the bill at the Avenue it was their wont, 
in the early days, to show a reel of motion pic¬ 
tures. These were such curiosities at this time 
that a lecturer was provided to discourse upon the 
wonders of the new invention and to describe 
the process by which photography was obtained 
in motion. Beaumont Smith, a distinguished ac¬ 
tor of the old school who was playing in the stock 
company which they conducted next door in the 
Grand Opera House, was chosen, on account of 
his native eloquence and trained elocutionary 
powers, to explain to the public “the marvels of 
the Lumiere Cinematograph,” and to expatiate 
upon the beauties and realistic effects of “The 
Charge of the French Cuirassiers.” the first pic¬ 
ture in motion to be exhibited in Pittsburgh. 

So widespread was public interest in these pic¬ 
tures that Mr. Harris, with a vision of the future 
far more prescient than any of his contempor¬ 
aries, proposed to Mr. Davis that a vacant store 
room which the latter had under lease in Smith- 
field St., between Fifth Ave. and Diamond St., 
be converted into a theater and opened as an 
exclusive picture playhouse. Mr. Davis was quick 
to see the opportunity his partner’s .suggestion 
offered and assented with enthusiasm. 

Quickly the old store room was denuded of its 
fixtures and, gaudily decorated with a burlap 
front, over plain boards, equipped with a total of 
ninety-six opera chairs, in Tune, 1905, under the 
name of The Nickelodeon, to the accompaniment 
of a screeching phonograph, opened its doors to 
the public. 

From the first it was a huge success, and its 
kind began to multiply like mushrooms in a dark 
cellar on a danksome night. Before the new 
year had dawned Mr. Davis and Mr. Harris had 
opened a chain of Nickelodeons in Pittsburgh that 
numbered fourteen and besides had other houses 
in Philadelphia and Buffalo. Not all of them 
were called Nickelodeons, however, for though 
this title stuck to every picture show that was 
opened, the Davis and Harris became known 
chiefly as Bijou Dreams. Nickelodeon, suggested 
by the price of admission, was coined by Mr. 
Harris and stuck to the institution of the movies 
like a porus plaster. 

The Nickelodeon did a “land-office business.” 
It was packed all day long from 8 in the morning 
till midnight. One reel of film, running for a 







I 


ARE 



‘CTie Sign of a Masterpiece 
in color 


A Practical achievement of prac¬ 
tical color motion photography 
for practical exhibitors who want 
practical results combined with the 
highest artistic qualities in the sub¬ 
jects they use. 

PRIZMA MASTER PICTURES, 
photographed in Nature’s colors, rep¬ 
resent the supreme achievement of 
1919 in the motion picture industry. 

Used by all leading theatres to build 
prestige and profits. 

YOU SHOWING PRIZMA? 



period of from twelve to fourteen minutes, com¬ 
prised the entire program and the audiences 
changed every quarter hour. Thus, with only 96 
seats available, the first moving picture theater 
in the world played every day to 7,000 and 8,000 
people, its total capacity in seats for the diurnal 
run of 16 hours being 6,144, which, with addition 
of standing room, made possible the enormous 
crowds that flocked “to see the movies.” 

From the beginning, when only scenic or news 
pictures were shown, the development ran rapidly 
to one reel comedies, in most of which were 
laughter provoking chases. 

There has long been a canard afloat in the mo¬ 
tion picture world that the second picture house 
was opened in Warsaw, Poland, by a smart Pole, 
who passing through Pittsburgh took his “cue” 
from the Nickelodeon and hastened back home to 
emulate the Harris-Davis enterprise. As a mat¬ 
ter of fact, the second house was opened by Mr. 
Davis and Mr. Harris in Pittsburgh and was 
known as Bijou Dream, the idea of the change 
being to avoid confusion upon the part of the 
public. 

In striking contrast to their modest Nickelo¬ 
deon, with its 96 chairs, is their present “MIL¬ 
LION DOLLAR GRAND,” said to be one of 
the handsomest moving picture theaters in the 
world. It seats 2,600 people, has a full sym¬ 
phony orchestra, and entertains the most exclu¬ 
sive clientele in Western Pennsylvania. The Da¬ 
vis Theater, a block away, is another beautiful 
playhouse under this same management. It pre¬ 
sents Keith vaudeville. 

Mr. Harris is a native son of Pittsburgh and 
has made his way in the world by dint of indus¬ 
try, initiative and intelligent business acumen. 
In Pittsburgh, theJilarris Amusement Companies 
control the Harris Theater, the Sheridan Square 
Theater, vaudeville houses, and various picture 
theaters. Cincinnati, Wilmington, Detroit, 
Washington, McKeesport and other cities have 
also received the impress of the Harris genius for 
organization and theatrical management. He also 
has many other interests. 


“EVERY DAY A GOOD DAY” 

By J. Esten Bolling, B.M.E. 

IXTEEN years ago an Engineer named Car¬ 
rier became impressed with the fact that many 
businesses suffered severe losses, at various times 
in the year, because of adverse weather condi¬ 
tions. 

He began to dream. He dreamt of a modern 
industrial establishment wherein the weather was 
manufactured to meet the exact requirements of 
the business. 

Then he began to study. 

And today his dream is a reality. 


In hundreds of the finest plants in America, all 
the way from those manufacturing chewing gum 
to those producing motion pictures, that Engi¬ 
neer’s apparatus is manufacturing made-to-order 
weather—more than four hundred million pounds 
of it every working day! 

Sounds odd, doesn’t it, to talk about weather in 
pounds. But weather is simply air, so far as the 
interiors of buildings are concerned. It may be 
cold air, hot air, dry air, moist air, pure air, scented 
air, or whatever you may imagine, but it is, pri¬ 
marily, air, because air conveys to us the effects 
of weather. 

Air can be weighed, just as sugar or coal can 
be weighed, and we know exactly how much air 
is required for all the various kinds of work which 
might, for instance, be done in a film laboratory, 
or a film studio. More than that we know the 
best kind of air to supply to that laboratory or 
studio. It must be neither too hot nor too cold, 
too dry nor too moist, and it must, of course, be 
free from dust and impurities, which might injure 
the product or carry disease to the human beings. 

Air is like a sponge, in that it is constantly 
trying to absorb moisture. Unlike a sponge, the 
quantity of moisture which air can hold depends 
upon the temperature of the air. Hot air can hold 
many times as much moisture as cold air. For 
this reason, winter air, which, being cold, is cap¬ 
able of holding but very small quantities of mois¬ 
ture, is usually saturated, that is, it contains all 
the moisture it can hold. 

For the same reason summer air which, by vir¬ 
tue of being much warmer, can contain far greater 
quantities of moisture, is never saturated, in fact, 
rarely contains more than half as much water as 
it could contain at its summer temperature. 

Temperature acts on air just as your hand acts 
upon a sponge. If you squeeze the sponge you 
expel the water. If you relax your grip the 
sponge immediately absorbs more water. So 
with air. If the temperature drops, the moisture 
content of the air immediately reduces accord¬ 
ingly. The excess moisture is condensed from 
the air and falls as water. That’s what causes 
rain—cold in contact with a cloud, because a cloud 
is simply super-saturated air. 

If the temperature rises the air immediately 
tries to absorb more water-vapor, the quantity 
which it absorbs depending upon the quantity 
available. 

Manufactured weather is a reality. Although 
its principal applications, so far, have been indus¬ 
trial, the fine theater, the efficient laboratory, 
the modern studio of the near future, will all be 
equipped with apparatus for manufacturing wea¬ 
ther. Because Manufactured Weather makes 
“Every day a good day.” 





ener 


nnounces 


To be Known as 


HARRY REVIER PRODUCTIONS 










































































































Sunday Closing Fights 


Connecticut 

50 members of Pastors’ Union of New Haven pres¬ 
ent petition asking that theaters be closed on Sundays. 

Sunday closing law upheld by Judge Hoyt. Sug¬ 
gests effort be made to have Connecticut legislature 
amend law. Otherwise no Sunday pictures in New 
Haven. 

Bill legalizing Sunday pictures in towns of over 
10.000 introduced in legislature. 

Norwich to have Sunday shows by popular vote. 

New Haven aldermen ratify State law allowing 
Sunday pictures. 

Middletown City Council votes 6 to 4 for Sunday 
pictures. 

Governor Holcomb kills bill passed by legislature 
legalizing Sunday opening. 

Georgia 

People of Atlanta vote on question of Sunday open¬ 
ing. 

May opeh shows on Sunday at Atlanta. 

Illinois 

Evanston ministers in combating films plan Sunday 
shows with proceeds to charities. 

Mutual Theater Co. of Marion gets injunction pre¬ 
venting City of Marion interfering with Sunday shows. 

Allied Amusement Association of Chicago discusses 
Sunday closing agitation. 

Indiana 

Bitter fight on in Indiana—Exhibitors present bill 
to state legislature favoring Sunday opening—Large 
opposition. 

Committee on Rights and Privileges reports favor¬ 
ably on passage of bill which would legalize Sunday 
pictures. 

Changes in Sunday opening bill made to allow more 
censorship for films shown on Sunday; Superintendent 
of city schools would have jurisdiction; 1,000,000 
signatures to petition in favor of opening. 

Indianapolis Ministerial Association takes steps to 
enforce Sunday closing. 

Iowa 

Reformers trying to promote bill that would prohibit 
Sunday opening bill. Exhibitors fight to maintain the 
present legislation which leaves local option. 

Massachusetts 

Sunday opening bill on calendar at legislature. 

Michigan 

Petitions being circulated in Adrian in favor of 
Sunday shows. 

Hillsdale theater owners open on Sunday to test 
law. 

Nebraska 

At election in 'Lincoln, 3,941 for and 6,052 against 
Sunday shows. 

New Hampshire 

Cobliegh bill introduced in legislature will, if passed, 
le r Uize Sunday opening of theaters. 

New Jersey 

Mayor Dorsey of Trenton, who favored Sunday 
shows, has fight with Civic Betterment League who 
are opposed to it. 


Passaic clergymen hold indignation meeting be¬ 
cause of revocation of law prohibiting Sunday opening. 

Asbury Park Board of Commissioners allow Sunday 
show for charity. 

After conference with Mayor exhibitors of Elizabeth 
allowed to operate Sundays with educational films. 

Hyland bill reaches Governor Edge illegally for sig¬ 
nature. 

Mayor of Elizabeth threatens to sew up town tight 
if council insists on enforcing old “blue law” with 
which they are closing theaters. 

In order to escape punishment at trial for having 
opened their theaters on Sunday nine theater owners 
will have to promise to remain closed in the future. 

New York 

Justice McCann of Binghamton starts state-wide 
agitation on Sunday opening by throwing out of court 
injunction to stop police from interfering with shows 
in Binghamton. 

Sydney Cohen prepares bill to legalize Sunday open¬ 
ing. 

Merchants and citizens present petitions to Mayor 
asking for Sunday shows. 

Bill ready for legislature on Sunday opening. 

Senator Foley introduces local option bill in legisla¬ 
ture. 

Mayor of Schenectady vetoes council’s ruling allow¬ 
ing Sunday pictures. Theaters to open for test case 
of Mayor’s power. 

Nyack Board of Trustees refuse petitions asking for 
Sunday opening. 

Governor Smith signs Thompson bill legalizing 
Sunday opening. Slacer bill would have provided 
Censor board killed. 

Donohue-Thompson bill allowing local option for 
Sunday pictures passes by vote of 84 to 58. 

Ohio 

Town council goes on record as against Sunday 
shows at Dover. 

Salem theater owners ask permission of Council to 
remain open on Sundays. 

Pennsylvania 

Representative Rourke of Philadelphia introduces 
bill allowing Sunday pictures after 7 P. M. 

William A. Brady leads fight for Sunday opening 
before Governor Sproul at Harrisburg. 

Rhode Island 

Move on foot to close theaters on Sunday—started 
with sermon at church. 

South Dakota 

Reformers trying to repeal law which allows educa¬ 
tional films on Sunday; trying to establish law pro¬ 
viding heavy fine for showing of any kind of pictures 
on Sunday. 

Pierre and other South Dakota exhibitors threaten 
to enforce every clause of Sunday closing bill if passed 
by legislature. 

Texas 

Agitation here regards Sunday opening. Only few 
towns have show. 

Washington 

Petitions favoring Sunday shows circulated in 
Yakima. 



HOLMES 


QUEEN OF SERIAL 
LIGHTS 


TONE 


With 


out 


Question 


the 


Serial 


Greatest 


Pa 


du 


d 


evei 


o 


7 


ce 


Mo 


Br/A 





























Open Booking 

Interesting ideas from some of the most notable men in the industry on this important question. 


Survival of the Fittest 

It will be a survival of the fittest when several other 
big distributing concerns adopt the open booking policy 
this fall. 

Each production, every star and every producer, 
will have to succeed or fail alone. There will be 
neither props or lode stones. 

Open booking, generally adopted, will improve the 
quality of attractions at least a hundred per cent, 
within the next year. 

In the two years of First National’s existence as a 
distributor of big special feature attractions on the 
open market we have come to realize how difficult it 
is to obtain a consistent supply of super-features. They 
have not been plentiful, by any means. Undoubtedly, 
other distributors who have not yet had any practical 
experience with open booking will encounter the same 
difficulty in maintaining an adequate releasing schedule 
that will be up to standard in the quality of its 
subjects. 

They may be able to overcome this shortage of 
worth-while attractions after the stars and producers 
have had a year or more in which to adjust themselves 
artistically, mentally and financially to the require¬ 
ments of the open market. 

J. D. Williams, 
Manager First National. 


Each Production a Unit 

Each production is now treated as a distinct unit, 
rather than a link in a chain of program entertain¬ 
ments and every factor for success is to be allowed full 
play in time and resources. 

Not only does the inauguration of this new policy 
mean greater advantages for the producer; it makes 
for the elimination of one of the greatest evils in the 
exhibitors’ field—the purchase of unseen productions. 
Under the new system, exhibitors will be given an 
opportunity to see just what they are buying and to 
judge for themselves of the potential drawing power 
of the picture. Exhibitors will agree with us, I think, 
that this is the greatest single step forward in the 
recent history of the industry. 

Another factor making for better pictures will be the 
opportunity for the unlimited expenditure of money on 
the producing end of the business. Under the former 
system, the earning power of the picture—to the pro¬ 
ducer—was settled in advance. Consequently, the cost 
of production was held within certain definite limits. 
With the present opportunity to gather returns in exact 
ratio to the expenditure, more money will be spent in 
an effort to produce higher grade pictures. 

CECIL B. DeMILLE, 
Director Gen. Famous Players-Lasky. 


Way Paved For Deserving Productions 
The industry is passing through one of the most 
vital stages of its development and the change to open 
booking policy, if sincerely carried out by all distribu¬ 
tors who have announced their adoption of it, would 
give the industry the greatest impetus that it had 
since its humble inception. The plan will bring to the 
theaters of America, tremendously increased box office 
receipts, the result of giving free play to the exhibitors’ 
resourcefulness and ingenuity in selecting, individually, 
practically every subject he offers his patrons. 

With all the talk we hear nowadays of self-determi¬ 
nation and freedom of action received naturally that 
both of these should have the freest operation in the 


families of the industry and it is a foregone conclusion 
that the intelligent exhibitor, with such freedom would 
offer none of the hundreds of inferior subjects, which, 
under long term contracts, he was compelled to inflict 
upon his patrons. Such subjects would become so in¬ 
active that the producers would be compelled to remove 
their menace by not releasing them. 

With the open booking policy, the exhibitor will 
find himself with sufficient time to permit his playing, 
soon after release, all big, timely productions, which 
have in many cases been denied exhibition in localities 
where they will have made more money for everyone 
concerned. In other words, the way will have been 
paved for 90% distribution on deserving productions 
and very limited distribution for the undeserving; thus 
“fewer if really better” subjects will be adequate— 
because of each good subject being afforded open time 
in practically every locality. 

Business integrity of course should not permit the 
term “open booking” to be utilized by selfish distribu¬ 
tors as a deceptive slogan instead of actually giving 
the exhibitor the advantage of its full meaning and 
actually permitting him to rent a given subject at the 
same price, by itself, as he would pay were he 
contracting for fifty subjects. 

PAUL BRUNET, 

Vice Pres., Pathe Exchange. 


Has Good and Bad Points 

The reaction from the epidemic of new booking 
“policies” is liable to take almost any turn. 

“Open booking” has its good points and its bad 
ones—and the latter, it appears to me, far overbalance 
the former. “Open bookings” have been enjoyed at 
all times by the theaters that demand this particular 
policy; the star and the program series plan, with 
cancellation clause, is ideal for the smaller houses. 
The “open booking” policy means a great increase in 
sales cost, boosted rental prices, and an auction sale 
of desirable pictures where there is competition, with 
no protection whatever for the exhibitor. 

The epidemic of new “policies” is merely another 
phase of the continual compromise that keeps the mo¬ 
tion picture industry out of the class of a legitimate 
business, and forces its continuance as a “game,” in 
which the slogan seems to be “Sting ’em all!” It is 
merely another method of prolonging the time until 
producers must get down to brass tacks, co-operate 
with the exhibitor, and give him value for his money, 
by switching the waste of money in this business 
into another channel and keeping it pouring there 
until the theater owners awaken to the new goldbrick 
game that is being worked. 

L. W. BARCLAY, Advertising Manager, 
Grand Amusement Co., Inc., Johnstown, Pa. 


Selective Booking Greatest Event 

It was the season just over that brought about Sel¬ 
ective Booking. That it was the greatest event of 
the past year is a plain fact; that it will be the 
greatest institution of the coming season is a pretty 
sure prophesy. Its merits are clearly defined. It will 
eliminate the poor picture, the incompetent producer. 
It will result in greater financial returns for both pro¬ 
ducer and exhibitor on the pictures of merit. And 
only meritorious pictures will survive. 

ARTHUR FRIEND, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 






J. D. Williams, Business Manager First National Exhibitors Circuit, Says: 


“The Successful Era of the 
Independent Producer Is Here!” 


Ernest Shipman says: 

“Some months back I went to Calgary, Can¬ 
ada—selecting this city because of its known 
progressiveness—and organized a $250,000 
company known as “Canadian Photoplays, 
Ltd.” 

* * * 

Our object was to produce nature pictures 
upon the actual locations described by the 
author, James Oliver Curwood, in his stories. 

* * * 

This took us north of latitude 55, where we 
made screen drama in weather 50 degrees 
colder than zero. 

* * * 

The result is a picture entitled 

“BACK TO GOD’S COUNTRY” 

a success so pronounced that the FIRST 
NATIONAL EXHIBITORS CIRCUIT, INC. 
contracted for the world’s rights, as the first 
of their six big specials. 

* * * 

The directors of New l r ork’s two million dol¬ 
lar theatre, “THE CAPITOL,” confirmed First 
National’s judgment by booking it for an 
early New York run. 



NELL SHIPMAN 

Who Now Shines as a 

FIRST NATIONAL STAR 

in 

James Oliver CurwoocTs 

Latest Screen Success 

“BACK TO GOD S COUNTRY” 


No higher tribute is possible in filmdom! 
* * * 


EDNA SHIPMAN 


An earning capacity of half a million dollars 
from world’s rights is the estimate of men 
who have access to past records. 

* * Si! 

Market conditions with which I am in con¬ 
stant intimate touch warrant the making of 
unusual pictures. 

* * * 

Apart from a second company forming in 
Canada, and one in the West Indies, I am 
free to consider propositions.” 

ERNEST SHIPMAN. 


who made her 
professional debut 
in 

‘ ‘Back to 
God’s Country” 

and gives every 
promise of eventu¬ 
ally reaching the 
ranks of stardom. 

















Just a New Name 

The opening booking policies should be satisfactory 
to large theaters who only book 4 to 8 pictures a 
month, but for an exhibitor like, myself who has a 
large string of theaters in small cities with daily 
change the problem will be one of unending trouble 
and after all we will have to book many pictures 
at one time, so what is the difference. 

As I see it, it is the same old game of draw poker 
under a different name. 

The large theaters who book week stands can look 
at every picture before showing it. But how I am 
going to look at ten pictures every day is more than I 
can figure out, which is another proof of saying that 
film marketing will not be changed a great deal. 

F. J. REMBUSCH, 
Shelbyville, Ind. 


Elimination of Mediocre Stars 

As the result of the change in the booking policy 
for the coming season, there will be an elimination of 
dozens of mediocre stars who have in the past been 
forced upon the exhibitor to enable him to get the 
better grade of stars he required for his theater. 

I also believe that it will result in higher prices for 
film, and a great reduction in the number of subjects 
marketed. 

JOHN H. KUNSKY, 

Detroit, Mich. 


Longer Runs for Better Pictures 

The result in the change of the booking policy will 
be longer runs for better pictures. It will cut down 
the number of productions made, but more money will 
be made with those that are issued. Exhibitors have 
always w r anted the best but they did not know that the 
way to get the most money out of the best, was to ex¬ 
ploit in a big way and then show the picture long 
enough to get every ounce of value out of the exploi¬ 
tation. 

I think another result of this change will be that 
the right kind of foreign features will have easier 
access to this market, for the very reason that the 
exhibitors’ programs will not be so crowded. And I 
think that subjects like “Better ’Ole” have shown the 
exhibitor that it does not necessarily take an Ameri¬ 
can-made production to draw people to the box office. 

CINEMA DIST. CORP., 

J. L. Kempner. 


Will Last as Long as Wanted 

The exhibitor, no matter where located, is always 
the arbiter and “open booking” is going to last in this 
country as long as the American exhibitor wills it to 
last. 

INTER-OCEAN FILM CORPORATION, 

Paul H. Cromelin, President. 


To Be a Panacea 

Open booking is to be the panacea for all ills. In 
its fevered state the industry beholds the mirage of 
the millenium. Producers apologize for the past. Dis¬ 
tributors promise better treatment for the future. The 
old adage, “When the devil was sick,” comes to mind. 

To the unfairly treated exhibitor open booking should 
be a welcome experiment in release from bondage. 
But not all exhibitors are unfairly treated, not all are 
disgruntled. Many are satisfied and content with the 
arrangements they have themselves made for efficient 
service and good product. They have contracted for 
pictures which they DO want. To such as these 
open booking may suggest unsettled standard of price 
and big demands on their time, with internecine com¬ 
petition,. and doubtful protection after it all. 


The logical result must be the banding together of 
exhibitors to form their own self-helpful groups and 
aggregations. Local organizations have already begun 
to grow up simultaneously with the open booking plan. 
Witness the Northwest. 

Local groups will combine with similar and larger 
exhibitor-communities, and finally these local organi¬ 
zations will combine into one big united co-operative 
organization of exhibitors. What has happened in 
other branches of the amusement field? History is a 
surer guide than prophecy, and the history, for ex¬ 
ample, of theatrical booking, in the “legitimate,” in 
vaudeville, and in burlesque, shows that whilst indi¬ 
vidual booking failed, circuits and wheels succeeded. 
System replaced chaos—and history, it is said, repeats 
itself. 

J. A. BERST, 
United Picture Theatres. 


Producer on His Mettle 

Better pictures will be produced as the exhibitors 
will have the opportunity of having the best, which 
will put the producer on his mettle. 

Selznick Pictures Corp., 
HARRY RAPF, Gen. Mgr., 


Force Poor Pictures Out of Business 

The open booking policy—sometimes known as the 
Universal policy—I am confident it will benefit every 
big production as far as the big points and large 
theaters are concerned. 

Second, it will give meritorious productions a bet¬ 
ter opportunity than they had when the exhibitor 
could not book them because he was already tied up 
with other stuff. While it is true that many exhibitors 
under such conditions put their contract pictures on 
the shelf and booked the big production, it required 
hard work and extra salesmanship to sell the idea to 
the exhibitor. 

Third, the open market system, if really adopted, 
will force poor pictures out of the business. 

Fourth, it seems probable that in the smaller towns 
the exhibitors will follow the lead of the Big Time 
Theaters. While the so-called smaller exhibitor will 
probably prefer to continue the old way of booking 
either by the series or program plan, he will keep 
more of his time open for big pictures which prove 
successful in the larger houses. 

The business will stand or fall on the basis of 
MERIT, which is the very best thing that could hap¬ 
pen to the whole industry, after all. I, for one, will be 
delighted when schemes are thrown into the discard 
and nothing counts but the picture itself! 

CARL LAEMMLE, 

Universal. 


Will Eliminate Poor Film 

My viewpoint for years has been that the only suc¬ 
cessful booking policy from both exhibitor’s and pro¬ 
ducer’s point of view, is one which places every pro¬ 
duction entirely upon its merits without any connection 
whatever with any other film or program. 

This system will eliminate the poor films—relegate 
to the junk heap the more inferior product which has 
been forced on the public during the past, and will 
enable the meritorious productions to earn the larger 
profits they deserve. 

I am unequivocally for open booking on an individ¬ 
ual basis, and am making all my productions and 
shaping my business policies towards this end. 

J. STUART BLACKTON, 
Blackton Productions, Inc. 










EDMUND BREESE 


STARRED IN 
“The Master Mind” 

Lasky 

“Walls of Jericho” 

Fox 

“Shooting of Dan McGrew” 

Metro 


“Song of Wage Slave 

Metro 


“Lure of Hearts Desire” 

Metro 

“Spell of the Yukon” 

Metro 

“The Master 
Crook” 

Harry Raver 


“Someone 
Must Pay” 

Special Feature Engagement 

Ivan Abramson 

“The Tempor¬ 
ary Wife” 

Gaumont 


COMING RELEASES 

Title to Follow Title to Follow 

Ivan Abramson Gaumont 


.gfliiiiiiiiinQiiiiii! 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuuiniiH 






A Most Salutary Stimulant 

Effect of new booking policy should be most salu¬ 
tary stimulant to the industry. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 


The Test 

It will be the test. Only the fit will survive. 

JESSE L. LASKY, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 


More Foresight Needed 

The result of the change of booking policy for the 
coming season will in effect accomplish this: it will 
gradually yet surely eliminate the undesirable or 
mediocre production; it will encourage the making of 
independent productions of extraordinary merit; it 
will allow of the managers of motion picture theaters 
conducting a policy based upon merit of production 
rather than upon the popularity of any particular star 
or brand of pictures, and finally, and what to me ap¬ 
pears to be most important, it will compel the managers 
of motion picture theaters to exercise greater care in 
the choice of their subjects, and they will be com¬ 
pelled to evidence more showmanship, originality and 
foresight in the conduct of their institutions. 

The change in policy of booking productions is the 
natural readjustment of the motion picture business 
along sane, legitimate and logical business lines. 

WM. L. SHERRILL, 

The Frohman Amusement Corp. 


Everyone Should be Satisfied 

The manufacturers and distributors have met the 
wishes of the exhibitors so every one should be satis¬ 
fied. H. M. THOMAS. 


A Good Thing 

I am positive that the New Booking Policy is a 
very good thing as it places pictures upon the market 
that otherwise would be shown exclusively at certain 
houses only. 

Prohibition has an important bearing on the picture 
game as it places more money upon the market and 
naturally the people turn to amusements. 

WM. H. CASEY. 

New Royal and Alhambra Theaters, Evansville, Ind. 


L. J.’s Ideas 

I do not know what the "new open booking policy” 
is. The only open booking policy that I know any¬ 
thing about is the old open booking policy which I 
introduced three years ago merely as a means of 
smashing the old program. When a man is sick, the 
doctors give him a lot of poisonous drugs to cure him. 
The exhibitor was sick with programmitis and I dosed 
him with open booking. As soon as he was well, I 
cut off the supply of the drug and gave him Star 
Series. Because open booking did the business I de¬ 
signed it for, some other producers are now adopting 
it as a cure-all, but I do not think this drug habit will 
ever get a firm hold on the exhibitors. They are too 
wise and realize that the day is past for this form of 
distribution. I cannot regard it seriously. 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK. 


Prefers Program 

Prefer dependable program service provided quality 
features are furnished. 

HENRY W. GAUDING, 
Lincoln Theater, Pittsburg. 


Sweeping Effect for Good 

The new booking policy will have a sweeping effect 
for good upon the industry. Every picture will stand 
on its own merits. If you have a good picture you 
will get the money. Otherwise you won’t. 

MACK SENNETT. 


What Single Picture Selling Means 

The sale of motion pictures single on their merits 
means either quick or slow suicide for those producers 
who lack the capacity or intelligence to assemble the 
elements of merit. How quickly or how slowly such 
producers die depends upon the measure of their 
intelligence. 

Single picture selling on merit does not mean fewer 
independent producers. It means more independent 
producers than ever before. It does not require a big 
machine to make the biggest pictures. Big machines 
are more apt to take the heart, the warmth and color 
out of the big stories than they are to put those ele¬ 
ments into stories. A noteworthy case in point at 
the moment this is written is one very widely-ex¬ 
ploited production on which a great organization is 
centering its biggest hopes for 'an entire season—and 
this picture was made by a directing genius under 
independent auspices. The organization now con¬ 
trolling it does not even pretend to have had a hand 
in its production. 

Single-picture selling means fewer so-called big 
producing-distributing companies. Those that survive 
and take a permanent place in the industry will strive 
to acquire the distribution of the best-made independ¬ 
ent pictures and the quickest to die will be those that 
try to exist on those pictures produced exclusively 
with their own facilities. 

Single-picture selling means the professional death 
of a great many cheap directors, who never should 
have been directors; the professional death of many 
inferior personalities who have been falsely labeled 
“stars.” 

In brief, competitive conditions and economic pres¬ 
sure are going to clean out an industry that lacked 
the "guts” to clean itself out before being forced to 
do so. 

And you can safely say that everything that is 
cleaned out will be "good riddance.” 

F. B. WARREN, Vice-Pres., 

W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 


Will Be More Deadly than “Flu” 

The open booking policy, which some of the leading 
film manufacturers have adopted for the coming sea¬ 
son, will be more deadly to the industry than the "flu” 
was last Fall. 

It gives no guarantee or advantage to any exhibitor 
in advertising his own shows. 

In my opinion the star series booking, which was 
in force last year, was the greatest booking system in 
the world. 

Anyway, the manufacturers have set their plans 
now and no doubt will work in the open booking policy 
in the coming season. In a few words, they will try 
it once at any cost. 

Let them try it and they will find out that the time 
will come when they will have to co-operate with the 
exhibitors. 

MELTON PHEL, 

The Elyria Theaters Co., Elyria, Ohio. 


Possibilities Wonderful 

Basing my opinion upon the present attitude of the 
Associated Film Exchanges and not losing sight of 
the extenuation of some of the Distributors into the 
exhibition field, I do not feel that the change in the 
booking policy was designed for beneficial results to 
the present Exhibitors. The possibilities of this 
change are wonderful provided the new policy is cor¬ 
rectly handled. 

J. H. SPENCER, 

Winding Gulf Exhib. Circuit, West Ya. 











.13. ■ JL.BJI.M « H- 



MOONSHINING JUDGE 
m TRICKING THE GOVERNMENT 


HiS OWN PEOPLE 


VOM 


PPIHCE of KHAPIKAP 

m K BLUE MOOH " 


mans Rrnrep 

































































The Only Fair Way 

We will stand or fall by our efforts. This is the 
only fair way to everyone concerned. It is the only 
truly successful manner of doing business today. The 
returns on a product must always be commensurate 
with its merit, or else someone is dissatisfied and in 
modern business there is no place for the person 
whose customers are dissatisfied. 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 


Postal Mailing Regulations 

Postmasters are hereby directed to accept motion- 
picture films for transmission in the mails outside of 
mail bags when packed and labeled in conformity 
with the Interstate Commerce Commission regulations, 
as follows: 

Rule 43— 

(a) Moving-picture films must be packed in 
tightly-closed metal cases inclosed in a strong, 
spark-proof wooden box; or in spark-proof cases 
made of sheet iron not less than 0.02 inch thick 
(No. 25 U. S. standard gauge) and lined through¬ 
out with fiber board at least % thick, or some 
other equivalent insulating material. The cov¬ 
ers of these cases must fit tightly and must lap 
over the body at least inch on the sides, form¬ 
ing a tight joint. 

All packages containing motion-picture films must 
have attached thereto by the shipper a diamond¬ 
shaped yellow label, each side four inches long, with 
the wording printed in black letters inside of a black¬ 
line border measuring 3 1 /! inches on each side, as 
follows: 


NOTICE 


TO 


Postal Emplcyees 

CAUTION 

Keep Fire and Lights Away 

Sweep Up and Remove Carefully Contents of Broken 
Packages 

This is to certify that the above articles are 
properly described bv name and are packed 
and marked and are in proper condition 
transportation, according xo the regula¬ 
tions prescribed by the Interstate 
Commerce Commission 
Shipper’s Name 


Shipper’s Name 


All such packages must be placed in cars and offices 
in postions that will permit of their ready removal in 
case of fire. They must not be loaded in cars nor 
stored in stations or offices in contact with steam 
pipes or other sources of heat. 

These instructions do not apply to motion-pictue 
films made of cellulose acetate, which are now mail- 
able. 

This order to be effective Jan. 1, 1917. 


Edward 

Warren 

Productions 


Inc. 

1482 Broadway 
New York City 



Under the Personal Direction 


of 


Edward Warren 










FAMOUS PLAYS PLUS FAMOUS STARS— 


FAMOUS STARS PLUS FAMOUS AUTHORS 


Famous Stars 

ALICE JOYCE, womanly and beautiful at the peak of her artistic career. 

EARLE WILLIAMS, the Chesterfield of the screen—gentleman and actor. 

HARRY T. MOREY—“more of Morey” is the cry—a man’s man. 

BESSIE LOVE, the little girl who will never grow up—Bessie the beloved. 
CORINNE GRIFFITH, tantalizing mixture of girl and woman, majestic yet dainty. 
GLADYS LESLIE, the girl with personality plus. Versatile and vivacious. 

Famous Authors 

REX BEACH, the master moulder of romance and adventure. 

ROBERT W. CHAMBERS, he writes for the people—the kind everybody reads. 
RUPERT HUGHES, he knows life and people and writes of them. 

MARY ROBERTS RINEHART, she mixes romance and mystery with master hand. 
IRVIN S. COBB, writer of the humorous and serious story. 

BOOTH TARKINGTON, the mouthpiece of youth—delineator of drama. 

RICHARD HARDING DAVIS, he wrote of the world and is read by the world. 

O. HENRY, the king of the short story. 

GEORGE ADE, an inventor of quaint slang, a maker of laughs. 

GOUVERNEUR MORRIS, writer of the unusual love story. 

AMELIE RIVES, she writes BIG STUFF. 

GEORGE RANDOLPH CHESTER, the father of Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford. 

Famous Plays 

Here are some of the famous stage productions now on the way to the screen: 

“THE CLIMBERS,” Clyde Fitch’s greatest with Corinne Griffith as star. 

“THE FORTUNE HUNTER,” Winchell Smith’s big one—-a John Barrymore success. 
“THE SPORTING DUCHESS,” that massive Drury Lane spectacle. 

“THE COLLEGE WIDOW,” by George Ade. 

“SHENANDOAH,” the always popular. 

“THE GREAT DIVIDE,” perennial vehicle of Henry Miller and Margaret Anglin. 

VITAGRAPH 


ALBERT E. SMITH, President 










Most Important Event of the Year 

Answering the question , “What do you consider the most significant happening in the motion 
picture industry between September, 1919 , and 1920 ?”, producers, distributors and exhibitors ex¬ 
press their opinions in the following pages. 


The Coming of Peace.—SAMUEL GOLDWYN. 


Selective Booking 

Beyond the shadow of a doubt the most important 
event of last year was the final announcement that 
the leading film corporations of the business had de¬ 
cided on the Selective Booking Plan. How this will 
effect the industry I have previously outlined in a 
statement issued at the time that the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp. announced its intention of adopting it. 
That it will be criticised is a foregone conclusion. In 
fact it has already been criticised. But so was the 
Star Series criticised when first inaugurated and yet 
later it was accepted as the only booking policy. But 
the industry has advanced and with its advancement 
it has demanded a better distribution method than the 
Star Series method. This something better is Selec¬ 
tive Booking. In time exhibitors will realize that is 
the method of booking. They will take it as a matter 
of course just as they took the Star Series booking as 
a matter of course. It will mean for them the elimi¬ 
nation of the poor and the bad pictures. In defense 
of themselves manufacturers can’t issue poor pictures. 
If they do they will lose money to the point where 
they will have to get out of business. Therefore the 
effect of the Selective Booking policy aims towards the 
betterment of motion pictures. 

ADOLPH ZUKOR. 


Awakening of Producer 

The most important event of the last year was the 
awakening of the producer. He has been going along 
merely turning out pictures with the hope that he could 
get them through with an extravagant publicity cam¬ 
paign spending thousands of dollars in mailing litera¬ 
ture, magnifying and exaggerating certain types of 
pictures they made, and in most instances calling them 
KNOCKOUTS AND DOUBLE KNOCKOUTS, occa¬ 
sionally catching a few birds on the fly-paper who 
has suffered bitterly by showing those pictures, and 
this exhibitor (the fly), who was caught on the paper 
was almost commencing to believe that he was in a 
bunco game and not in an legitimate business. He had 
become embittered, and I might say that he has be¬ 
come aroused and that the producer has awakened to 
the full realization of the conditions as brought about, 
and as a result, the announcement follows that better 
and fewer pictures are to be offered, and the most 
pleasing part of these statements is that I know that 
a genuine effort and a sincere honesty of purpose is 
being made by the bigger producers who stand for 
something in the industry. While I have in a meas¬ 
ure sounded the shortcomings of the producer, I re¬ 
alize that the exhibitor, too, has had his shortcomings 
where he expected to receive a dollar value for ten 
cents rental, but he is willing today to match up to 
the conditions as they present themselves, therefore, 
I am naturally optimistic, especially in view of the 
fact that national prohibition is going to make a dif¬ 


ference in the receipts of every exhibitor in the 
entire United States of from twenty to thirty per cent, 
increase. 

Let us all recognize that we have an industry that 
we should be proud of, and let each unit co-operate to 
attain the very best results for all. 

EUGENE H. ROTH, 
California Theater, San Francisco. 


Booking Methods Antiquated 

The most important event of the past year was the 
fact that we discovered that our booking methods 
were antiquated—and that reform was necessary. To 
admit a wrong is in itself a sure sign of progress. 
Whether “open booking” as defined by the various 
distributors will furnish the remedy it is impossible to 
say at this time—but that it will lead to something 
beneficial to all is a foregone conclusion. 

The time is here when the distributor must “deliver 
the goods” if he is to keep pace with progress. Merit 
will determine the value of pictures. If exhibitors re¬ 
fuse to book the “bad” pictures, the producer and dis¬ 
tributor will out of necessity furnish good pictures or 
else go out of business. And a good picture will not 
be judged by the amount of advertising that a dis¬ 
tributor does or what he says in his announcements. 
The picture itself can and will speak eloquently. In 
other words distributors will not have to “sell” pic¬ 
tures. The exhibitor will “buy” them. 

HAROLD B. FRANKLIN, Managing Director, 

Shea’s Hippodrome, Buffafflo, N. Y. 


Selling Pictures Individually 

The most important event of the past year was un¬ 
doubtedly the announcement of practically all producer- 
distributor factors in the business to sell pictures indi¬ 
vidually on their merits. 

W. W. HODKINSON, President, 

W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 


Exhibitor Awakens 

The most important event during the past year was 
the awakening of the exhibitor to the importance of 
his position, the possibilities of theater beautification 
and the value of publicity. 

H. M. CRANDALL, 

Crandall’s Theaters, Washington, D. C. 


Can Improvement Keep Pace with Demands 

Personally I am of the opinion that the industry 
itself had little to do with “the most important event 
of the past year.” That event was shaped not by the 
producers nor yet by the exhibitors. It was shaped by 
the spectators. Audiences assembled in moving pic¬ 
ture theaters throughout the year were generally and 
universally of higher standard than formerly. Their 
judgment was keener, their discrimination nicer. They 
knew what they wanted. And what they wanted was 
better pictures—better entertainment. The newer and 
larger and better audiences were not to be satisfied 
with mere star “personality.” 









BURTON KING 


Vice-President and 
Director-General of 

Wistaria Productions, Inc. 



Qeo. Larkin 


Now starring in Wistaria Productions 
under direction of 

BURTON KING 


In preparation the Super-sensational 
Serial 


The Lurking Peril 


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Naturally the increased and increasing discrimina¬ 
tion of audiences brought with it improvement in the 
product of the producers. It remains a question, 
though, in my mind, whether the improvement in 
production has kept pace with the improvement in the 
public taste and judgment. Someone once remarked 
that when the public begins to improve it has a way 
of dropping everything else and devoting itself exclu¬ 
sively to the business of improving. 

. CARL LAEMMLE, 

Universal. 


Ending of War 

I do not know of anything very important since the 
ending of the Worlds’ War. However, since the boys 
have been returning from over-seas, business has been 
very much better, as in the smaller towns the enlist¬ 
ments and drafts practically eliminated the young 
class of trade. The next important event of course 
was the closing of the saloons and as that has not 
been in effect long enough, we are unable to give an 
intelligent observation of what effect that will have 
on business. 

JACK F. TRUITT, 

President, Sedalia Theater, Sedalia, Mo. 


Brighter Prospects Than Ever 

They look brighter to me than any time in the past, 
provided we do not have too much industrial strife. 
Every one has money—the movie is becoming more 
and more popular, and in this section, any way, I look 
for our best year. H. M. THOMAS. 


Declaration of Peace 

What could be more important than the Declaration 
of Peace after this terrific ravage of war which lasted 
about five years? I think that all of our personal 
interests, no matter how large they may seem in our 
own eyes, diminish to a mere trifle in comparison with 
this epochal event. 

HUGO RIESENFELD. 


Re-opening of European Market 

Naturally, the most important thing that has hap¬ 
pened since the beginning of the war is the ending 
of the war. The reopening of the European market 
is the big opportunity we have been awaiting for 
four years. 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK. 


An Optimistic Outlook 

In my opinion the most important event in the film 
industry during 1919 has been the general recognition 
of the soundness and fairness of the Open Booking 
policy, a policy which I am proud to say, Pathe an¬ 
ticipated and adopted in advance of its competitors 
early in 1918. We adopted that policy because we 
failed to see the justice of booking methods which 
jammed pictures down the exhibitors’ throats, whether 
he wanted them or not. We have the best of reasons 
for believing that our attitude in the matter has been 
well appreciated by the exhibitors. 

As to 1920 it is my belief that the tendency will 
cdntinue in the direction of fewer but bigger features 
—pictures of real “special” calibre. Our plans for the 
future at Pathe are being based upon that supposition. 
I believe that the present excellent business condi¬ 


tions will continue, and that the arrival of prohibition 
means that more money will be spent in the motion 
picture theaters. Serials will not merely hold their 
own, but will go into houses which up to now have 
never shown them; but they will have to be developed 
and produced with the utmost care from real stories; 
they must be of true feature quality. 

It is significant that the past twelve months have 
seen fewer disturbances and radical changes in the 
industry than any corresponding period of the past. 
I trust that this means that the business is settling 
down to a common sense basis, and that petty jeal¬ 
ousies, politics, and the desire for cheap personal pub¬ 
licity are being relegated to the background. 

PAUL BRUNET, 

Pathe. 


Fewer and Better Pictures 

The decision of big producers generally to hit upon 
a plan of fewer and better pictures. The little fellow 
who produces the coming season pictures that will 
sell solely upon their merit will have an equal chance 
with the producer who is backed by his enormous 
millions. 

HERB L. WEIL, 

Family Theater Co., 

Port Huron, Mich. 


Produce or Fall 

I believe the most important event of last year 
from the producer’s viewpoint was the adoption of the 
Selective Booking Plan of distribution. This booking 
plan forces the producer to be up on his toes every 
minute of his days to make pictures that will back up 
the distributor in his work. Selective booking brings 
all cards to the table. Every producer must produce 
the real goods or else fall by the wayside. 

JESSE L. LASKY, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 


Future Will Tell 

One hundred years from now every one may be 
able to tell the most important event of 1919. No 
one now has the necessary perspective. To our con¬ 
sciousness, the Armistice seems to overweigh every¬ 
thing else. Future years may demonstrate that the 
most important event this year was the birth of a 
baby in some New York tenement or an idea that 
flashed into the mind of some ragged inventor. 

MACK SENNETT. 


Formation of “Big Four” 

The most important event of the past year was the 
formation of the “Big Four,” the United Artists Cor¬ 
poration, by the three leading stars and the most 
famous dii’ector in motion pictures. 

The coming year, with its promised exploitation 
aids and co-operative methods, should settle once and 
for all the question as to which has the greater draw¬ 
ing power: actors of sterling quality in well known 
plays and stoides, or world famous stars in stories 
that their personalities are “putting over,” so to speak. 

I do not think that two such organizations as the 
Big Four and the Famous Players-Lasky Corp. can 
continue to exist. It does not seem good business for 
the stars to attempt to distribute their own pictures 
when such powerful distributing concerns are in exist¬ 
ence, ready and willing to pay them a salary commen- 












Herbert E. Hancock 

DIRECTOR-IN-CHIEF 


FOX NEWS 

“MIGHTIEST OF ALL” 



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§ 


George W. Terwilliger 

Directed Such Renowned Stars as 


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Gail Kane 
Violet Heming 
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Otis Skinner 
Jane Grey 
Mabel Taliaferro 
Nance O’Neil 
Galli Curci 
Julia Dean 
Montagu Love 


THE STAGE WOMEN’S WAR RELIEF SERIES 

Released by Universal 

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surate with their earning capacity, and whether the 
stars go back on the producers’ terms or on their own 
is a question to be decided in the coming year. 

RUDY SCHLEUSEUER, 

Advertising Manager, The Superba Theater, 

Alhambra, Calif. 


Formation of His Own Company 

The most important event as far as I am personally 
concerned during the past year and in fact since the 
beginning of my motion picture career, is the forma¬ 
tion of Marshall Neilan Productions. I am now in a 
position to really produce motion pictures as I feel 
they should be produced. There will be no time limit 
set on any of my films, nor any money limit. My 
ambition is to make the very best pictures of my 
career as a photoplay director, during the coming 
year. • 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 


Open Booking 

The most important event, in my opinion during 
1919 was the reception given selective or open book¬ 
ing. Independent organizations have set a pace for 
production competition that cannot help but make 
some film folk think that some other fellows also 
inhabit the earth, possessed of enough money, ability 
and “guts” (if you’ll pardon it) to stand up and say: 
“We are here to stay.” 

E. Y. RICHARDS, 
Saenger Amusement Corp. 


Central Booking Agency Needed 

The most important development in the industry 
to date, judging from the widest points of view, is 
the general recognition of the open booking policy. 
Clever salesmen and shrewd business men have al¬ 
ways known that first quality goods, whether dia¬ 
monds, real estate, railroad stocks, automobiles or 
motion pictures, sell on individual merit and create 


their own market, whereas, bonuses, “big sticks” and 
a thousand and one other tricks have to be resorted 
to to force mediocre or bad product. 

An essential in economy now is a Central Booking 
Agency similar to the U. B. O., Marcus Loew, Klaw 
& Erlanger an dthe Shubert Booking Agency, through 
which managers can book their shows—selecting what 
they want and having their show sent to them intact. 

This idea may strike some as Utopian, but it will 
be found the most efficient and economical method of 
distribution in the motion picture business as it has 
in the legitimate theatrical business. 

Gradually, through such organizations as The First 
National Exhibitors Circuit, and kindred alliances, the 
industry is adjusting itself to this plan. It will be 
found cheaper in the long run to put more money into 
positive prints and allow more time for them to make 
the rounds as road shows, with renovating stations 
at frequent points in charge of competent mechanics 
and chemists, than to maintain large offices with high- 
priced executives and hundreds of salesmen. The 
same service can be rendered to exhibitors with a 
small force of experts and Central Booking Agencies, 
that is now rendered with so much motion and money 
wflsto 

ROBERT W. PRIEST, Pres., 

The Film Market, Inc. 


Church Recognition 

Perhaps the most important event of the year was 
the recognition of the motion picture by the Methodist 
Church. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 


Censorship 

The failure of a great many states to create censor 
boards, which would set back the industry to a posi¬ 
tion where it would have hard work recovering. 

W. W. WATTS, President, 

The Vaudette Amusement Co., Springfield, Ill. 



Titling of All 
Kinds in 
All Languages 


Everything in 
Distinctive 
Moving Picture 
Laboratory 
Work 
















EARL METCALFE 

LEADING MAN 


WORLD FILMS 


THE BATTLER 


THE WOMAN OF LIES 
THE POISON PEN” 


Earl Metcalfe 
































What of the Coming Year? 

Symposium of ideas from producers, distributors, exhibitors and others as to what 1919-1920 
has in store—Optimism the keynote of the industry. 


Foreign Business Tremendous Factor 

The prospects for the new season are the brightest. 
This, to be sure, is a bromidic statement but it was 
never so applicable to the business outlook of the 
industry as it is today. Here in the United States 
conditions in the amusement world are most favor¬ 
able barring, perhaps, the few signs of labor unrest. 
But labor unrestful or restful demands entertainment 
and this it will receive from the Famous Players- 
Lasky corporation in its ultimate form. With the 
cessation of the war and the opening of the markets 
of the world, the foreign trade of the picture business 
looms as a tremendous factor. Consider the market 
increased by half again as much as it was a year ago 
and then realize what immense possibilities are opened 
up before the motion picture industry! 

ADOLPH ZUKOR. 


Exhibitor’s Day Has Arrived 

The coming year is THE year for the motion pic¬ 
ture industry. For the first time in the history of 
the industry, no one organization can wield a pre¬ 
dominating influence over the destinies of the busi¬ 
ness. Producers and distributors alike realize that 
during the next twelve months they are going up 
against the stiffest competition, from the greatest 
number of sources, in the entire history of motion pic¬ 
tures; they are far-sighted enough to realize that they 
must frame their policies accordingly. Which means 
that the exhibitor’s day has arrived. A wide open 
market, open booking, no over-loading on weak pro¬ 
gram features to get one or two winners means more 
profit for the exhibitor; more profit for the exhibitor 
means more wealth for the producer. This, in my 
opinion, is the greatest achievement of the film indus¬ 
try within the past year. 

P. W. WELLS, President, 
Howard-Wells Amusement Co., Wilmington N. C. 


Co-ordinate Gains Made 

The season ahead will be the most significant one 
that motion picture men have ever faced. The young 
giant industry, of which they are masters, has grown 
by leaps and bounds. Now, in order to retain the great 
place they have won in the business world and world 
of art, it devolves upon every producer and distributor 
to co-ordinate these gains, to give permanence to this 
new art of which they are the leaders.—SAMUEL 
GOLDWYN. 


Improvement in Public Taste 

The most important event in the coming year will 
be, as I see it, the continued improvement in public 
taste. To meet this we shall have to continue to 
make better and still better pictures. To that end all 
our efforts and energies and resources must be dedi¬ 
cated. I know of nothing else that can be said about 
past, present or future. Universal has passed its 
seventh birthday. That is a short life as most indus¬ 
trial concerns measure longevity. But in this industry 
It is a long, long life. It has been seven years of 
precious experience. If that experience indicates any¬ 
thing at all, it indicates precisely what I have said— 
public taste is steadily improving and the standard 
and quality of pictures must likewise steadily improve. 

CARL LAEMMLE, 

Universal. 


Settling Down 

The coming year means to the motion picture in¬ 


dustry a settling down to a firmer business basis 
than ever before, and a greater impetus to the making 
and marketing of good pictures. 

W. W. WATTS, President, 

The Yaudette Amusement Co., Springfield, Ill. 


Excellent 

Prospects for the coming year are excellent. 

D. AY. GRIFFITH. 


Future Never So Promising 

Events of the last year have demonstrated conclu¬ 
sively and unmistakably that machine-made produc¬ 
tions are a thing of the past. 

Little more than a year ago the machine-made 
output of certain producing and distributing organiza¬ 
tions practically dominated the industry by quantity 
of footage. Stars and producers, working independ¬ 
ently and on the principle that quality was more essen¬ 
tial than quantity, have worked the change. The 
industry has outgrown machine-made pictures. In¬ 
stead, the day of the independent producer—the artist 
who will take the time, spend the money and be gov¬ 
erned by patience—is here in force. 

Never have opportunities been greater or more in¬ 
viting to the independent manufacturers than now. 
They are the source from which must come the pro¬ 
duct on which rests the future of every person in the 
business. 

* The era of bigger attractions, which is not yet a 
year old, already has made itself a valuable contribu¬ 
tor to industrial evolution. With it has come longer 
runs. Exhibitors who. a year ago considered three 
days the maximum season for any production, today 
are playing special feature attractions for seven, eight, 
ten and fourteen days. And there are many instances 
on record of four and six week runs on productions. 

It is a sterling tribute to the merits of independent 
production to note that practically all of the record- 
breaking releases of the last twelve months have been 
made independent of program studios, and released 
through non-program distributing concerns. 

All of this trend toward independent productions 
and longer runs has its evolution, too. It points to 
the day of fewer pictures, but better pictures even 
than the biggest of the successes for the season just 
ended. The future will find stars producing fewer 
pictures a year. The average annual output of a star 
a year ago was eight releases. The average for the 
last season was about four. Next year we will prob¬ 
ably have two real specials as the maximum from 
each star of importance. 

Negative prices have doubled with the decrease in 
the number of releases per star. But the quality of 
productions has doubled and trebled, and the. gross 
incomes have kept pace with the advance. Exhibitors 
have raised their prices for specials. The public has 
been content to pay more for greater quality. The 
exhibitors who put a modicum of business sense into 
the conduct of their theaters have made more money. 
And as the star productions grow less in number per 
year the negative prices will advance, but the quality 
will increase, and this spells a more stable form of 
prosperity on down the line. 

The future for the motion picture as a commercial 
enterprise never has looked so promising and with 
more aspects of permanency, than now. 

J. D. WILLIAMS, 

First Natl. Exhib. Circuit. 










Wm. L. Roubert 


Director 





M 


Business Generally Will Feel Change 

I think this business will receive it’s share of the 
general increase of business, as every line of business 
will benefit. However, our business no more than the 
rest. JONES, LINICK & SCHAEFER CO., 

Chicago, Illinois. 


Acceptance of Pictures by Church 

The coming year means greater prosperity than 
ever before in the moving picture industry. This 
will hold good in all lines, exhibiting, distributing, 
manufacturing, exporting, importing; and in all coun¬ 
tries. 

The public—of all shades and degrees—has come 
to accept the motion picture as the standard enter¬ 
tainment and the great popular educator. 

This was brought about by the acceptance of the 
motion picture by the great Governments, and last 
month by one of the great churches. This last ac¬ 
ceptance was the most important event of the past 
year. PAUL H. CROMELIN, 

Pres. Inter-Ocean Film Corp. 


Troubles of Country Exhibitor 

The patronage of picture theaters for the coming 
year will be greater in number than any time in the 
past. It undoubtedly will prove particularly prosper¬ 
ous for the exhibitor in the large towns and cities, but 
the present system of marketing the numerous special 
productions will prove a serious handicap to the 
country exhibitor in his efforts to show the balance on 
the right side of the ledger at the end of the season. 

We are being asked to pay as high as $150 for pro¬ 
ductions with stars who in 1918 were sold from $15 
to $20, and by the time the country exhibitor spends 
the necessary money to put across one of the big 
features with this same star he finds that although 
his receipts have been doubled and ma-ybe trebled, he 
still has not made as much money for himself as he 
did in 1918. 

In our humble opinion Wm. Fox, Universal and 
World’s present method of handling their productions 
is much more profitable to the small exhibitor. 

O’DONNELL-ESKRIDGE AMUSEMENT CO., 

Washington, Ind. 


The Coming Year Means 

I sincerely believe that the motion picture industry 
will find its way to the second position of the indus¬ 
tries of the world. It is an established fact that the 
popular prices of the motion picture theaters has been 
the success of this line of entertainment and I believe 
that we must guard against getting our prices up to 
where the old legitimate shows will again reign. This 
may not hold good in the larger cities but the smaller 
cities are in the majority. 

THE MERIDIAN AMUSEMENT CO, 

F. G. Heller, Managing Director, 

Anderson, Indiana. 


Director to Be Recognized 

It is my opinion that the most important event in 
the coming year will be that the producers will make 
fewer and better plays, many being based on success¬ 
ful stage shows and well-known novels. If they keep 
their promise in this it will mean the passing of the 
necessity of a well-known star, or a “Catchy Title” 
to get business. It will mean the actual birth of the 
old slogan, “THE PLAY IS THE THING” and the im¬ 
portance of the director will be more recognized this 
year than ever. H. M. CRANDALL, 

Washington, D. C. 


Crisis Has Arrived 

I believe that the coming season means more to the 
moving picture industry than we have had in the life 
of the industry, because the crisis has ari'ived. The 
two necessary factions in the industry, the producers 


and the exhibitors, have been working diligently and 
have carefully analyzed the needs and public wants. 

The exhibitor from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and 
from the Mexican boundary to Canada, in every dis¬ 
trict, has raised the standard of his show-house al¬ 
most to the height of perfection. By this I mean he 
has built it larger, more commodious and luxurious, 
with every up-to-date innovation, well-ventilated thea¬ 
ters, comfortable seats, great strides in the musical 
treatment and offerings, in fact, every minute detail 
and consideration being worked out for the pleasure 
and profit of his patrons. He has followed carefully 
the likes and dislikes of the various photoplays during 
his career, and has been able to give expression of 
his views through the various photoplay magazines. 
He has also received the encouragement of the pro¬ 
ducers who have asked for suggestions as to the pub¬ 
lic wants. 

On the other hand, the producer has more consci¬ 
entiously and more determinedly in the past year given 
their products and their future products the considera¬ 
tion that they merit, with the result that in nearly 
every instance the producer has declared himself as 
offering to the exhibitor a very much higher standard 
of production and fewer pictures, and as a result, I 
believe that we, the exhibitors, are going to be in a 
position the coming season to show our clientele very 
much superior pictures than heretofore. 

It has taken the producer a long time to realize that 
“honest-to-God” money and effort should be put in 
each and every production they turn out, and the foun¬ 
dation of a good picture lies primarily in a good story, 
and good stories can only be secured by encouraging 
good writers, and good writers can only be secured 
by paying them the full margin of what their story 
is worth. It is not particularly necessary that a top- 
notch star be in the cast. While that adds tremen¬ 
dously as a box office attraction, it means little if the 
star hasn’t the 100 per cent, cast for his or her sup¬ 
port. 

During the last season I have exhibited a half dozen 
or more, very excellent stories without stars, but with 
a superb cast, and the interest was manifest through¬ 
out the entire picture, and it was especially gratifying 
to me to see the financial result, because each day the 
business increased to a degree of rounding out a very 
handsome week. The first day’s showing of a feature 
sends out of our theater thousands of satisfied boosters, 
or thousands of dissatisfied persons, and it is useless 
to “kid” ourselves along with what we can get away 
with, because we know that we can’t. We can fool 
the public some of the time, but we cannot fool all 
the people all of the time, therefore, the producer must 
put his “ear to the ground” and listen to the sincere 
demands of the exhibitor to give us pictures, and the 
exhibitor must know and must be willing to pay con¬ 
sistent prices Because That Is the Only Way That 
An Exhibitor Can Get His Pictures. 

EUGENE H. ROTH, 

San Francisco. 


Never Before Outlook So Bright 

Never before in the history of motion pictures has 
the outlook been so bright. It will undoubtedly prove 
the most successful year for the producer since the 
inception of the photoplay for never before has he had 
the opportunity to give his productions such time and 
effort as he will have in the immediate future. Every¬ 
one has come to realize that high-class screen enter¬ 
tainment cannot be ground out like shoes or lead pen¬ 
cils. With the conditions now evident, American 
production of films should witness its greatest strides 
forward during this year. The exhibitor also finds 
himself in a stronger position this year than ever 
before. He is no longer compelled to sign up a string 
of pictures to the exclusion of better subjects which 
may come along later on. He can pick and choose to 
an extent never before possible. 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 











|o! 


Possibilities Unparalleled 

The future of the motion picture is unlimited in 
possibilities and scope. It occupies much the same 
relation to education, science, art, literature and busi¬ 
ness as the printing press. Because of this relation 
and its factor as an entertainment its possibilities are 
unparalleled. The motion picture is a far more effec¬ 
tive vehicle in transmission of thought than printed or 
spoken words, for it reproduces action coupled with 
pictorial splendor that is not possible in cold type, 
plates, etchings and kindred means. 

ROBT. W. PRIEST, Pres., 

The Film Market, Inc. 


Sees Early Return to Previous Methods 

The so-called theatrical season commencing in Sep¬ 
tember will no doubt be the forerunner of possibly the 
greatest evolution in the history of the motion picture 
industry. It is going to be a case of the survival of 
the Attest as respects both production and exhibition. 
The open booking policies put out under the guise of 
a “selective plan” is either going to spell ruin or suc¬ 
cess to both the producer and exhibitor. In the writer’s 
opinion it resolves itself into nothing more or less than 
the mere bartering of picture for public exhibition, and 
he foresees an early return to the previous methods of 
exploitation, or the star series plan of booking for the 
season of 1919-20 is certain to revolutionize the in¬ 
dustry. 

HERB L. WEIL, 

Family Theater Co., Port Huron, Mich. 


The Biggest Year 

The coming year means its biggest year. The signs 
all point to this and none should be so blind that they 
won’t read the very plain letters. 

The most important event of the past year was, in 
my opinion, the way the home market opened to an 
English picture. I would give you the name of this 
picture only modesty forbids—I am handling it! 

J. L. KEMPNER, 
Cinema Dist. Corp. 


Sees Four Reel Features 

The coming year will see the establishment of pro¬ 
ducing organizations with a sound business policy of 
production and exploitation, the elimination altogether 
of stock floating concerns and the transient producer; 
the creation of independent producing concerns for the 
exploitation of individual stars; the increase in short 
subjects of merit, and the reduction in length of 
productions commonly styled features from six, seven 
and eight reels to a maximum of five reels. I predict 
features in four reel lengths, and the creation in 
Innovations in subjects the like of which have never 
been heretofore attempted. 

WM. L. SHERRILL, 
Frohman Amusement Corp. 


Concentration 

The coming year in the motion picture industry 
means CONCENTRATION from every angle—the con¬ 
centration of production material in the hands of a 
few groups and the concentration of theaters in the 
hands of a few concerns. Out of it all will come 
several big business organizations instead of the chaos 
now prevailing. 

now prevailing. W. W. HODKINSON. 


Wonderful Opportunities 

The greatest opportunities in the world for the edu¬ 
cation and entertainment of a public that has gone 
through three years of sorrow and is in an amicable 
mood to receive teachings of every good sort. Never 
in the history of the industry has it had such wonder¬ 
ful opportunities before it. The industry itself can 
become one of the greatest factors in the lives of the 
coming generation by bending its efforts to producing 
pictures that will educate and uplift—pictures that do 
not inevitably deal with the sexual question, pictures 
that bring a message that leaves an everlasting im¬ 
pression. 

“ISSY” BERNSTEIN, 

Natl. Film Corp. 


Great Opportunity 

The coming year will be the best year this Industry 
will ever see, and the year that the little man as well 
as the big one, will have a chance to realize a nice 
profit. 

KAROS & O’LEARY, 
Eagle Lake, Texas. 


Will Make No Prediction 

jj 

It is impossible for me or anybody to conscientiously' 
say what is going to happen during the coming year. 
Changes are constantly taking place, and I for one 
would not care to predict the future, as I do not be¬ 
lieve that any man living knows what it’s going to be. 

In regard to the operation of the theaters—far be 
it from me to try to tell some of the boys how to run 
their theaters. „ I aip satisfied.that there is a great deal 
I can still learn. 

MARCUS LOEW. 


Brighter Than Ever 

They look brighter to me than any time in the past, 
provided we do not have too much industrial strife. 
Every one has money—the movie is becoming more 
and more popular, and in this section, any way, I look 
for our best year. H. M. THOMAS. 


Better Than Ever 

The prospects for the motion picture business have 
been improving year by year because exhibitors are 
gradually learning to be better business men and to 
know the difference between reckless promises and 
legitimate propositions. They have learned that it is 
foolish to book cheap pictures because they ure cheap, 
and that it pays to get the best. They have learned 
that a picture they can get for a low rental is often 
much more expensive than one that costs them many 
times as much, because the cheap picture will drive 
people away, while the other will crowd their houses. 
For this reason the demand for good pictures is so 
big that producers are encouraged to spend big money 
for real stars, high-class stories and the best directors 
in the business, and consequently the prospects for 
the coming year are better than ever. 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK. 


Fewer, But Better Pictures 

Prospects for the coming year in industry are very 
bright. There will be fewer pictures but they will 
be of greater merit than ever before. 

MACK SENNETT. 













Increased Admissions a Serious Problem 


Wait and See 


It is only fair to suppose that next year should be 
very prosperous as there are more people today than 
ever that have acquired the picture-going habit, and 
if the exhibitors are going to be able to show real, 
worthy pictures there is no reason that the present 
large patronage should not continue and, in fact, 
increase in number. There is, however, one quite 
serious problem to be confronted and that is too 
great an increase in the over-head of operating motion 
picture theaters, thereby necessitating a noticeable 
increase in the cost of admission, which I am afraid 
is going to have a very material effect upon the attend¬ 
ance. The motion picture patronage today is com¬ 
posed of the masses of which the greatest percentage 
are poor people or those in moderate circumstances. 

The motion picture theater is essentially the poor 
man’s amusement resort and the small cost of admis¬ 
sion has made it so. I am of the opinion that the 
raise of admission price is something needing serious 
thought. 

I am not prepared to say what is going to be the 
result of the constantly increasing cost of film and 
other overhead expenditures. However, it is only a 
reasonable conclusion that if the operating expense 
of the theater is going to increase from 50 to 100 per 
cent, that the admission price is going to do likewise. 
The M, P. theater was created at 5 and 10-cent prices, 
which was its big successful bid for patronage. If it 
was up to me to set the policy, it would be “good 
pictures at popular prices,” prices within the easy 
reach of all the people. Large attendance at small 
admission fees. 

The legislature of Virginia last year adjusted the 
licenses in this state on the plea that the motion pic¬ 
ture theater was the workingman’s amusement place. 
On the strength of this plea the license rate where the 
admission fee is 30 cents or less, was made quite 
nominal and for over that price of admission the 
license charge was made quite heavy, just four times 
greater. 

When I speak of the motion picture theater, I do 
not refer to the big entertainment palaces such as the 
New York, Rialto, Strand and Rivoli or similar theaters 
in cities with a half million or inore population, where 
a two-liour or more entertainment is given consisting 
of 35-piece symphony orchestra, an eight-reel picture 
program and some big vaudeville or concert act. I 
refer to the real dyed-in-the-wool motion picture 
theater where they go to see pictures and pictures 
only. 

There are a thousand people to patronize the M. P. 
theater at 25 cents or less where there are not 200 at 
50 cents or more. 

The overhead cost of operating the theater is what 
influences the price of admission and when this gets 
too great you are going to change the picture-going 
habit from a daily incident to an occasional event for 
the wage earning people. It’s too bad that something 
cannot be accomplished in the way of organization be¬ 
tween the big units of the industry, namely, the Pro¬ 
ducers and thei Exhibitors. This so far seems to be 
impossible. I am more or less familiar with the efforts 
to build a national exhibitors’ organization and though 
the efforts have been strenuous and sincere enough, the 
results have been sorrowful. However, let’s still hope 
for the best. 

The cheap prices enables and encourages thousands 
of people to frequent picture theaters daily and a large 
percentage of them visit two and three theaters a 
day. This is what makes the big daily attendance. 
This they will not be able to do if the admission 
price grows too large. 

JAKE WELLS, 
Richmond, Va. 


The season of 1919-20 to the motion picture indus¬ 
try should bring it to the apex of its development, 
provided the producers make good on their promises, 
which, if all find fulfillment, should make the exhibi¬ 
tor’s bed one of proverbial roses. Perhaps January or 
February 1920 would be the best calendar barometer 
to judge by, than September, 1919. 

The midsummer “free-for-all” “O-promise-me” ma¬ 
rathon, in which “new policies” are annually re-born, 
and come to life every September, present so many 
angles of serious thought and interest to exhibitors 
and producers alike, that only a miracle-man could 
predict its success or failure. Fair and equitable film 
rentals, with practical efficiency and a visual degree 
of real service, would help immeasurably. 

A cautious yet sensible admonition to every ex¬ 
hibitor in America, can be told in three words: “Wait 
and see.” 

E. V. RICHARDS, 
Saenger Amusement Corp. 


Production Undergoes Great Change 

As regards the prospects for the coming year I am 
only too happy to state that they appear unusually 
rosy at this writing. The production of pictures has 
undergone a great change in a year’s time. More 
attention is being paid to the securing of good stories, 
more attention is being paid to their proper presenta¬ 
tion, than was the case a year since. Pictures will 
no more be credited to a single individual as time 
goes on. They will be the result of collective stellar 
talent, talent of the best in every department of pro¬ 
duction. Cooperation of writers, scenarists, directors 
and players is the order of the day and will be the 
general order of the business of picture production 
before many months. 

JESSE L. LASKY, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 


Outlook Tremendous 

I believe the prospects for the industry during the 
coming season are tremendous, mainly due to the fact 
that, with the war over, the markets of the world, 
some of which have been closed for four years, are 
again open to all business and the share of this busi¬ 
ness that will accrue to picture distributors is practi¬ 
cally immeasurable in figures so great are its possi¬ 
bilities. With respect to the domestic situation, here 
too, the possibilities are extensive. Selective Book¬ 
ing, recently inaugurated by the leading motion pic¬ 
ture companies, alters the whole financial aspect of 
the industry and promises an era of prosperity for 
both producer and exhibitor that has surely never 
been paralleled before in the history of the industry. 

ARTHUR FRIEND, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 




I 



FINDING ^£g MARKET 

Most important of all phases of motion picture 
manufacture is the market. 

Experience is of prime importance. Trust¬ 
worthiness is vital. 

We are in constant and intimate touch with 
t the market. We know where your picture 

will sell for the most money. We’ll get the 
biggest price for your negative from both 
domestic and foreign distribution. 

Fair dealing and honest relations with pro¬ 
ducers and distributors have built for us an 
established and select clientelle. 

The next time you have a picture for the 
market consult us. Let us show you where 
the money is—and get it for you. 

C. B. PRICE CO., Inc. 

Z o t i o n ‘Pictures 
IMPORT — DOMESTIC — EXPORT 
TT/mes {Building , York City 














What of Prohibition? 


Unanimous expression, barring a few, that closing of saloons will work to the ultimate profit of 
exhibitors—Some interesting and unique ideas. 


Good, But Don’t Relax Vigilance 

The thing we are sure of in this game is WHAT 
HAPPENS. Have seen Washington, Montana and 
California go closed (not dry) and they all acted differ¬ 
ently. The effect on the film industry is the same, i. e., 
increased taxes, which means a greater, intensified 
showmanship to bear the added burden. 

B. O. results, I have found, are in direct ratio to the 
efforts expended—wet or dry, though both have their 
virtues as well as their faults. I have shared in and 
enjoyed increased patronage in the past by reason of 
prohibition but likewise I observe that when we tried 
to shut off power and coast awhile; business immedi¬ 
ately dropped along with our relaxed vigilance. The 
answer is keep water in your radiator, gas in your tank, 
oil in your C. C. and look out for cops. 

RALPH RUFFNER, 
Rialto, San Francisco, Cal. 


Business Increased 30 Per Cent. 

We have had a very excellent opportunity of gauging 
the effect as we have been operating in a community 
that has been dry for three years, while other houses 
of our circuit are in towns that have been distinctly 
“wet” being railroad towns. The business in our 
Woodland theater, in the three years the town has 
been dry has increased about 30% over what it was 
during the “wet” regime, and I am obliged to confess 
that a “dry belt” has certainly proved to be a winner 
in this section. 

W. STUART WEBSTER, 
Strand Theater Circuit. 

Woodland, Cal. 


“Winnie” Sheehan’s Ideas 

Motion pictures wherever they came in competition 
with the saloon put the saloon out of business, because 
they provide a better entertainment for less money, 
and because a man can take his entire family to a 
motion picture theater twice a week for a smaller 
sum than would be required for his personal amuse¬ 
ment in a cafe for one evening. 

Because motion pictures are the best amusement 
for the general public, and because the theaters are 
conveniently located a man who wants to forget his 
worries will naturally turn to a motion picture house 
where before his foot sought the brass rail. 

Motion pictures have not fought against the saloon, 
they have merely attended to their own business by 
providing amusement to the public. Their reward for 
minding their own business will come with the in¬ 
creased patronage as prohibition becomes more and 
more effective. 

WINFIELD R. SHEEHAN, 

Fox Film Corp. 


A Benefit 

We know what will be the effect, as Washington 
has been dry for some three years, and we have had 
a wonderful era of prosperity. I believe that prohibi¬ 
tion, in every case, is a benefit to the motion picture 
business, and I understand that this has been the case 
everywhere where prohibition has been put into 
effect. 

H. B. WRIGHT, 

Northwest Exhibitors Circuit, Inc., 

Seattle, Washington. 


Of No Material Benefit 

Inasmuch as Indiana has been dry for nearly two 
years we feel that we are able now to state what has 
been the result, and not have to surmise what the 
future will bring forth. In our opinion the effects 
of prohibition is of no material benefit in the way of 
increased attendance at picture shows. Whilst it is 
true that those who had formally spent a portion of 
their income at the saloons and clubs saved temporally 
the amount they formally spent, but at once there were 
many avenues opening up that furnished ample oppor¬ 
tunities for the spending of the surplus. Shortly after 
Indiana went dry we missed a great many familiar 
faces of women and children who were good attendants 
at picture shows. Upon investigation we found that 
these people were remaining at home. As one person 
explained to the writer, “John used to go up town 
after supper and myself and children went to the 
picture show but now John stays home at night and 
we feel that we ought to stay with him, which we 
have been doing.” 

Whilst business has been improving of late we 
credit it to the returned soldiers, who are not only 
constant patrons themselves but they are invariably 
accompanied with one or more friends, and to the 
generally prosperous condition of our the U. S. A. 

We see no real improvement that we feel can be 
credited to prohibition. 

O’DONNELL-ESKRIDGE AMUSEMENT CO, 

Washington, Ind. 


Will Be a Great Thing 

The introduction of prohibition in this country will 
prove a great boon to the motion picture business. 
Springfield has been dry for two years and business 
has increased at every theater in the city. Men who 
used to spend their time in saloons now bring their 
wives and families to the theater. Prohibition will be 
a great thing for pictures. 

W. W. WATTS, 

The Yaudette Amusement Co. 

Springfield, Ill. 


Receipts Sure to Increase 

In Michigan prohibition has been put to a test. Its 
effect on the Moving Picture Industry has likewise 
made itself felt. I wish to go on record as saying 
that Moving Picture Exhibitors in any vicinage where¬ 
in prohibition has been put into effect may rest 
assured that their receipts will increase anywhere from 
twenty to thirty per cent. 

HERB L. WEIL, 

Family Theater, Port Huron, Michigan. 


Sees Increased Business 

In this section of the country we have not, of course, 
been up against the prohibition condition as yet, so 
that there is absolutely nothing aside from observation 
and deduction upon which to base a conclusion. Pro¬ 
hibition, as I see it, can mean nothing other than a 
decided increase in patronage for motion picture the¬ 
aters and all amusement enterprises. 

L. W. BARCLAY, 

Mgr. Grand Amusement Co., Inc., 

Johnstown, Pa. 








KENNETH WEBB 


NOW DIRECTING 


ALICE BRADY 


FOR REALART PRODUCTIONS 


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Pictures Instead of Saloons 

I do not think there is any doubt but what prohibi¬ 
tion will have the effect of increasing the attendance 
at motion picture theaters. This will be so for two 
reasons. 

First, the man who has been in the habit of spend¬ 
ing his evening in the corner saloon will now have 
no place to go but the moving picture house. 

Second, the money that he has been spending at the 
corner saloon will now go toward paying the admission 
fee for his entire family at the motion picture theater. 

This will be true of the smaller towns and cities 
more than in the big cities. 

I look for a very prosperous year ahead for the 
motion picture theaters and the entire film industry. 

W. E. SHALLENBERGER, 

Arrow Film Corp. 


Add 15 Per Cent, to Income 

National prohibition will add at least 15% to the 
income of the motion picture theaters of the country, 
or almost enough to pay the total film rental bill of 
the exhibitors of America. The average man and his 
family will spend a goodly portion of the money that 
previously went to the cafes and saloons at the theater, 
the opera, the motion picture house, the recreation 
park. It has been noted that the man even slightly 
under the influence of intoxicants does not patronize 
the picture theater; it is a class of amusement against 
which his alcoholic condition rebels. This man, sob¬ 
ered by constitutional law will not only turn to the 
picture shows to spend the time he previously loitered 
around the corner saloon, but his family will spend 
the money he saves by his abstinance for diversion 
and entertainment. 

P. W. WELLS, 

Howard-Wells Amusement Co. and 
Bijou Amusement Co., Inc., Wilmington, N. C. 


Little Effect 

Prohibition will have little, if any effect on the film 
industry during the coming year. 

Careful tabulation reveals the fact that it has had 
no bearing on our business In Detroit, although we have 
been “dry” for about two years. 

I appreciate that it is the usual thing to say “that 
it is helping greatly,” but I cannot see that it has had 
any effect either way on the situation. 

JOHN H. KUNSKY, 
Detroit, Michigan. 


Prohibition and Censorship 

Prohibition will be a great boom to the motion pic¬ 
ture industry. It is the only channel left in which 
the American public can dissipate a little small change. 

I sincerely hope that the impetus given to the busi¬ 
ness by reason of prohibition will not be offset by the 
ever increasing demand for censorship which is being 
daily fanned into a larger flame by unclean pictures. 

Censorship is not COMING any longer—it is HERE. 
It is a nip and tuck race between something good for 
the box office and something bad. 

CHAS. C. PETTIJOHN, 


Sees Business Increase 

We own and control five theaters in four towns In 
Indiana and Illinois which have recently gone (partly) 
dry and frankly say that business increased about 30%. 
I have the figures and have to admit it. 

THE MERIDIAN AMUSEMENT CO, 

F. G. Heller, Managing Director, 

Anderson, Indiana. 


Helped Some 

While the present prohibition law has hardly been 
in effect long enough to make an intelligible reply 
relative to the business, there is no question but what 
it has helped to some extent, as our business during 
the summer was better than last. Personally I think 
it will be several months before one can consistently 
make the proper prediction. 

JACK F. TRUITT, 

Sedalia Theater. 


Work to Serve Public 

Prohibition will be a direct help to increased box 
office receipts only in proportion to what other lines of 
business are benefited by the booze money going to 
other channels. 

However, looking over records of six years in which 
a city was wet two years, dry two years, and then wet 
again my business was better during the wet period. 
But this was before the whole country was dry and 
it may make a difference. 

In my humble opinion during the summer months our 
strongest competition is the automobile and daylight 
saving law. 

I can see no rosy road to success which any condi¬ 
tion of general business may bring. 

One of my most successful years in the amusement 
business was during the period of business depression 
in all other lines. People sought amusements not only 
for the purpose of recreation but also for the purpose 
of forgetting their troubles. 

I believe that more entertainment will be needed to 
supply the social hours that were taken with the 
elbow on the mahogany and foot on the brass rail. 

At the same time it is doubtful whether anything 
on earth can supplement the moments of good fellow¬ 
ship that come with a ginfizz or highball. 

The way to play safe is for the whole industry to 
work to serve the public with greater effort than ever. 
As we serve so shall we succeed. 

FRANK REMBUSCH, 
Motion Picture Exhibitors of America. 


Theaters Replace Saloons 

The effect of prohibition on the film industry during 
the coming year, briefly stated, will be the erection of 
numerous small motion picture theaters on property 
heretofore devoted to the saloon. This, in order to 
protect the property owners investment, and the motion 
picture theater is the only logical and sure proposition. 

The increased attendance at motion picture theaters 
by men who heretofore devoted their evenings to the 
saloon, the cafe and the dance hall where liquor was 
served. 

Because of this increased attendance a greater public 
interest in motion picture productions, and as a natural 
outcome of that a more active participation on the 
part of the public in the affairs of the industry. The 
reversion to the day of the 5c motion picture in small 
communities. The elimination of vaudeville in houses 
now devoted in part to vaudeville and motion pictures, 
and as a substitute for such eliminated vaudeville, there 
will be enlarged orchestras and musical specialties. 

The use of the motion picture theater as a part of 
the entertainment by lecturers and those heretofore 
appearing on Chatauqua Circuits. The increase in 
price of the higher class motion picture theater; but 
possibly one of the most radical effects of the inaugura¬ 
tion of prohibition will be the midnight performance as 
a regular procedure in certain theatei’s located in the 
larger cities. 

WM. L. SHERRILL, 
Frohman Amusement Corp. 








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Ask any First National 

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Thirst for Pictures 


Cannot Fail to Be of Advantage 


Prohibition is bound to create a tremendous thirst— 
for moving pictures. 


R. H. COCHRANE, 
Vice President, Universal Film. 


Creating Patronage 

There is no doubt that the prohibition will have a 
world wide effect in creating a bigger patronage for 
the motion picture theaters. 


HARRY RAPF, 
Selznick Pictures. 


Increased Receipts 

The effect of prohibition on the film industry during 
the coming year will be felt by every phase of busi¬ 
ness—felt in terms of dollars and cents. Particularly 
will the picture theaters feel the effects of prohibition 
—by increased box office receipts. As a matter of fact, 
increased attendance in picture theaters in the states 
that went dry last year have given a fairly clear 
indication of what national prohibition will mean to 
the picture theaters throughout the country. 

LEE A. OCHS, 
United Theaters. 


The motion picture theater has always been the 
consistent opponent of the saloon. The advent of the 
picture showhouses has resulted in a decrease of liquor 
stores and poolrooms throughout the country. 

The effect of prohibition cannot fail to be of advan- 
tage to the industry aside from the moral considera¬ 
tions, because money that still has been spent in 
saloons will in a large degree flow naturally to the 
theaters. 

People must have entertainment. The saloon has 
been called “the poor man’s club.” Why not call the 
picture theater the poor man’s club—as well as the 
wealthy man’s? 

In the production of pictures there can be no detri¬ 
mental effect from the enactment or prohibition be¬ 
cause the pictures of today are on a plane that has 
forever been lifted above the necessity of employing 
liquor as even a contrasting effect, it may still be 
used—pictures are not necessarily confined to the 
present day and age. For odious comparison it may 
offer certain advantages. 

But even if we had to do away with it altogether 
it would still be possible to make pictures that any 
and everyone would enjoy. If there cannot be—for 
example—vampires without liquor—let us dispense- 
with vampires—and so on. 

JESSE L. LASKY, 

First Vice President, 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 


Up to Exhibitors 

What effect is prohibition going to have on the 
theater? 

In those cities where prohibition has been a fact 
for the past year or so, (Detroit, Toronto, etc.) the 
theaters have enjoyed additional prosperity. The 
diversion that men have found in bars, cafes and 
saloons, will be substituted by the clean wholesome 
and inspiring influence of the modern photoplay the¬ 
ater. Many men will spend more time with their 
families and together they will journey forth to their 
favorite theater. 

It is up to the exhibitors of the country to make 
their theaters and entertainment so attractive, so that 
the newly “created patrons” will never miss the foot 
rail. 

HAROLD B. FRANKLIN, 
Managing Director, Shea’s Hippodrome, 

Buffalo, N. Y. 


Anticipate Benefits 

I think the effect will be remarkably good. There 
is no question in my mind that fifty per cent, of 
the money spent on booze will find its way into the 
box office of the moving picture theater. 

In spite of what the world says, that the wealthy 
support the distilleries from my personal experience 
as a settlement worker in New York, I know that 
the distilleries are supported by the poor man and the 
middle class man. Now then, if they have no saloon 
to go to, no back room of a saloon to sit and play 
cards, it gives the wife an opportunity to make home 
life more pleasant, to become better acquainted with 
her husband and in this way promote a friendly rela¬ 
tionship in family life. The natural result is that this 
man instead of sitting about with a bunch off cronies 
drinking booze, he will take his family to the moving 
picture theater and spend a pleasant evening. 

I. BERNSTEIN, 
National Film Corp. 


Means Bigger B. O. Receipts 

The experiences of exhibitors wuth prohibition in 
states that went dry before the Federal War Time 
act became effective are the best criterion of what bene¬ 
fits national prohibition wfill have for the motion pic¬ 
ture industry. 

Reports from territories that were dry before July 1. 
showed that box office receipts have increased approxi¬ 
mately 25% with saloons closed. This gain in patron¬ 
age is almost certain to result in territories that were 
wet up to June 30. 

Exhibitors w’ho are closely in touch with local con¬ 
ditions are the most efficient judges of sources for new 
revenue. In Michigan many theater owners who were 
avowedly “wet” deliberately worked for prohibition be¬ 
cause of the certainty that the elimination of bar 
rooms would put motion picture theaters in the fore¬ 
front of popularity as places w’herein to spend evenings. 

J. D. WILLIAMS, 

Manager, First National. 


“Dry” Towns Worst Show Towns 

Prohibition, unfortunately, is not a material help to* 
the show business. In the beginning one notices an 
increase in business—that is while the pleasure-seeking 
male element is still “milling” around for excitement. 
But in the end it is a notorious fact that “dry towns” 
are the wmrst show’ tow’ns on the map. Kansas has 
long been dubbed the “death trail” for road shows. 
Personally I have jumped a theatrical company of 
sixty-five people all the way from Trinidad, Colorado 
to Perry, Oklahoma right through the glorious state of 
Kansas, and only because conditions were unbearable 
and prospects even in the best towns of (he Ktate so 
bad that we didn’t dare take a chance. And the show 
was a good one, too. 

ROBT. W. PRIEST, 

Film Clearing Mart.. 










DAVID G. FISCHEPw — 

Director ofWhere Bonds are Loosed ” 

PRODUCED BY WALDO ftp PHOTOPLAYS INC. 

Distributed by W’ORLD 


mmmm 








































Business Improved 

Omt hdre in Nebraska we have been desert-like for 
over a year now. Business has been improved by pro¬ 
hibition greatly and now we don’t know what it is to 
eject a person. Any exhibitor who bemoans prohibi¬ 
tion (except for his personal use) is barking up the 
wrong tree. At least that is what we have found out 
here. H. M. THOMAS. 


Expects Great Results 

About the effect of prohibition on the industry I 
car only say that I expect great results. As we all 
know and as history has taught us, people must have 
entertainment and some sort of diversion and if it is 
taken away from them in one way they look for it in 
other ways. I expect a record breaking year as every¬ 
thing points towards it. 

HUGO RIESENFELD. 


Thinking in Dollars 

There is no doubt that prohibition will increase 
exhibitors’ profits. 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK. 


More Theaters, Less Saloons 

Statistics show that almost as fast as picture thea¬ 
ters were built, saloons closed their doors. If I re¬ 
member rightly, as far back as 1912 there were 
nearly 500 less liquor licences issued in Greater New 
York than there had been the previous year. 

This was blamed on moving pictures. In other 
words, people who had been in the habit of frequent¬ 
ing saloons because they had no place else to go, soon 
found a congenial place to spend their time outside of 
the saloons. Now that the saloons have closed you 
will notice there is a marked increase already in pic¬ 
ture theater building. 

This answers in itself the question as to the effect 
of Prohibition on the film industry. 

THEODORE W. WHARTON. 


Business Improved 

I believe that 90 per cent of the exhibitors through¬ 
out the country feel that their business has been 
improved so far by prohibition. In the southern coun¬ 
tries, where I am interested, we have had prohibition 
for the past two or more years, therefore the present 
nation-wide prohibition act means no new situation 
in this territory. From an exhibitor’s standpoint, I 
don’t believe it advisable for the exhibitors to permit 
themselves to mix prohibition politics into the motion 
picture business: a neutral position would be best. 

JAKE WELLS, 
Richmond, Va. 


New Responsibility Added 

The motion picture business, already greatly stimu¬ 
lated by the attitude of returning prosperity following 
the war, will derive a tremendous advantage out of 
prohibition. Regardless of what attitude one may 
have toward prohibition, it is certain that an impar¬ 
tial observation of the fact must show that the im¬ 
mense amount formerly spent in liquor will in a large 
proportion hereafter go to amusement enterprises. 
Of this the film industry is by all odds the most exten¬ 
sive and most important. Certainly this added in¬ 
terest in motion pictures by the great population of 
the United States puts a new responsibility upon all 
of us to give the world motion pictures that are clean 
inspiring and fascinating.—SAMUEL GOLDWYN. 


Don’t Chortle 

Effects of prohibition fine at present, but would not 
chortle too soon as reformers released from that job 
will be busy with other alleged reforms that may 
include a censorship on motion pictures. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 


Will Materially Aid 

Although it is still early to judge the effects of pro¬ 
hibition the prospects are that it will very materially 
promote the motion picture industry. 

MACK SENNETT. 


Will Prove of Great Advantage 

There seems little doubt but that the effect of pro¬ 
hibition will prove of great advantage to the business. 
In practically all the districts where prohibition has 
gone into effect business in general is found to take 
on a more healthy appearance and merchants experi¬ 
ence an increase in sales. The saloon has always 
more or less been competition to the motion picture 
theater. With the former “poor man’s club” extinct, 
the motion picture theater will receive its share of 
the benefit following the wake of prohibition en¬ 
forcement. 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 


Sees Marked Improvement 

We are conducting Neighborhood Theaters and we 
can see a marked increase in attendance by men bring¬ 
ing their families to the shows now who did not before 
prohibition became effective here. In our opinion pro¬ 
hibition is a great help to the picture show industry 
in Texas. 

ED. FOY, 

Foy’s Neighborhood Theaters, 

Dallas, Texas. 


Should Benefit 

Inasmuch as we have been operating a theater in 
the arid depths of Kansas for some ten years, during 
which time this state has drifted from a semi-dry 
state to a state of total aridity, we would not be able 
to answer your letter with any degree of assurance. 

But, looking at the question as simply a matter of 
economics, we can not help but feel that the theaters 
will profit along with every other line of business 
because it is clear that if you remove any one line of 
business from our mercantile life the money spent in 
that line of business will naturally revert to other 
channels. A person does not have to have any great 
degree of imagination or intelligence to understand 
that this is absolutely true. Inasmuch as the imbib¬ 
ing of hard liquors was largely an effort to secure 
pleasure, it logically follows that those who spent 
money for that sort of pleasure may look for some 
other form of entertainment and if that is the case 
the motion picture business may expect to be benefited 
to a greater extent than some other businesses. 

STANLEY CHAMBERS, 
Palace Theater Company, Wichita, Kans. 


Will Gain Much 

I am not a prohibitionist, having been in the liquor 
business for many years, but in my opinion the show 
business in general especially the picture shows, have 
gained at least 50 per cent already, and no doubt will 
still gain in the future, and can only contribute this 
increase on account of prohibition. 

A. FISHER, 

Mgr. Gray Opera House, St. Anthony, Idaho. 












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Tel. 7773-7774 Bryant 

Turn your lobby into an art gallery with our artistic paintings of Film 

Stars. 

High-grade lobby display paintings on features for the State-right 
buyer and Producer. 

We issue no catalogue, each order receiving individual attention. 

KASSEL STUDIOS, Inc. 

Candler Building 220 West 42nd Street 

New York City 

We have made all the lobby display paintings for every special show¬ 
ing in the United States, on the “Daughter of the Gods,” “Cleopatra,” 
“Salome,” “Les Miserables,” “Common Clay,” “Infatuation,” “Heart of 
Humanity,” Mack Sennett’s “Bathing Girls” and many others too numerous 
to mention. 

Our paintings of stars adorn the lobbies of the finest theatres in this 
country, Europe and South America. 




iHiHiiiiMiiiiiimMUMiiiHMimwwiwwmwMiiMmiiMHMiMiWMMUuiiimwromMmiHiiniMWW 


The Submarine Film Corporation 

J. E. WILLIAMSON, Gen. Mgr. 

LONG ACRE BUILDING 
NEW YORK CITY 


ORIGINATORS AND 
SOLE PRODUCERS OF 
SUBMARINE MOTION 
PICTURES 




OPERATING UNDER THE 
PATENTS OF THE 
WILLIAMSON SUBMARINE 
CORPORATION 


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Short Stuff 


Short Reel Display 

I consider the outlook for the short subject 
market in 1920 to be particularly favorable. 

During the past few years the public has rap¬ 
idly become “picture wise.” Padding, re-hashing 
plots that have grown old in the service, intro¬ 
duction of by-play, descriptive scenes and devices 
that tend to lengthen films but thin out the ac¬ 
tion, are no longer able to hold up their end with 
the public as they once were. In my opinion the 
public wants a more concentrated and more vi¬ 
rile form of entertainment, combined with beauty, 
variety and improved photography. The whole 
tendency of our modern life is to concentrate on 
the best and pass over the obvious and the ir¬ 
relevant. 

In my opinion, short subjects, whether they are 
educational, comedy, drama or novelties, will find 
an increasing demand throughout the year. We 
intend to follow this policy almost exclusively 
during 1920. By giving our patrons concentrated 
portions of pure beauty in Nature’s color, I feel 
that we will be in harmony with the coming de¬ 
mand. Stop motion, microscopic studies, uncon¬ 
ventional treatment of scenic and educational ma¬ 
terial, both as to subject and as to photography, 
when well done are the kind of pictures that 
never fail of appreciation by even the most criti¬ 
cal audiences. 

WILLIAM V. D. KELLEY, 
Technical Advisor of Prizma. 


Universal 

TN the coming year Universal will always have 
two and maybe more serials in the market for 
release. At this time the Corbett serial, “Elmo 
The Mighty,” “The Red Glove,” and “The Lure 
of the Circus” are in the exchanges. Four new 
serials were started before September 15. These 
are: “Wits and the Woman,” “The Petals of Pao 
Tze,” which will be made in Japan, “The Man 
Hunter” and “The Strange Case of Cavendish.” 
Universal releases three news weekly films each 
week. An original and high grade weekly re¬ 
lease is the Screen Magazine. The latest styles, 
scientific discoveries, new dances, and comedy 
sketches are offered. Thirty newspapers co-op¬ 
erate with Universal on this release. Universal 
will reUase four brands of comedies for the com¬ 
ing year: “Lyons-Moran comedies, bi-weekly, 
the Okeh comedies, bi weekly, the Rainbow brand 
and the Century animal comedies. At present 
Universal is releasing one two-reel Western sub¬ 
ject each week. This will continue for the com¬ 
ing year. In addition to the two reel Westerns a 
series of new Joe Martin comedies will be pro¬ 


duced. Major Jack Allen will make three animal 
pictures for Universal next year. From time to 
time Universal will release short subject specials 
such as “Sinbad the Sailor,” and the Pershing pro¬ 
duction “Pershing, the Weapon of Destiny.” 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 

In the short subject field Famous Players- 
Lasky will have a varied list of comedies, scenics 
and magazine productions. Beginning Sept. 1st 
Famous Players released Paramount-Briggs com¬ 
edies; Paramount-Burton Holmes Travelogues; 
Paramount-Post Nature Pictures; Ring Lardner 
comedies; a new series of Paramount-De Haven 
two-reel comedies, and the Mack Sennett and 
Fatty Arbuckle comedies. The Paramount mag¬ 
azine is produced by the Educational Depart¬ 
ment. The Burton Holmes Travelogues will be 
released weekly. 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation 

y 

Goldwyn will have more short reel releases the 
coming season than any previous year. Coming 
months will bring a marked development in the 
Goldwyn-Bay pictographs, the Bray studios will 
release three reels a week. Bray cartoons will be 
made in colors. The Bray Fantasy was first re- r 
leased in October. A new serials of “Smiling 1, 
Bill” Parson comedies will be produced and the 
Ford News weekly, that has proven so popular 
with the small town exhibitor, will be continued. 

Arrow Film Corporation 

The Arrow Film Corp., who deal mainly in 
short releases, will have a large supply of this ma¬ 
terial for release the coming season. These are 
“Lightning Brice,” a fifteen episode serial, “The 
Masked Rider” in 15 episodes, “The Lone Star 
Western Dramas,” “Blazed Trail Productions,” 
“Northwood Dramas,” “XLNT Comedies,” 
“Hank Mann Comedies,” “Sunbeam Comedies,” 
and “Arrow Comedies.” 

- !*• ’ 

United Picture Theaters 

! I, 

United will release monthly a series of 
“Cuckoo” comedies produced by Mark M. Dinten- 
fass. 


Fox news is the latest news weekly to be put on 
the market and will be edited by Herbert E. Han¬ 
cock. Pell Mitchell, formerly with the Gaumont 
weekly, will be news editor. Fox news will work 
in co-operation with the United Press. The Bud 
Fisher Mutt and Jeff comedies will be continued 
as weekly releases by Fox while the Sunshine 
comedies are also to be continued. 

‘ ' P/'T!*?LA'"' 1 













ON 








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*ACt 


&£R in THt 


THE BOOMERANG with Henry B Walthall 
“AT ONEMENT with Grace Davison & ConwayTearle 
“THE LONG ARM OF MANNISTER withHenry B. Walthall 
“THE 5INS OF THE CHILDRENwithStuartHolmese-AlmaHanlon 
“VIRTUOUS SINNERS ’With Wanda Hawley 
“THE GIRL FROM NOWHERE with Cleo Madison & Wilfred Lucas 
“THE HIDDEN CODE with Grace Davison 
“5USPIGI ON with Grace Davison 
“THE STILL ALARM-WIVES OF MEN with Florence Reed 


ONE A WEEK 


the“FACTS'&FOLLIES’series 


OTHERS rN, PREPARATION 


FIFTY TWO A YEAR 


PIONEER FILM CORP 

130 West 46!iST. New York City 

ALWAYS IN THE MARKET TO PURCHASE THE BEST INDEPENDENT PRODUCTIONS 
























Independent Exchanges—What They Handle 


Any omissions in the following list of exchanges and the product they distribute are due to the 
failure of concerns to supply reports. 


ATLANTA, GA — 

Consolidated Film & Supply Co., Ill 

Walton St.—Zeppelin’s Last Raid, Those 
Who Pay, Her Fighting Chance, The Bel¬ 
gian, Crucible of Life, The Prodical Wife, 
and the entire Universal output for the 
South. 


Criterion Film Service,—Master Mystery, 
The Carter Case, The Grain of Dust, The 
Huns Within Our Gates, Five Nights, Key¬ 
stone Re-issues, Two-Reel Westerns, Topi¬ 
cal Tips, The Deemster. 

Slpe Film Company, 67-A Walton St.— 
The Demons Shadow Serial, The Rise and 
Fall of the Confederacy. 


Film Distributing Co., Moore Bldg.— 
Short series subjects. Control for the 
Southeastern States, franchises on: Billy 
West Comedies, Gail Henry Comedies, 
Christie Single-Reel Comedies, Two-Reel 
Christie Specials, 24 One-Reel Fatty Ar- 
buckle Re-issues, 10 Warren Kerrigan Re¬ 
issues, 15 Shorty Hamilton Re-issues. 10 
single-reel Comedies produced by Bull’s 
Eye Film Corporation, featuring Napoleon 
and Sally, Two Monkeys. We are handling 
over this territory: The Submarine Eye, 
Who Shall Take My Life, Beware of 
Strangers, The Sin Woman, One Hour, 
The Fringe of Society, The Great White 
Trail, The Cast Off, One Law for Both. 
The Natural Law. 


Savlni Films, Inc., 63 Walton St.—Gau- 
mont Weeklies, Gaumont Pictorial, Gau- 
mont serial “The Hand of Vengence” ten 
episodes. Poppy Comedies featuring Mack 
Swain (Ambrose) one release every sec¬ 
ond week. _ “The Days of Daring” five 
parts featuring Tom Mix Sixteen two-reel 
western featuring Tom Mix, Fourteen one- 
reel western comedies featuring Tom Mix. 
Fifty-two Ham and Bud Comedies. The 
serial ’‘Stingaree” fifteen episodes. Pyramid 
two-reel comedies featuring Ray Hughes. 
“Woman”, Jester two-reel comedies featur¬ 
ing Twede-Dan. The Perfect Model, Forty 
Mutt and Jeff Cartoons, Shorty Hamilton 
five-reel Westerns. Handled for North 
and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Ala¬ 
bama and Tennessee; with the exceptions 
of Tennessee on the Gaumont Weeklies. 


Southeastern Pictures Corp., 61 Walton 
St.—Today, The Woman’s Law, The Mad 
Lover, The Lust of the Ages, The Straight 
Road, Satan’s Pawn, The Burning Silence, 
The Valley of the Night, Sinners Three, 
The Greyhound, The Barrier Between, The 
Road of Tears, The Profiteer, When The 
Desert Smiled, The Mysterious Mr. Brown¬ 
ing, Her Husband's Friend, 30 Two-Reel 
Thos. H. Ince Star Western Drama, 32 
One-Reel Unique Comedies, 22 One-Reel 
Chaplin Keystone Comedies, 40 One-Reel 
Tom Mix Western Comedy Features, 10 
or more One-Reel Arbuekle Keystone 
Comedies for theaters in North and South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Ten¬ 
nessee: 56 One-Reel Keystone Star Com¬ 
edies, 24 One-Reel Arbuekle Keystone Com¬ 
edies, 1 Two-Reel Arbuekle Keystone 
Comedy for theaters in North and South 
Carolina: 0 Two-Reel Sennett Keystone 
Specials, South Carolina. Georgia, Florida, 
Alabama, Tennessee; Monthly release of 
500 feet Patriotic Special features; “The 
Masked Rider, a typical Western serial; 
12 two-reel Lone Star Western Dramas, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama. Tennessee, Mississippi 
and Louisiana: Two-reel Sunbeam Com¬ 
edies for: North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, Mis¬ 


sissippi and Louisiana; Arrow Rainbow 
Comedies for: North Carolina, South Car¬ 
olina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennes¬ 
see, Mississippi and Louisiana. 


BALTIMORE, MD.— 

Variety Pictures Corp., 412 E. Baltimore 

St.-Special Features: The Echo of 

Youth, Ashes of Love, When Men Betray, 
Carmen of the Klondike, It May Be Your 
Daughter, Cleopatra, A Woman’s Law, Sun¬ 
set Princess, My Husband’s Friend, A 
Daughter of War, Lonesome Trail, Life 
Without a Soul, When the Desert Smiled. 
William S. Hart, 8 Two-Reel Subjects; 
Midget, 3 Two-Reel Comedies; Jester, 3 
Two-Reel Comedies; Wharton, 6 Two-Reel 
Comedies; Jack Richardson—Anne Little, 
12 Two-Reel Buckskin Westerns; Unique, 
32 Single-Reel Comedies; The Liberator, 15 
Two-Reel Kay Bees. 


BOSTON, MAS8.— 

Federal Feature Film Corp., 48 Piedmont 

St.—Fducational Subjects: Robert C. 
Bruce’s Scenics Beautiful, Ditmars’ Living 
Book of Nature, Internationl Cartoon Com¬ 
edies, Dwight L. Elmendorf’s Travel Pic¬ 
tures. Master Mystery, serial 15 episodes, 
Rolfe Productions, Inc.: Starring Hondini 
Margaret Marsh, Ruth Stonheouse; Silent 
Mystery, serial 15 episodes, Silent Mystery 
Co.: Starring Francis Ford. Rosemary 
Theby, Mae Gaston; Carter Case, serial 15 
episodes, Oliver Films Inc.: Starring Herb¬ 
ert Rawlinson, Margaret Marsh; Masked 
Rider, serial 15 episodes. Masked Rider 
Film Co.: Starring, Ruth Stonehouse, 
Harry Meyers, Paul Panzer. The Premier 
Feature Film Corp.: Finger of Justice, 
Crane Wilbur; The Profiteer, Jack Sherill 
and Alma Hanlon; American Was Right, 
All Star Cast; Photoplay Magazine Screen 
Supplement; 12 releases one a month; Uni¬ 
que Comedies, one-reel Slap-stick Comedies. 


Major Film, Inc., 10 Piedmont St.—The 
She Wolf, Texas Guinan; Reclaimed, Mabel 
Julien Scott and Niles Welch; Echo of 
Youth, Leah Baird and Charles Richmond; 
One to Every Man, Mabel Withee and Jack 
Sherrill; Mothers of Liberty, Barbara 
Castleton and Walter Miller; Lion of the 
Hills, William S. Hart; Lonesome Trail, 
William S. Hart; Y. D. Parade, Special; 
Two-reel Westerns (26 in all), Texas 
Guinan; 12 Two-Reel Westerns Re-Issues, 
J. Warren Kerrigan; 12 Two-Reel West¬ 
erns Re-issues, Anna Little: 12 Two-Reel 
Sunbeam Comedies, Fatty Filbert; Satan 
on Earth, Novelty; 35 Spanuths Vodavil; 
26 Mack Swain Comedies; Gaumont Pic¬ 
torial Life, one every week; 4 Two-Reel 
Comedies, Female Impersonator, Charlie 
Chaplin. 


Eastern Feature Film Co., Tnc., 57-59 
Church St.—The Still Alarm, Wives of Men 
with Florence Reed, Struggle Everlasting 
with Florence Reed, The Prodigal Wife a 
Screencraft Production, Accidental Honey¬ 
moon with Robert Warwick, Nine-Tenths 
of the Law with Mitchel Lewis, Devil’s 
Playground with Vera Michelena, Crucible 
of Life with Grace D'Armond, The Liber¬ 
ator Serial, Tom Mix 16 two-reelers, Vir¬ 
tuous Men just purchased, When Desert 
Smiled purchased an Arrow feature. 

Trimount Film Exchange Co., 12 Pied¬ 
mont St., Boston Mass.—The Hand That 
Rocks the Cradle, Sunset Princess. Corrup¬ 
tion, Grand Passion, God’s Law, Lonesome 
Trail, also Ham and Bud comedies, Snake- 
ville Comedies, Pokes & Jabes, and many 
single reel Essanay, Biograph, Edison and 
Selig Dramas. 


way-Special prod S 
Mickey, Rallies, The Public Defender Rol 
rlhoJ-Hn 11 ’ ¥ othe 1 r > The Mormon Maid’ The 
Pee th L °« a y, TT When Destiny Wills 
Life The u S * ea ’ „ Humi lity, Staking His 
Life, The Master Crook, William S Hart 

Frar T al,uad e?. Douglas Fairbanks 

HamiR erie T^ tty ^^uckle 8 keries,'Shorty 

1"™% Jungle comedies, single Reefwest-' 

tures bUbjeCtS ’ Duting-Chester Travel Pic- 


Auction of Souls, Daddy Lone I eo-a vint,. 
Fists, Woman’s Fool, Hell Bent Riders 

|KSV> ssS? S 

Exnufs’ 

ite Thief, Wicked Darline t j 

ipaA wig, c^S e ^t°'v 0 V£&i 

cenc<?° dS Destroy > Home, Price of Inn™ 


BUFFALO, N. Y_ 


w«v aik ' Y ' a ?, d - 9 ,inton Ave - aBd Droad- 
Ber l n A Th i 1 Rr^ 1Ck / y ’ „ Tan kpe Doodle In 
B 4 rth °/ a Rai ‘ e * The Two-Gun 
Man in the Bargain (Wm. S. Hart) The 

TWtu° Un u It ARlska <Wm. S. Hart), The 
Bandit and the Preacher (Wm. S TTart) 

Staking His Life (Wm. S. Hart) Satan’s 
Ra "\ n / Ressle Barriscale), The Straight 
Road (Chas. Ray and Barriscale), One 
Day, How Molly Made Good, The Birth of 
Man, The Salamander, The Birth of Char¬ 


acter, Heart of New York, The Real Roose¬ 
velt, Satan on Earth, Custer's Last Fight, 
The Hand of Vengeance Gaumont’s Special 
serial In ten two-reel episodes. The 
Demon’s Shadow (Arrow’s Special serial 
in ten two-reel episodes, 28 Keystone Eagle 
Brand one-reel Comedies, 28 Keystone Lib¬ 
erty Brand one-reel Comedies, 29 Charlie 
Chaplin Comedies, 28 Mack Sennett Key¬ 
stone Comedies. 36 Fatty Arbuekle Com¬ 
edies, 24 Billy West Comedies, 16 Shorty 
Hamilton Westerns, 18 Wm. S. Hart two- 
reel Westerns, 15 Kay Bee Union Brand 
Westerns, 15 Kay Bee Columbia Brand 
Westerns. 


CHICAGO, ILL_ 

First National Exhibitors Exchange, 110 
State St.—All First National Attractions: 
Stolen Orders, Whom the Gods Would 
Destroy, The Kaiser’s Finish. Raffle’s, The 
Whip, The Italian Battle Front, A Mormon 
Maid, Redemption, The Crisis, Parentage, 
The Submarine Eye, On Trial, Enlighten 
They Daughter, Beware of Strangers, The 
Masque of Life, Idle Wives, Where Are 




SIDNEY REYNOLDS 

Presents 

The most AMAZING person¬ 
ality who has ever invaded 
the screen. 

One who is KNOWN to mil¬ 
lions through his astounding 
stage career. 


J. ROBERT 

PAULINE 


The hypnotic sensation of 
the vaudeville stage in a 

SERIES 

of 

SUPER 

SERIALS 

Supported by all-star casts 


Supreme Pictures, Inc. 

101 WEST 42nd STREET 
NEW YORK 

























My Children, 20,000 Leagues Under the 
Sea, The Sign Invisible, Empty Pockets, 
The Frozen Warning, Alimony, Passing of 
the Third Floor Back, Fall of the Roman¬ 
off’s, A Modern Lorelei, Frank Keenan and 
Norma Talmadge Reissues. 


Pay The Burning Silence^ The Greyhound, The Imperial Film Co., 1911% Commerce 
Road of Tears Sinners Three Barrier Be- St„—The Masque of Life (Texas, Oklahoma, 
tween, The Valley of the Night. Tom Mix Arkansas), Modern Lorelei (Texas, Okla- 
Single-Reel Westerns, Ham and Bud Sin- homa, Arkansas, Louisiana 
gle-Reel Comedies, The Demon Shadow 
Serial, The Masked Rider Serial. 


Atlas Educational Film Co., 63 E. Adams 
St.—A Grain of Wheat, Hawaiian Is¬ 
lands, Agricultural Pursuits, Opening of 
Flowers, Fable of Small Town Favorite, 
Fable of Napoleon and the Bumps, Fable 
of the High Roller and the Buzzing 
Blonde, The New Teacher, Rev. Salaman¬ 
der, Unattached; A Little Louder, Please; 
Mile a Minute Monty, Dreamy Dud, 
Cowboy—Canimated News, Call of Yes¬ 
terday— Bryant Washburn, Lumbering 
in New Brunswick—Asbestos for a Thou¬ 
sand Years, Dawn of a New Era in Elec¬ 
trical Railroading, Hawaiian Islands, Peo¬ 
ple and Customs, St. Augustine—Roosevelt 
Dam, China and the Chinese, Verdi Canyon, 
Arizona, and Vernon Bailey’s S. B. of Ber¬ 
lin, Roosevelt Dam and Vernon Howe 
Bailey’s S. B. of Boston, Winter Sports 
in Quebec, Vernon Howe Bailey S. B. of 
London, Chicago to San Diego and Ver¬ 
non Howe Bailey’s S. B. of San Francisco, 
Top of the World in the Canadian Rockies, 
Nature’s Children, Jeal and Sisera, Alkali 
Ike’s Pants—Augustus Carney, Alkali Ike 
Stung—Augustus Carney, Cupid’s Quartet 
—Smiling Billy Mason, Three Two One, 
Captain Jinks—Evolution—Frank Daniels, 
Captain Jinks—Plumber—Frank Daniels— 
The Patent Food Conveyor, The Ranch 
Girl’s Mistake—G. M. Anderson (Broncho 
Billy), The Loafer’s Mother—G. M. Ander¬ 
son (Broncho Billy), The Little Sheriff— 
G. M. Anderson (Broncho Billy), Western 
Hearts—G. M. Anderson (Broncho Billy), 
Signal Lights—Francis X. Bushman, The 
Old Wedding Dress—Francis X. Bushman 
and Beverly Bayne, White Roses—Francis 
X. Bushman, Historic Boston, Salmon 
Fishing in New Brunswick and Vernon 
Howe Bailey’s S. B. of St. Louis, Journey 
Across Canada, Canyon de Chelley and 
Vernon Howe Bailey’s S. B. of Philadel¬ 
phia, Canada to the Gulf, New York City, 
A Visit to India in a Missionary Boat, The 
Republic of Mexico, Scenes in Every Land, 
Primitive and Modern Methods of Farming, 
Corn Harvesting—Last of the American In¬ 
dian, Uncle Sam’s Navy, Uncle Sam’s 
Army, Winter Sports in America, Shells 
and Shivers, Capt. Jink’s Dilemma—Frank 
Daniels, Capt. Jink’s Wife’s Husband— 
Frank Daniels, Capt. Jink’s Baby—Frank 
Daniels, Capt. Jink’s Alibi—Frank Daniels, 
Losing Weight—Hughey Mack, An Unex¬ 
pected Romance, Her Hour of Triumph, 
Her Adopted Father, The Return of 
Becky, The Magic Wand, A Western Prince 
Charming. 


Features: Working of a Miracle, 3 reels; 
Sting of Victory, Henry Walthall, 5 reels; 
The Raven (Edgar Allen Poe’s Book), 5 
reels; Capt. Jinks of the Horse Marines— 
Richard Travers and Ann Murdock, 5 reels; 
My Friend from India—Comedy, 3 reels; 
Seasons of Childhood—Little Mary McAllis¬ 
ter, 2 reels; Kingdom of Hope—Little Mary 
McAllister, 2 reels; On the Isle of Same— 
Drama, 2 reels; The Wonderful Wagner— 
Raymond Hitchcock—Comedy, 2 reels; 
Where Is My Mother—Little Mary McAllis¬ 
ter, 2 reels; Max Wants a Divorce—Max 
Linder Comedy, 2 reels; Max Comes Across 
—Max Linder Comedy, 2 reels; Rule 63— 
Bryant Washburn Comedy, 2 reels; Palace 
of the King—Richard Travers; Little Shep¬ 
herd of Bargain Row—Richard Travers 
and Sallie Fischer, 5 reels. Religious:— 
David and Absolom, 2 reels. 


United Photoplay Co., 207 S. Wabash 


Silee Film Exchange, 220 S. State St.— 
Paul J. Rainey’s Heart of the Jungle, Sus¬ 
picion, The Profiteer, Ashes of Love, Five 
Nights, City of Purple Dreams, Lust of 
the Ages, Whither Thou Goest, Should 
She Obey, A Slacker’s Heart. 


Bee-Hive Exchange, 207 S. Wabash Ave. 
—Handle nothing but short reel subjects 
of one or two reel lengths only. All Billy 
West Comedies released by the Bulls Eye 
Film Corp. All Gale Henry Comedies re¬ 
leased by the Bulls Eye Film Corp. All 
Scenics and Cartoon releases of Educa¬ 
tional Films. All Photoplay Magazine 
Screen Supplements of Educational Films 
Corp. and any other releases which they 
have from time to time. All releases of the 
single-reel Mack Swain Comedies of Froh- 
man Amusement. All releases of the two- 
reel Texas Guinan Westerns of Frohman 
Amusement. All releases of the single-reel 
Arbuckle Re-issued Comedies from W. H. 
and Tower Film. The Silent Mystery serial 
released by the Silent Mystery Corp. The 
Liberator serial with Maciste, released by 
Harry Raver. 


CINCINNATI, OHIO— 

Masterpiece Film Attractions, Film Ex¬ 
change Bldg.—The Cold Deck, The Bandit 
and the Preacher, The Two-Gun Man in 
the Bargain, The Hell Hound of Alaska, 
The Lust of the Ages, The Grain of Dust, 
Carmen of the Klondike, The Accidental 
Honeymoon, The Struggle Everlasting, The 
Garden of Allah, The Libertine, Redemp¬ 
tion, Beware of Strangers, The Spreading 
Evil, Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The Still 
Alarm, The Whip, Raffles, Rex Beach Two- 
Reel Travelogue, Tom Mix Specials Two- 
Reel Western Dramas. All Star Reel. 


CLEVELAND, OHIO— 

Masterpiece Film Attractions, Sincere 
Bldg.—Grain of Dust, Carmen of the Klon¬ 
dike, Struggle Everlasting, Accidental 
Honeymoon, Raffles, Spreading Evil, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The Whip, The 
Still Alarm. 


Sterling Film Service Co., 310 Sloan Bldg. 
—Denny from Ireland, Snail, Ranger, 
Blood of His Fathers, Her Bargain, Eye 
of Envy, Wives of Men, Finger of Justice, 
Husband’s Friend, Sins of Ambition, Bab¬ 
bling Tongues, Married in Name Only, 
Hand of Vengeance Serial, Wharton Com¬ 
edies, Are You Legally Married. 


DALLAS, TEXAS— 

B. D. Lewis Film Company, Inc., 1815% 
Main St.— One-Reel Christie Comedies, 24 
One-Reel Fatty Arbuckle Comedy Re¬ 
issues, Two-Reel Bullseye Comedies, One- 
Reel Tom Mix Re-issues, Gaumont Week¬ 
lies, The Masked Rider, One-Reel Vod-a-Vil 
Moovies. 


Southwestern Film Corp., 1911 % Com¬ 
merce St.—Master Mystery, Silent Mystery, 
Fagle’s Eye, Carter Case, Poppy Comedies, 
Miss Texas Guinan, Stolen Orders, Five 
Nights, Perfect Model, One-Reel Chaplin, 
Two-Reel Billy West Comedies, Two-Reel 
Wharton Comedies, Two-Red Jester Com¬ 
edies, Two-Reel Tom Mix, Two-Reel Wm. 
S. Hart, Two-Reel Jester Comedies, The 
Great White Trail, My Husband’s Friend. 


Consolidated Film A Supply Co., Inc., 
1900 Commerce St.—Texas agents for all 
films released by Universal, Jewel and 
Bluebird. 


OTiiuiOTH ouhpb rum vo,, commerce 

St.—Zeppelin’s Last Raid, The Belgian, 
Crucible of Life, Just a Woman, Her 
Fighting Chance, The Prodigal Wife, Those 
Who Pay. Chaplin Re-issued by W H. 
DENVER, COL.— 


First National Exhibitors' Circuit, Corp„ 

1518 Welton St.—Daughter of Destiny, 
Light Within, Life Mask, Tempered Steel, 
Panther Woman, Dog’s Life, Shoulder 
Arms, Sunnyslde, Alimony, Empty Pockets, 
Passing Third Floor Back, Still Alarm, 
Mothers of Liberty, Pershing’s Crusaders, 
Italy’s Flaming Front, Tarzan of the Apes, 
Romance of Tarzan, Trip Thru China, 
Four Years in Germany, America Is Ready, 
For Humanity’s Sake, Sealed Orders, Be¬ 
ware of Strangers, 20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea, On Trial, Cold Deck, Greater New 
York, Mighty London, War Bonnet Round¬ 
up, Where Are My Children, Sign Invisible, 
Idle Wives, Fall of the Romanoff’s, Span¬ 
ish Main, Captain Kidd, Pirate Haunts, 
Fighting Roosevelts, God’s Law, Whom the 
Gods Would Destroy, Price of Innocence, 
Auction of Souls, First National Releases, 
Mutt and Jeff, Jester Comedies. 


Midwest Civilization Co., Gas and Elec¬ 
tric Bldg.—Civilization, Stolen Orders, 
Raffles, The Amateur Cracksman, Parent¬ 
age, The Warrior, The Garden of Allah, A 
Modern Lorelei, Mickey. 


Supreme Photoplays Corp., 1446 Welton 
St.—Grain of Dust, Zongar, Sins of Ambi¬ 
tion, Wives of Men, Babbling Tongues, 
Married in Name Only, Once to Every 
Man, One Law for Both, The Window Op¬ 
posite, Virtuous Men. Short Subjects: 
24 Single-Reel Arbuckles, 28 Two-Reel 
Keystones, 16 Two-Reel Tom Mix, 52 Out¬ 
ing Chesters. 


DES MOINES, IOWA— 


Quality Attractions Company, Inc., Kraft 
Bldg.—Virtuous Sinners, The Boomerang. 


DETROIT, MICH.— 


Joe Horwitz Prod., 304 Joseph Mack 
Bldg.—Mickey, The Mad Lover, Today. 


Arthur S. Hyman Attractions, Film Bldg. 
—Wives of Men, Woman, Hearts of Men, 
Once to Every Man, When the Desert 
Smiled, Virtuous Men. 


Strand Features, 201 Film Bldg.—The 
Shadow of Fear, The Woman’s Lawi 
Human Shuttles, The House of Cards, Fires 
of Hopes, The Sunset Princess, The Web 
of Intrigue, The Battle of Gettysberg. The 
Gangsters of New York, The Still Alarm, 
A Modern Venus. 16 Two-Reel “Tom Mix 
Subjects, 27 Two - Reel Westerns 24 
Single-Reel Comedies Featuring Fatty 
Arbuckle, 22 Single-Reel Comedies Featur¬ 
ing Charlie Chaplin, 52 Single-Reel Ham 
and Bud Comedies. 


Ave..—The Echo of Youth, When Men 


Betray, The Finger of Justice, The Slave 
Mart, Tfie Pen Vulture, The Ranger, The 
Snail, Dennyf rom Ireland, The Guilty Wife, 
Accidental Honeymoon, The Struggle Ever¬ 
lasting, The Vigilantes, And the Children 


The True Film Co., 1911% Commerce St. 
—The Melting Pot (Texas), Beating Back 
(Texas), The Whip (Texas, Oklahoma, 
Arkansas), Babbling Tongues (Texas, Okla¬ 
homa,. Arkansas, Louisiana), Yankee Doodle 
in Berlin (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas), 


GREENVILLE, S. C.— 


Imperial Film Service.—Featuring short 
reel programs, with several five and aix 
reel features. 




John w. noble 

Director 

“ROMEO AND JULIET” 
“MY OWN UNITED STATES” 
“BIRTH OF A RACE” 


Great Neck Station, L. I. 






INDIANAPOLIS, IND.— 

Doll-Van Film Corp., 1606 Merchants 
Bank Bldg.—Hearts of the World, The Still 
Alarm, Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Wives 
of Men, Woman, Once to Every Man, Five 
Nights, Lion of the Hills, The Real Roose¬ 
velt, Surrender of the German Fleet, How 
Stars Twinkle Away from the Studio, Pa¬ 
triotic Short Reel Song Subjects, The Mad 
Lover, Today, The Cold Deck, Carmen of 
the Klondike, The Public Defender, .The 
Grain of Dust, Nine-tenths of the Law, 
Those Who Pay, The Crucible of Life, 
The Zeppelin’s Last Raid, The Belgian, 
Just a Woman, 16 Tom Mix Two-Reelers, 
14 One-Reel Tom Mix, 6 Fatty Filbert 
Comedies, Gaumont news and Graphic. 


The H. Lleber Co., 24 W. Washington 
St.—Controlling all First National produc¬ 
tion for Indiana, Empty Pockets, The 
Sign Invisible Third Floor Back, Daughter 
of Destiny, The Light Within, Life Mask, 
Tempered Steel, Panther Woman, Whom 
The Gods Would Destroy, Choosing a 
Wife, Land of the Rising Sun and 10 
single-reel Jap Travelogues. Topical Tips 
(released weekly), Outing Chester Pictures 
(Travelogues released weekly), Price of In¬ 
nocence, Kaiser’s Finish, Raffles, One Law 
for Both, Babbling Tongues, The Whip, 
The Crisis. 


KANSAS CITY. MO — 

' Standard Film Corp., Foley Bldg.—Fran¬ 
cis Ford’s 15-Episode Serial “The Silent 
Mystery,’’ 11 Single Reel Arbuckle Come¬ 
dies, Bessie Barriscale in Those Who Pay, 
29 Mack Sennett Keystone Comedies, Gau¬ 
mont News and Graphic, Pictorial Life, Just 
A Woman, the picture that stirs the soul; 
Victoria Cross’ Five Nights, Charlotte 
Walker in Men, Win. S. Hart, The Star Su¬ 
preme in three big, swift moving, grip¬ 
ping Thos. H. Ince productions. These 
are Hart’s masterpieces. Bruce Scenics, 
Educationals, Cartoon Comedies by the 
best authors, 16 two-reel Wm. S. Hart- 
Thos. H. Ince Productions. All prints from 
original negatives—copyrighted. 16 two- 

reel Tom Mix Westerns, 
i 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— 

All Star Features Distributing, Inc., 514 

W. 8th St.—Hearts of the World, Mickey, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The Unpardon¬ 
able Sin, Hearts of Men, Spreading Evil, 
The Spoilers, Parentage, The Still Alarm, 
The Grain of Dust, Nine-Tenths of the Law, 
The Struggle Everlasting, The Mad Lover, 
The Whip, The Garden of Allah, The Great 
White Trail, The Silent Witness, The 
Prince of Society, The Cast Off, Madame 
Sherry, The Accidental Honeymoon, Denny 
from Ireland, The Snail, The Ranger, The 
Crhcible of Life, Just a Woman, Those 
Who Pay, Zeppelin’s Last Raid, The Bel¬ 
gian, Carmen of the Klondike, Raffles, 
Today, Civilization, 20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea, The Sin Woman, Her Fighting 
Chance, The Submarine Eye, The Marriage 
Bond, The Natural Law, Surrender of the 
German Fleet, Actor’s Fund, Rex Beach 
Travelogue, The Real Roosevelt, They Shall 
Not Pass, Tom Mix Two-Reelers. 


The All Star Features Distributors, Inc., 

191 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 
and 514 W. 8th St., Los Angeles, Cal.— 
Has distributed the following: Griffith’s, 
Hearts of the World; Griffith’s, Intoler¬ 
ance; Griffith’s, Mother and the Law; 
Griffith’s, The Fall of Babylon; Mack Sen- 
nett’s, Mickey; Mack Sennett’s, Yankee 
Dopdle in Berlin; Garson’s, Unpardonable 
Sin; George Beban’s, Hearts of Men. 


LOUISVILLE, KY.— 

Big Feature Bights Corp., Nat’l Theatre 
Bldg.—The Unpardonable Sin, The Hushed 
Hour, Whom the Gods Would Destroy, 
Auction of Souls, Daddy Long-Legs, Tarzan 
of the Apes, The Romance of Tarzan, Vir¬ 
tuous Wives, A Midnight Romance, Mary 


Regan, The Price of Innocence, Beyond 
the Law, When the Desert Smiled, The 
Whip, The Kaiser’s Finish, A Dog’s Life, 
Shoulder Arms, Sunnyside, The Fighting 
Roosevelts, Italy’s Flaming Front, My 
Four Years in Germany, Choosing a Wife, 
Alimony, Babbling Tongues, Battle Cry of 
Peace, The Deemster, The Mad Lover, An 
Accidental Honeymoon, Empty Pockets, 
Fall of the Romanoffs, Married in Name 
Only, On Trial, The Struggle Everlasting, 
Today, A Woman’s Law, Marvelous Mac- 
iste, The Crisis, Joan the Woman, Garden 
of Allah, My Husband’s Friend Neptune’s 
Daughter, One Law for Both, Raffles, 
Whither Thou Goest, Daughter of Des¬ 
tiny, Light Within, Life Mask, Tempered 
Steel, The Panther Woman, Silver Threads 
Among the Gold, Sins of Ambition, Sign 
Invisible, Traitors Within the Gates, 
Trooper 44, Passing of the Third Floor 
Back, Two Men and a Woman, 4 Lock- 
wood-Allison Re-issues. 


MALONE, N. Y.— 

Princess Film Corp., Malone, N. Y.—My 
Husband’s Friend, Whither Thou Goest, 
Wrath of the Gods, Sunset Princess, God’s 
Man, The Natural Law. 


MEMPHIS, TENN.— 

Kaufman Specials, 52 S. Fourth St.— 
Five-Reel Shorty Hamilton Feature: Denny 
from Ireland, The Snail, The Ranger, The 
Pen Vulture, Harold Lockwood in Life’s 
Blind Alley, Charles Ray in The Straight 
Road, Bessie Barriscale in Satan’s Pawn, 
Tom Mix in the Days of the Thundering 
Herd, Earle Metcalfe in Race Suicide, Wm. 
S. Hart in The Bargain, Rhea Mitchell in 
Whither' Thou Goest, Kathlyn Williams in 
Sweet Alyssum, James Cruze in The Web 
of Life, Dorothea Farley in Are Passions 
Inherited. Short Reels, Patriotic Specials: 
The Star Spangled Banner, Columbia, The 
Battle Cry of Freedom and the Health- 
ogram releases, also the Rothacker Indus- 
trialogs. Re-issued serial A Daughter of 
Uncle Sam in twelve episodes. 


MILWAUKEE, WIS.— 

Mid-West Distributing Company, Toy 
Bldg.—Woman, 4 Loekwood-Allison Re¬ 
issues, Satan on Earth, Hearts of Men, 
Tempest and Sunshine, Tom Mix West¬ 
ern Two-reels, Master Mystery, Carter Case, 
Christie Comedies, Mack Swain Comedies, 
Texas Guinan Westerns, The She Wolf, 
Gaumont Weeklies, Gaumont Pictorial Life. 


Bee-Hive Exchange, 174 Second St.—Edu¬ 
cational Films, Gale Henry. Billie West 
Comedies, Liberator, Silent Mystery, num¬ 
erous Re-issues. 


Wisconsin Film Corp., 401 Toy Bldg.— 
The Birth or a Nation, Mickey, The Two- 
Gun Man, The Bargain, The Bandit and 
the Preacher, The Hell Hound of Alaska, 
Staking His Life, Carmen of the Klondike. 


MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— 

The Westcott Film Corp., 700 Film Ex¬ 
change Bldg.—Super Special: Intolerance. 
Specials: The Cossacks W T hip, The Law 
of the North, Kidnapped, The Deemster, 
The Warrior, A Modern Lorelei, The 
Masque of Life, A Mormon Maid, I Be¬ 
lieve, Loyalty. Midland Productions: The 
Ranger, The Pen Vulture, When Arizona 
Won. Features: The Lady of the Photo¬ 
graph, Courage of the Commonplace, Cy 
Whitacker’s Ward, The Awakening of Ruth, 
Light and Darkness, The Ghost of Old 
Morro, The Tell-Tale Step, The Buildings 
of Castles, the Royal Pauper, The Last 
Sentence, Salt of the Earth, Innocence of 
Ruth, The Magic Skin, The Bondwoman, 
Between Savage and Tiger, The Money 
Maker, The Green Cloak, The Danger Sig¬ 
nal, Wild Oats, The Scarlet Road, The 
Devil’s Prayer Book, Behind the Lines in 
Italy, The Final Curtain, My Husband’s 


Friend, Glory, Wrath of the Gods, The 
Battle of Gettysburg, Mother, Berlin via 
America, The Woman and the Beast, The 
Redemption of a Man, Humility, The Little 
Girl Next Door. Harry Watson Comedies: 
Single Reel Comedies. Flagg Comedies: 
Single Reel Comedies. Edison Conquest 
Pictures: Travelogues. George Kleine 
Classics. 


Standard Film Corp., 406 Film Exchange 
Bldg.—Two-Reel Wm. S. Hart’s; 3 Hart 
Specials: Bargain, Hell Hound of Alaska, 
and the Bandit and the Preacher; Birth 
of Democracy, Seven-Reel Special; It May 
Be Your Daughter, Seven-Reel Special; 
Two-Reel Mack Sennett Keystone’s; Two- 
Reel Billy West Comedies; Single-Reel 
Fatty Arbuckle Comedies; Bruce, Newman 
and Special Scenic’s; International Cartoon 
Comedies; The Photoplay Magazine Screen 
Supplement; Two-Reel Gale Henry Com¬ 
edies. 


TfA uu! irroauce Exchange. 

The Birth of a Nation, The Crisis, 
Ramona, Stolen Orders, Garden of Allah 
Submarine Eye, Public Defender, Five 
Nights, Cleopatra, Mothers of Liberty 
Whither Thou Goest, Zongar, Cold Deck! 
Little Orphan, On the Isonzo, Denny from 
Ireland, The Snail, The Ranger, Pen Vul¬ 
ture, Prisoner of War, Are You Legally 
Married?, Birth of a Race. 


William A. Lochren, Film Exchange 
Bldg.—Scenics, current news films and 
commercial reels. Northwest Weekly, a 
thousand foot news reel. 


Minnesota Metro Pictures Service, Inc., 

807-8-9 Produce Exchange—All productions 
released by Metro and Screen Classics, and 
God’s Man, starring H. B. Warner. 


Educational Film Co., 443 Loeb Arcade— 
Billy West comedies and the Napoleon 
and Sally comedies, released by Bulls Eye 
Film Corp. 


Supreme Film Productions, 518-19-20 
Mailers Building—God’s Man, featuring H. 
B. Warner for Indiana, Illinois and Wis¬ 
consin. 


Supreme System, Inc., 606 Film Exchange 
Rldg—Nine-Tenths of the Law, Raffles, 
The Amateur Cracksman, The Crucible of 
Life, The Devil’s Playground, The Woman’s 
Law, Chaplin Re-issues, The Hand of Ven¬ 
geance, The Silent Mystery Serials, Christie 
Comedies, Satan on Earth. 


NEW ORLEANS, LA.— 

First National Exhibitors Circuit, ! 712 

Poydras St.—The Frozen Warning, The 
Fall of the Romanoffs, Tarzan of the Apes, 
Passing of the Third Floor Back, Tem¬ 
pered Steel, Pershing’s Crusaders, Italy’s 
Flaming Front, Romance of Tarzan, Vir¬ 
tuous Wives, Five Million Dollar Counter¬ 
feiting Plot, Our Teddy, America Was 
Right, The Kaiser’s Finish, Midnight 
Romance, Auction of Souls, The Price of 
Innocence, Mary Regan, Choosing a Wife, 
Whom the Gods Would Destroy, Wives of 
Men, Daddy Long Legs, Human Desire, 
Unpardonable Sin, Sunnyside, Shoulder 
Arms. 


NEW YORK CITY— 

Merit Film Corp., 130 W. 46th St.—28 
Two-Reel Texas Guinan Subjects, 26 Two- 
Reel New Series Jester Comedies; 26 Pop¬ 
py Comedies, featuring Mack Swain, Texas 
Quinan in The She Wolf, five reels; Mit¬ 
chell Lewis in Fool’s Gold, Seven-Reels; 
Series of Kathryn Williams Animal Ad¬ 
venture Pictures; One Law for Both, Rita 
Jolivet; Conquered Hearts, Marguerite 
Marsh; Life or Honor, Leah Baird; The 
Unchastened Woman, Grace Valentine; The 



George Brackett Seitz 

M. P. D. A. 

Star, Director and Producer of his 
Greatest Serial 

“BOUND and GAGGED" 

By Frank Leon Smi'h 

Previous Successes: 

“THE FATAL RING” . , “THE LIGHTNING RAIDER” 

“THE HOUSE OF HATE” (Pathe) “ XHE BLACK SECRET” ^ ^ 



















"Window Opposite, Leah Baird; Babbling 
Tongues, Grace Valentine; David Copper- 
fled, All Star Cast; Sins of Ambition, Wil¬ 
fred Lucas and Barbara Castleton; Once 
to Every man, Jack Sherrill and Mabel 
Withee; The Faded Flower, Marguerite 
Snow; The Girl Who Did Not Care, James 
Morrison; A Modern Lorelei, Tyrone 
Power; Married in Name Only, Milton 
Sills; His Daughter Pays, Gertrude McCoy ; 
The City of Illusion, Mignon Anderson; 
Concealed Truth, Paula Shay; The Cloister 
and the Hearth, All Star Cast; Forbidden 
Fruit, Christine Mayo; Her Surrender, 
Anna Q. Nilsson; His Wives, Sally Crute; 
Heart of Midlothian, All Star Cast; Im¬ 
mortal Flame, Maude Fealy; A Mother’s 
Confession, Christine Mayo; The Monster 
of Fate; Old Curiosity Shop; Sins of the 
Parents, Mme. Sarah Adler; Should a 
Woman Divorce?, All Star Cast; Two Men 
and a Woman, James Morrison; Web of 
Intrigue, Harold Lockwood and May Alli¬ 
son; The Woman’s Law, Florence Reed; 
Human Clay, Mollie King. Special Release, 
in five parts: Texas Guinan in The She 
Wolf. Featuring J. Warren Kerrigan, two- 
reels: The Miser’s Undoing, The Terror 
of the Mountain, The Call of the Tropics, 
Bruce’s Triumph, Playing the Game, The 
Hidden Snare, A Soldier’s Courage, By 
Right of Heritage, For Her Hand, Facing 
Danger. Featuring Anna Little, two-reels: 
Luxury’s Lure, Prodigal Love, Western 
Honor, Canyon Romance, The Recognition, 
Wanted, Beyond Reproach, Fatal Return, 
Range Rider, Law of Hate, Lurking Dan¬ 
ger, Winning Loser. Serials: Francis 
Ford in The Silent Mystery, 15 episodes; 
Mitchell Lewis in The Demon’s Shadow, 
10 episodes; Earl Metcalf in Perils of Our 
Girl Reporters, 15 episodes; Series of 20 
New Mack Swain Comedies, single-reel. 


Parts), The Sage-Brush League (Five-Part 
Western baseball comedy). 


S. L. Pictures, 1476 Broadway, N. Y. 
City—Virtuous Men (E. K. Lincoln—Seven 
Parts). 

S. L. K. Serial Corp.— (Helen Holmes 
Serial “The Fatal Fortune”—Fifteen Epi¬ 
sodes.) 

Solitary Sin Corp.—The Solitary Sin 
(Jack Mulhall, Helene Chadwick, Pauline 
Curley). 


Southern Feature Film Co., 1476 Broad¬ 
way, N. Y. City.—Beyond the Law (Em¬ 
mett Dalton—Six' Parts). 


Territorial Sales Corp., 1600 Broadway, 
N. Y. City.—(Jester Comedies—Two Reels 
—Issued Twice a Month.) The Tenderfoot, 
A Mexican Mixup, The Wisest Fool, Gee 
Whiz! 


Maurice Tourneur Productions, 1476 
Broadway, N. Y. City — Sporting Life 
(through Famous Players-Lasky in United 
States and Canada.) Woman. The White 
Heather, through Famous Players-Lasky 
in United States and Canada). My Lady’s 
Garter, Broken Butterfly, Romany Rye. 


Tyrad Pictures, Inc., 729 Seventh Ave., 
N. Y. City—And the Children Pay, Your 
Wife and Mine (Seven Parts), Human Pas¬ 
sions (Six Parts), The Red Viper (Garret 
Hughes—Six Parts). 


Hart), The Web of Intrigue, Human Shut¬ 
tle, Fires of Hope, The Shadow of Fear, 
Hearts of Love (Six Parts—Drama), 26 
Arrow Comedies (One Part). 


Young America—(Series of 12 Two-Reel- 
ers). 


Lone Star Dramas—(Series of Two-Reel 
Westerns.) 


The Masked Rider—(Serial—Featuring 
Harry Meyers, Ruth Stonehouse and Paul 
Panzer.) 


Aywon Film Corp., 729 Seventh Ave., N. 
Y. City—The Eternal Penalty (Christine 
Mayo—Henry Kolker), Roses and Thorns 
(Lenore Ulrich), In the Days of Daring 
(Tom Mix), She Pays (Julia Dean), Justice 
(Cecil Scott), Guilty Woman (Marie Em¬ 
press). 


William A. Brady, Playhouse, Forty- 
Eighth St., N. Y. City—Stolen Orders. 


Bulls Eye Film Corp.—729 Seventh Ave., 
N. Y. City—(Two-Reel Comedies every two 
weeks, featuring Gale Henry), The Wild 
Woman, Stung. 


(Series of One-Reel Monkey Comedies) 
As Others See Us, Their First Flivver, 
Dreamy Chinatown, Film Fairies, Stopping 
Bullets, Caught with the Goods, Perils of 
the Beach, The Deserter, Behind the 
Scenes. 


Frank Gersten, Inc., 130 W. 46th St.— 
The Devil’s Playground, Nine Tenths of 
the Law, Tom Mix in Sixteen 2 Reelers, 
Who’s Afraid of the Hun?, The Million 
Dollar Mystery, The Crucible of Life, Wil¬ 
liam S. Hart in “Staking His Life”, The 
Accidental' Honeymoon, 26 Charlie Chaplin 
Mack-Sennett Keystone Comedies. The 
Struggle Everlasting, Persuasive Peg£y, 
City of Purple Dreams, Redemption, Paren¬ 
tage, I Believe, Today, Mad Lover, Zep¬ 
pelin’s Last Raid, Those Who Pay, The 
Belgian, Just a Woman, Civilization,' War’s 
Women, Joan the Woman, Beware of 
Strangers, Garden of Allah, Enlighten Thy 
Daughter, The Bar Sinister, The Whip, 
The Warrior, On Trial, Modern Lorelei. 


Exclusive Features, Inc., 124 W. 46th St. 
—16 Two-Reel Tom Mix Comedy-Dramas, 
12 One-Reel Tom Mix Comedies, 16 Two- 
Reel Kathlyn Williams Jungle and Comedy 
Dramas. 


YV. H. Productions, 71 West 23rd St., N. 
Y. City.—Mickey. (Seven Parts), Series of 
28 two-reel Mack Sennett Keystone come¬ 
dies, Series of 26 one and two-reel Charlie 
Chaplin comedies, Series of 24 single-reel 
Fatty Arbuckle comedies, Series of 28 
single-reel Liberty Keystones, Series of 28 
single-reel Eagle Keystones, Series of 15 
two reel Union-Kay-Bee Western dramas, 
Series of 15 two-reel Columbia-Kay-Bee 
Western Dramas, Everybody’s Business 
(Special). 


Billy West Comedies—Out of Tune (Two 
Parts). 


Burston Films, Inc., 1476 Broadway, New 
York—The Mystery of 13 (Francis Ford— 
Serial). 


Exclusive Features, Inc., 126 West 46th 
St., N. Y. City—The Heart of Texas Rvan, 
The Chosen Path (Margaret Leslie), Series 
of Tom Mix two-reel reissues. 


Tower Brand — Custer’s Last Fight The Film Market, Inc., 403 Times Build- 
(Three Parts), May 15—His Hour of Man- ing, N. Y. City—The Wonderland of Peru 
hood (W. S. Hart—Two Pafts), June 1— (Capt. Besley Expedition), The Undying 
Jim Cameron’s Wife (W. S. Hart—Two Story of Captain Scott (Capt. Scotr Antarc 
' tic Expedition), Animal Life in the Antarc- 


Parts.) 

Waldorf Photoplays, 229 YYest 42nd St., 
N. Y. City—Where Bonds Are Loosed. 


-i---—xxx tuc XJ.UU11C- 

tic (Capt. Scott Antarctic Expedition), The 
House Without Children. 

Frohman Amusement Co., Times Build¬ 
ing, N. Y. City—Once to Everyman. 


Elk Photoplays, Inc., 126 W. 46th St.— 
Souls Redeemed, Who’s Your Neighbor, 
Natural Law, Berlin via America, Cleopatra, 
The Libertine, Is Any Girl Safe?, The Lust 
of Ages, High Hand, Pieces of Silver, 
Reclaimed, The Snail, Denny from Ireland, 
The Ranger, Vim Comedies, Tom Mix, 
Comedy-Dramas, Miscellaneous Comedies. 


Pioneer Film Corp., 130 W. 46th St.— 
Wives of Men, The Still Alarm, The Prod¬ 
igal Wife, Little Orphant Annie, After the 
War, Virtuous Sinners, Hearts of Men, The 
Lady of the Dugout, The Boomerang, Un¬ 
pardonable Sin, Sins of the Children, The 
Long Arm of Mannister, The Hidden Code, 
Atonement, Parted Curtains, Confession. 


Harry Raver, 1402 Broadway, N. Y. City 
—The Master Crook, The Liberator (Serial 
Starring “Maciste”). 


Renco Film Co., 29 South La Salle St., 
Chicago—Birth of a Race. 


Romayne Superfilms, Marsh - Strong 
Building, Los Angeles—Me and Gott (Five 


YVarner Brothers, 220 West 42nd St., N. 
Y. City—The Kaiser’s Finish, Open Your 
Eyes, Beware. 


Lloyd YVillis, 1600 Broadway, N. Y. City 
—The Greater Sinner (James K. Ilackett). 


Hiram Abrams, 1476 Broadway, New 
York—Hearts of Men (George Beban—Six 
Parts—Drama). 


Alpha Pictures, Inc., 130 West 46th St., 
New York—Reclaimed. 


American Film Company, Inc., 6227 
Broadway, Chicago — Damaged Goods 
(Richard Bennett—Seven Parts). 


Arrow Film Corporation, Times Build¬ 
ing, New York—Ten J. Warren Kerrigan 
Reissues (Two Reels Each), Four Allison- 
Lockwood Reissues, 32 Unique Comedies 
(One Reel), Finger of Justice (Crane Wil¬ 
bur—Six Parts), The Profiteer (Alma Han¬ 
lon), The Commercial Pirates (Mile. Val- 
kyrien), Miss Arizona, Mysterious Mr. 
Browning, When the Desert Smiled (Neal 


YVestern Dramas—(26 Two-reelers Fea¬ 
turing Texas Guinan). South of Santa Fe, 
The She Wolf. 


Poppy Comedies—(26 One-Reel Come¬ 
dies Featuring Mack Swain—Weekly Re¬ 
lease). Ambrose’s Day Off, Daddy Am¬ 
brose. 

Film Specials, Inc., 130 West 46th St., 
N. Y. City. 


Selig Masterpieces—Brown of Harvard 
(Tom Moore). 


Harry Garson, Aeolian Building, N. Y. 
City—The Hushed Hour (Blanche Sweet), 
The Unpardonable Sin (Blanche Sweet). 


Gaumont Co., Flushing, L. I.—Gaumont 
News—Released every Tuesday, Gaumont 
Graphic—Released every Friday, Pictorial 
Life. 


Graphic Film Corp. 729 Seventh Ave., 
N. Y. City—Ashes of Love, The Echo of 
Youth, Some One Must Pay. 



WRITTEN . BY 

Tommy Gray 


Chas. H. France 

Director General 


Truart Pictures inc 

1^57 Broadway-New YorK Cit/. 


Truart 

Pictures 


Mintsu 

Durfeey 

MRS. ROSCOE' 
ARBUCKLE 


RESENTS 























































H. & H. Productions, Inc.—Love Wins 
(Violet Mersereau). 


J. Frank Hatch, 912 Longacre Building, 
N. Y. City—Tempest and Sunshine. 


Hiller and Wilk, Inc.—The Silent Mys¬ 
tery (Francis Ford Serial), 28 Triangle re¬ 
issues starring William S. Hart, Norma 
Talmadge, Douglas Fairbanks and Frank 
Keenan, The Wrath of the Gods, The Bat¬ 
tle of Gettysburg, Raffles, the Amateur 
Cracksman. 


vr •Productions, Inc., 729 Seventh Ave., 
N. Y City—(40 Single-Reel Tom Mix Wes¬ 
terns), Stingaree (Serial—15 Episodes), 
Series of Ham and Bud Re-issnes (One 
Part). 


Juvenile Photoplay Distribution Co., 729 
Seventh Ave., N. Y. City—Boys’ Life Screen 
Review. 


Wictor Kremer, 105 W. 40th St., N. Y. 
City—(Shortly Hamilton Series—Five-Part 
Comedies), The Ranger, Denny from Ire¬ 
land, The Pen Vulture, The Snail, Ten 
George Ade Fables (Essanay Reissue), Ten 
Broncho Billy Dramas (Essanay Reissue), 
Ten Snakeville Comedies (Essanav Reis¬ 
sue). 


Oliver Films, Inc., 308 East 48th St., N. 

p™- Cl !i y ~ T c e <. Carter Case. A Serial in 15 
Episodes of two reels each, featuring Her¬ 
bert Rawlinson and Margaret Marsh. 


Pioneer Fiim Corp.— 130 West 46th St., 

viT-tiTA,, Cl a- y ~ The Boomerang (Walthall), 
Virtuous Sinners (Wanda Hawley), Sins of 

m 0 p ! ldr ™ (Alma Hanlon and Stuart 
The Long Arm of Mannister 
(Henry Walthall), The Lady of the Dug- 
fA ,VJenmngs), The Girl from Nowhere 
(Cleo Madison). 


„^ rl o? la , R ? le a ses . . 1919— One Reel—Kila- 
uea. Skyland, Catalina Everywhere, Model 
Girls, Trout, Kiddies, China, Birds and 
Flowers, Alaskan Revelations, Hawaii Gla¬ 
cier Park Old Faithful, ’Gators, Grand 
Canyon, Oahu, Japan, Petrified Forest 
Niagara, The Hell of the Yukon, Heart of 
o e “hy Mountains, Gowns Venus Would 
Hmvy, The Last of the Seminoles, The Eden 
°- T Paciflc - The Roof of America, Ma¬ 
rimba Land, Medicine Lodge, A Day with 
John Burroughs, The Apache Trail, The 
Cost of Carelessness, Guatemala, The Lure 
of Alaska. 


a b° v e are photo- 
graphed in Nature’s colors, and released 
with the color in the film so that they can 
be projected on any standard projecting 
machine at normal speed without special 
lighting or projecting attachments of any 
kind. J 


of Daring, Featuring Tom Mix Re¬ 
issues, five reels; Tom Mix One-Reel Com¬ 
edy Drama Re-issues, one reel each, re¬ 
leased weekly, forty in all; Fatty Arbuckle 
One-Reel Comedy Re-issues, one reel each, 
released weekly, twenty-four in all; Shorty 
Hamilton Western Comedy Drama Re¬ 
issues, two reels each, fifteen in all, re¬ 
leased every other week; Warren Kerrigan 
Two-Reel Western Re-issues, two reels 
each, seven in all, released every other 
week; William S. Hart Western Re-issues, 
two reels each, seventeen in all, released 
weekly; Keystone Komedy Re-issues, two 
reels each, ninteen in all, released weekly; 
Redemption, Featuring Evelyn Nesbit and 
her son Russell Thaw, six reels; The Two 
Gun Man, In the Bargain, Wm. S. Hart 
Re-issues; The Bandit and the Preacher, 
Wm. S. Hart Re-issue, five reels; The Hell 
Hound of Alaska, Wm. S. Hart Re-issue, 
five reels; Capital Film Company, Releases, 
Twenty-four new two-reel Western Re¬ 
leases, featuring Neal Hart. Begin releas¬ 
ing July 1, 1919 every other week. Twenty- 
four new two-reel Western releases, featur¬ 
ing A1 Jennings. Begin releasing July 
8, every other week. Burly-Q Comedies, 
one reel each, released weekly, beginning 
June 23, 1919. Two-reel re-issues featuring 
Billy Anderson, True Boardman, Bryant 
Washburn, Ben Turpin, Helen Gibson, and 
many others. Other offices handling many 
of these releases in Dallas and San Antonio, 
Tex. and Little Rock, Ark. 

OMAHA, NEBR.— 

A. H. Blank Enterprises, 314 S. 13th St.— 
Distributers for First National Exhibitors 
Circuit: Raffles, Today, Mad Lover, The 
Sign Invisible, Passing of the Third Floor 
Back, The Cold Deck, On Trial, Submarine 
Eye, Empty Pockets, Alimony, Fall of the 
Romanoffs, The Frozen Warning, The Sins 
of Ambition, Human Clay, One Law for 
Both, The Liar. Short Reels: Christy 
Comedies, one each week, one reel each. 
Vodavil Movies, nine releases, everyone a 
feature. Italy’s Flaming Front, a series of 
six releases, one-reel each. 

Sterling Film Corp., 1417 Farnum St.— 
One and Two-Reel Fatty Arbuckle, Two- 
Reel Billy West, Outing-Chester. One and 
Two-Reel Charley Chaplin, One and Two- 
Reel Tom Mix, Five-Reel Lockwood-Allison 
Productions, Accidental Honeymoon, The 
Struggle Everlasting, When the Desert 
Smiled, The Days of Daring, I Believe. 


OKLAHOMA, OKLA.— 

R. D. Lewis Film Co., Inc., 114 S. Hudson 
St.—The Masked Rider, Serial; Bullseye 
Comedies, Featuring Billy West, Gale 
Henry, Mack Swain and others, two reels 
each, weekly release; Christie Comedies, 
Regular weekly release, one reel each; 
Spanuth’s Original Vod-a-Vil Movies, week¬ 
ly, novelty release, one reel each; Gau- 
mont News; Gaumont Graphic; Gaumont 
Pictorial Life, Novelty, weekly release, one 
reel each; Selig Monkey Comedies, weekly 
release, one reel each; Shorty Hamilton 
Western Comedy Drama Features, five 
reels each: The Snail, The Ranger, The 
Pen Vulture, Hearts A ’Flame, Denny 
from Ireland; Satan on Earth, Gaumont 
novelty feature, two reels; The Real 
Roosevelt, Gaumont’s Special Feature, two 
reels; .Hand of Vengeance, Gaumont;’s 
Serial, ten two-reel episodes; In the Days 


Fontenelle Feature Film Co., 1504 Harney 
St.—Woman, The Masque of Life, The Sun¬ 
set Princess. The Witching Hour, Satan 
on Earth, The King Bee and Bulls Eye 
Billy West Comedies, The Gale Henry 
Comedies, Series of Ten Single-Reel Special 
Monkey Comedies, The Gaumont New? and 
Graphic Weeklies, Twelve Anna Little— 
.Tack Richardson Two-Reel Westerns, Gau¬ 
mont Serial, The Hand of Vengeance, Six¬ 
teen William S. Hart Two-Reel Westerns, 
Line of Single-Reel Miscellaneous Comedies 
Including Mutt and Jeff, Hans Und Fritz, 
Christy and Others. 

Omaha Film Exchange, 108 South 14th 
St.—Lion of the Hills, Berlin via America. 


PHILADELPHIA, PA.— 

Peerless Feature Film Exchange, 1339 

Vine St.—Conquest of Canaan, Witching 
Hour, Woman Who Dared, Even As You 
and I, People vs John Doe, On Trial, Her 
Condoned Sin, Redemption, 20,000 Leauges 
Under the Sea, God’s Man, Parentage, 
Babbling Tongues, Slacker’s Heart, Sub¬ 
marine Eye, Frozen Warning, Persuasive 
Peggy, Alimony, Daughter of Destiny, 
Light Within, Sign Invisible, Tarzan of 
the Apes, Fall of the Romanoffs, Life Mask, 
My Four Years in Germany, Passing of the 
Third Floor Back, Empty Pockets, Tem¬ 
pered Steel, Italy’s Flaming Front, Rom¬ 
ance of Tarzan, Panther Woman, Kaiser’s 
Finish, Virtuous Wives, Fighting Roose¬ 
velts, Midnight Romance, Daddy Long 
Legs, Auction of Souls, Mary Regan, Dog’s 
Life, Shoulder Arms, Sunnyside, Choosing 
a Wife, Unpardonable Sin, Human Desires, 
Bill Apperson’s Boy, The Temperamental 
Wife, The Hoodlum, Kingdom of Dreams, 
Lehrman Comedies, In Old Kentucky; 
Pollyanna. 

Supreme Foto-Play Prod., 256 N. 13th 
St.— The Still Alarm, Mickey, The Prodigal 
Wife. 

The Hatch Film Co., 256 N. 13th St.— 
Wives of Men, Woman, Tempest and Sun¬ 
shine. 

Electric Theatre Supply Co., Inc., 13th 
and Vine Sts.—Chester Outing, Bruce 
Scenic, Cartoons, Gaumont Weeklies, Pho¬ 
toplay Magazine, Two-Reel Christie Com¬ 
edy, Single-Reel Christie Comedy, Tom 
Mix Western Single-Reel. 

Monarch Film Service, 1220 Vine St.- 
Invisible Power, Lust of the Ages, The 
Warrior, Somewhere in Georgia, Beulah, 
Blood of His Fathers, Peg of the Sea, 
Salomy Jane, Daughter of War, Behind 
the Mask, House of Temperley, Miss 
Deception Little Lord Fauntelroy, Ragged 
Earl, House of Shadows, The Three of Us, 
Around the World in 90 Days, Maciste, 
Brothers Tyranny, Broken Heart, An 
American King, The Lure, Criminal Code, 
Sunshine and Shadows. 

PITTSBURGH, PA.— 

Supreme Photoplay Productions, 1201 
Liberty St.—Mickey, Carmen of the Klon¬ 
dike, Accidental Honeymoon, Struggle 
Everlasting, The Prodigal Wife, Loyalty, 
Finger of Justice, Humility, Tillie’s Punc¬ 
tured Romance. 

Penn Film Service, 1023 Forbes St.— 
Civilization, 20,000 Leauges Under the Sea, 
Garden of Allah, Italian Battle Front, 
Silent Mystery Serial, His Hour of Man¬ 
hood, Jim Cameron’s Wife, Custer’s Last 
Fight, Eternal Penalty, She Pays, In the 
Days of Daring, Commercial Program of 
Mutual, Jaxon Film Corporation, Capital 
Film Co. Program, Francis Ford, Wm. S. 
Hart Re-issues, W. H. Production, Aywon 
Film Corporations, One and Two-Reel Sub¬ 
jects, One-Reel Re-issues of releases in 
this city. 



WfRP-'M. 


Charles Hutchison 

(HURRICANE HUTCH) 

Whose Super-Sensational Work Featured 

THE GREAT GAMBLE 

Produded by WESTERN PHOTOPLAYS, Inc. 
DISTRIBUTED BY 

PATHE 


55 


PERSONAL MANAGEMENT 

A. ALPERSTEIN 


DIRECTED BY 

JOSEPH A. GOLDEN 

























Craft Film Service, Seltzer Bldg., 1201 
Liberty Ave.—The Grain of Dust, The 
Two Gun-Man in the Bargain, The Hell 
Hound of Alaska, The Bandit and the 
Preacher, Staking His Life, Miss Arizona, 
The Woman’s Law, Tom Mix Series of 
Forty Single-Reel Western Comedy- 
Dramas. 

PORTLAND, OREGON— 

Empire Film Service, 393 Oak St.—We 
handle a number of films mostly of an 
Educational and scenic nature, catering 
especially to this class of service. 

ST. LOUIS, MO— 

Standard Film Corp., New Plaza Bldg., 
3317 Olive St.—Two-Reel Mix Westerns; 
Two-Reel Hart Westerns; Two-Reel Ham¬ 
ilton Westerns; Single-Reel Christie Com¬ 
edies, one per week; Chas. Leonard Fletch¬ 
er’s Screen Monologue, 500 feet, one per 
week; “Eagle’s Eye” Serial, 20 episodes, 
featuring King Baggott and Marguerite 
Snow; “Silent Mystery” Serial, 15 episodes, 
featuring Francis Ford, Rosemary Theby 
and Mae Gaston; “Hand of Vengeance” 
Gaumont’s ten-episode serial; 52 Ham and 
Bud Comedies, new prints, new titles, one 
per week; 11 Single-Reel Arbuckle Com¬ 
edies, new prints, new titles; 29 Two-Reel 
W. H. Keystone Comedies; Gaumont 
Weekly; Gaumont Pictorial Life; Gau¬ 
mont’s Graphic; Gaumont’s Two-Reel 
“Satan on Earth”; Victorial Cross’ famous 
“Five Nights,” featuring Lady Balfour; 
Robert Warwick and Elaine Hammerstein 
in “The Mad Lover”; Florence Reed and 
Frank Mills in “Today”; Florence Reed 
in “A Women’s Law”; Charlotte Walker in 
“Just a Woman”; Wm. S. Hart in “The 
Two-Gun Man”; Wm. S. Hart in “Bandit 
and the Preacher”; Wm. S. Hart in "Hell 
Hound of Alaska”; Charlotte Walker, Anna 
Lehr and Robert Cain in “Men”; “Topics 
of the Day,” first 26 releases; Those Who 
Pay,” featuring Bessie Barriscale; Four¬ 
square Productions; U. S. Exhibitors’ Pro¬ 
ductions. 

Standard Film Corp., St. Louis—One- 
reel Ham and Bud comedies, one-reel 
Christie comedies, one-reel Fatty Arbuckle 
comedies, one-reel Cartoon, one-reel See- 
nics, one-reel Ditmar’s Living Book of 
Nature, Gaumont Weekly, Photoplay 
Screen Supplement, Fletcher’s Screen Mon¬ 
ologue, two-reel Tom Mix dramas, two- 
reel Wm. S. Hart dramas,The Silent Mys¬ 
tery serial—15 episodes, feature Francis 
Ford, Rosemary Theby and Mae Gaston; 
The Masked Rider—15 episodes, feature 
Ruth Stonehouse, Paul Panzer and Harry 
Myers. Features: It May Be Your 

Daughter, The Girl Who Doesn’t Know, 
Satan, The Destroyer of Humanity, Five 
Nights, Today, The Mad Lover, A Woman’s 
Law. 

United Film Service, 3628 Olive St.— 
Hearts of the World, Birth of a Nation, 
Intolerance, Mickey, The Fall of Babylon, 
Mother and the Law, The Witching Hour, 
Mothers of Liberty, Jester Comedies, Two- 
Reel Wm. S. Hart Re-issues, Twenty-four 


Chaplin Re-issues, Twenty-four Arbuckle 
Re-issues, Twenty-eight Keystone Liberty 
Brand. Twenty-eight Keystone Eagle 
Brand. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS— 

Independent Film Exchange, 204 Frost 
Bldg.—The California Outlaws, Jaxon 
Serial A Daughter of Uncle Sam, The Crim¬ 
son Stain Mystery, past releases including 
Keystone Comedies, and Features. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— 

Independent Film Exchange, 120 Golden 
Gate Ave.—The California Outlaws, Jaxon 
Serial, A Daughter of Uncle Sam, Jaxon 
and Sparkle Single-Reel Comedies. 

M. & R. Feature Film Exchane, 107 Gold¬ 
en Gate Ave.—Ashes of Love, Are You 
Legally Married, Babbling Tongues, Ber¬ 
lin via America, City of Illusions, The 
Deemster, Echo of Youth, Forbidden 
Fruit, A Fool’s Paradise, The Girl Who 
Did Not Care, Her Bargain, The Immortal 
Flame, Life or Honor, The Liar, The Lady 
of the Dugout, Married in Name Only, 
Man’s Law, Mother, One Law for Both, 
Mother I Need You, The Prodigal Wife, 
Redemption, Traitors Within the Gates, 
When Men Betray, The Window Opposite, 
Wm. L. Sherry Service, Medbury Mutter- 
ings. _ 

All Star Features Distributors, Inc., 191 

Golden Gate Ave.—Mickey, Yanke e Doodle 
in Berlin, The Spreading Evil, Unpardon¬ 
able Sin, Hearts of Men, Parentage, Tom 
Mix Re-issues, The Struggle Everlasting, 
The Accidental Honeymoon, Nine-Tenths 
of the Law, The Grain of Dust, The Still 
Alarm, The Spoilers, Five Nights, The 
Natural Law. 

SEATTLE, WASH.— 

Rialto Feature Film Co., Inc., 218 Seneca 
St.—A Lion of the Hills, Wrath of the 
Gods, Checkers, Span of Life, High Hand, 
The Lottery Man, Web of Intrigue, The 
Fire of Hope, Human Shuttles, Shadow of 
Fear, Miss Arizona. 

Greater Features Company, 2020 Third 
Ave.—Wives of Men, Eyes of the World, 
Who’s Your Neighbor, A Mormon Maid, 
The Dumb Girl of Portici, Witching Hour, 
Conquest of Canaan, Christie Specials, 
Christie One-Reel Comedies, Bruce Scenics, 
International Cartoons, Photoplay Maga¬ 
zine Screen Supplement, Billy West and 
Gale Henry Comedies, Jester Comedies, 
Gaumont News and Graphic, Gaumont Pic¬ 
torial Life, Current Daily Topics, Fletchers 
Screen Monologue. 

De Luxe Feature Film Co., 2014 Third 
Ave.—Hearts of the World, Mickey, Yankee 
Doodle in Berlin, Spreading Evil, The 
Spoilers, Kaiser’s Finish, Grain of Dust, 
Nine-Tenths of the Law, Carmen of the 
Klondike, The Whip, Garden of Allah. 

Leon Dories, 2016 Third Ave.—Zeppelin’s 
Last Raid, The Belgian, Those Who Pay, 
Bar Sinister, Her Fighting Chance, Natural 
Law, Just a Woman, Sin Woman, The Cast 
Off, One Hour, Great White Trail, The 
Silent Witness. 


W. S. Brewster Attractions, 2020 Third 
Ave.—Birth of a Nation, Ramona, The 
Crisis, Masque of Life, The Wayrior. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y.— 

Dooley Exchange, Inc., 445 S. Warren St. 
—Billy West two-reel comedies one every 
two weeks. Gale Henry Comedies one 
every two weeks. Also Tom Mix one-reel 
"Re-issues” one a week for the next forty 
weeks. Shorty Hamilton features. 

McCarthy Film Service, 551 S. Salina St. 
—Perfect Model, Damaged Goods, Shadow 
of Fear, Mutual Re-issues, Chaplin," 
Arbuckle, W. S. Hart, Short Subjects. 

TORONTO, CAN.— 

Monarch Film Co., Ltd.—Distributors in 
Canada of Goldwyn and Select. Single and 
Double-Reel Christie Comedies. British 
Specials: The Better ’Ole, Kiddies in the 
Ruins, Gamble for Love, Turf Conspiracy, 
Our Boys in Germany, The Life of Lord 
Nelson, The Boxing Tournament, Fortune 
at Stake, The Woman Wins, Comradeship, 
The Last Lesson. American Specials: 
Birth of a Nation, Hearts of the World, 
Unpardonable Sin, Intolerance, Cavell Case. 
Famous Players Film Service, Ltd., affil¬ 
iated, are handling Paramount Artcraft 
Productions, using the 1917, 1918 and 1919 
programs. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND.— 

Lyric Film and Supply Co., Fifth St. and 
Big Four Railroad—Florence Reed—Wives 
of Men, Maurice Tourneur’s—Woman, Car¬ 
mel Myers—Temptation, Anna Pavlowa— 
Dumb Girl of Portici, Louise Huff and 
Julia Dean—She Pays, Lenore Ulrich— 
Roses and Thorns, Christine Mayo and 
Henry Kolker — Eternal Penalty, Cyril 
Scott—Justice, Marie Empress—The Guilty 
Woman, Tom Mix—Days of Daring. Pyra¬ 
mid Comedies featuring Ray Hughes in 
two-reel subjects: Beauties and Bombs, 
Camouflage Ball, In and Out, Call of 
Spring, Beach Birds, Love and Lunch. 

WASHINGTON, D. C.— 

Capital Film Service, 916 G St. Northwest 
—Billy West, Gale Henry Jester, Ham and 
Bud, Napoleon and Sally. 

Super-Film Attractions, Inc.—Sidney B. 
Lust, Inc., 916 G Street N. W.—Short Sub¬ 
jects: Gaumont News and Graphics, Chris¬ 
tie Comedies, Ambrose Comedies, Topical 
Tips, Two Reel Westerns, Mystery Leap¬ 
ing Fish, Wilcox Series, Mutt and Jeff, 
Pictorial Life, Billy Wests, Real Roose¬ 
velt Satan on Earth, Surrender German 
Fleet, Texas Guinan Westerns. Serials: 
Hand of Vengeance, Silent Mystery, Carter 
Case. Features: Mickey, Once to Every 
Man, Whip, Still Alarm, Web of Intrigue, 
Raffles, Just a Woman, Crucible of Life, 
Nine-Tenths of the Law, Cold Deck, Lion 
of the Hills, Are Passions Inherited, Loy¬ 
alty, On Trial, Kaiser’s Finish, Kerensky, 
Tillie’s Punctured Romance, Purity, Yan¬ 
kee Doodle in Berlin with the Mack Sen- 
nett Bathing Girls. Success Series (re¬ 
issues) : 16 W. S. Hart, 13 Douglas Fair¬ 

banks, 7 Norma Talmadge, 9 Frank Kee¬ 
nan. 





Some Hobbies 



































































































































































































Prominent Film Men 



/^jVXWELL KAR6ER 



GABRIEL JL. HESS 










































































































} 



1'U 




More Hobbies 




HOBEKl X.IE.3HR. 


c ■^keaha.n . /p/o 
















































































































































More Hobbies 



AHOLPH ZU K OR 


wV « \ .. 
•nii. 


S- J‘ HOLLO 




mack sen nett 



AHTHUR- S. FRIEND 



R1CHA.RH A ‘R.OWL.ATSTD 



ITS THE- 
ONLV PLACE 
To Uivt^ 

BOVS 


*3kd :SM\\I 


HIRAM ABRAMS' 


„ v't'l 



WINFIELD SHEEHAN 


JOSEPH AXT ENGEL 

c 5 ^e<a^a^z 













































































































Film Specials, Inc. 


Presents 
the first of the 


Edward Jose Productions 


“MOTHERS of MEN 




Directed h\) 

EDWARD JOSE 


if 










KATHERINE MacDONALD 

Quality Productions 

for 

Fi r s t N a tional 


Katherine MacDonald Studio 

GEORGIA and GIRARD STREETS 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


SAM E. RORK 
Manager 






































































































SELLING ON MERIT 

I have sincerely appreciated 
the recent change in market 
conditions which gives the 
creative producer a fair op¬ 
portunity to profit in propor¬ 
tion to the merit of the films 
he makes. 

“Hearts of Men” my first 
independent personally pro¬ 
duced venture brought such 
remarkable returns as to de -' 
finitely decide my future. 

I know now that I can af¬ 
ford to venture large sums and - 
put my best into special inde¬ 
pendent features and I pro¬ 
mise you productions of the 
sort my thousands of good 
friends among the theater 
owners will welcome. 



Beban Studios 

Hollywood 












Fred Shaeffer 

Art Director 

KATHERINE MacDONALD 

Productions 


MANY YEARS WITH BELASCO 

Look Over My Sets In Miss MacDonald’s Productions 



Vernon L. Walker 


Cinematographer 

VERNON DENT 

BURSTON FILM GORP. 

NATIONAL FILM CORP. 

Playing Heavies 

EDWIN BOWER HESSER 

SELIG 

WITH 

HANK MANN 

ALASKA TOURS 

R. R. B. P. PHOTO DIV. 


SIGNAL CORPS 


NOW WITH 


Hank Mann Comedies 


Los Angeles, Cal. 













Exhibitors—Write for Address^ofjYour Nearest Distributor 



RELIEVE 


THAT 


DREARY 

PROGRAM 


How? 


SLAPSTICK, of course! 


No pink-tea stuff—but genuine, fast- 
moving slap-stick, beautifully photo¬ 
graphed. 


HANK MANN 




HANK MANN is the 
Master of SLAPSTICK 

State Right Dealers : 

GRAB THESE SINGLE-REELERS 
Distributed through 
Arrow Film Corporation 

220 West 42nd Street New York City 

Morris R. Schlank 

Producer of Hank Mann Comedies 
1570 Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles, Cal. 



MADGE KIRBY 















It 



tj I have learned much from 
the thousands of letters I 
have received from Fans 
and Exhibitors who have 
written me after seeing 


t]| I wrote the 
story — and per¬ 
sonally supervised 
the taking of every 
scene.* THE AD¬ 
VENTURES of 
RUTH” is my 

own — in' pep, in 
class, in action — 
in romance! 

I know you will 
like it! 


“WHO PAYS?” 

“THE RED CIRCLE” 
“THE NEGLECTED WIFE” 
“THE PRICE OF FOLLY” 
“HANDS UP!” 

“THE TIGER’S TRAIL” 

and others. 


qin order that my present serial, 


“THE 

ADVENTURES 
OF RUTH ” 


should measure up to the 
dearest wishes of theFans 


and the real needs and 


ideals of the Exhibitors, 


as they have been ex¬ 
pressed to me, I have 
done it myself. 






LOUIS B. MAYER 

Presents 

ANITA STEWART 

IN A SERIES OF “INDEFINITE RUN ” PRODUCTIONS 


Watch The Trade Papers for Future 
Announcements 

MILDRED HARRIS 

CHAPLIN 

Appearing in a series of special Photo Plays 
presented under the Mayer Policy of high class 
directors, well known hooks, big plays and 
stories written by Prominent Authors. 

Exhibitors; the name “MAYER” on special 
productions means Increased Receipts at your 
Box Office. 


LOUIS B. MAYER 


2 WEST 45th STREET 


NEW YORK CITY 





































ANITA STEWART 

ANITA STEWART PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 

Direction 

MARSHALL NEILAN 

Release 

FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS CIRCUIT 









JOSEPH E. HENABERRY, ‘DIRECTOR*** 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS PICTURES CORP. 

j\_ rtcrnft 

“The Man From Painted Post” 

“Say, Young Fellow” 

United Artists Corp. 

“His Majesty, the American” 

NOW WITH 

MAYER PRODUCTIONS 





















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I DIRECTOR 


M. P. D. A. 



Constance 

Talmadge 

In: 

“GOOD NIGHT PAUL” 

“A PAIR OF SILK STOGKINGS” 
“SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE” 
“MRS. LEFFINGWELL’S BOOTS” 
“A LADY’S NAME” 

“WHO CARES” 

“ROMANCE AND ARABELLA” 
“THE VEILED ADVENTURE” 
“HAPPINESS A LA MODE” 


Marguerite Clark 


In: 

“GIRLS” 

“WIDOW BY PROXY” 

“LUCK IN PAWN” 

“A GIRL NAMED MARY” 
“ALL OF A SUDDEN PEGGY” 


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V*****<f*********^******************** ************************** 


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Robert G. Vignola 


Productions: 

The Third Kiss 

Seventeen 

The Spider 

The Fortunes of Fifi 

Louisiana 

Audrey 

The Claw 

A Woman’s Weapons 
The Home Town Girl 
The Heart of Youth 


DIRECTOR, 

Under Cover 
The Moment Before 
The Knife 
The Reason Why 
Vickey Van 

An Experimental Marriage 
The Love that Lives 
Great Expectations 
The Girl Who Came Back 
His Official Fiancee 


Stars: 

Pauline Frederick 
Jack Pickford 
Owen Moore 
Hazel Dawn 
Marguerite Clark 
Alice Brady 
Clara Kimball Young 
Ethel Clayton 
Vivian Martin 
Constance Talmadge 


Under Production: 

More Deadly than the Male Lila Lee 


With Famous Player-Lasky 





















JAMES G. VAN TREES 
Photographer 


DEL ANDREWS 
Film Cutter 


Famous Players—Lasky Co. 

MOROSCO STUDIO 

* 4 

Constance Talmadge 

“GOOD NIGHT PAUL” 

“SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE” 

“A PAIR OF SILK STOCKINGS” 
“MRS. LEFFINGWELL’S BOOTS” 

“A LADY’S NAME” 

“ROMANCE AND ARABELLA” 

“THE VEILED ADVENTURE” 
“HAPPINESS A LA MODE” 

“WHO CARES” 

Marguerite Clark 

“GIRLS” 

“A WIDOW BY PROXY” 




















Compliments to 


WID’S 




Ctfttl 

Clapton 


Paramount Pictures 



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offering the biggest and best production 

of her screen career 

"EyES or yOUTH" 

To Bo Released, in October TTirongh 

Equity Pictures Corporation 


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The Garson Studios occupy a four-acre tract at 1845 Allesandro Street, in the Edendale District of Los 
Angeles: ten minutes by car line from the heart of the business section. The walls, buildings and grounds are 
the early California or mission period the main gate being an exact replica of the belfry walls of the San Gabriel 
Mission, built near .Los Angeles by the Franciscan fathers during the period of the American War for Inde¬ 
pendence. Clara Kimball Young productions and others are made at the Gar son Studios, which are among the 
most thoroughly equipped and compact of all California studios. 



If 


uS 


IXirrl - 

























































---—-- 

Albert 

Director 

« 

ESPECIALLY ENGAGED BY HARRY GARSON 

TO DIRECT 

CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG in "Eyes of Youth” 

To be Released in October 


FORMER PRODUCTIONS—The big propaganda success of the Fourth 
Liberty Loan, “Sic-Em-Sam”* also “Arizona” and “Knickerbocker 
Buckaroo” for Douglas Fairbanks—and many other big hits. 


* 

* 

Alfred 

E. Green 


Next Release: 

Current Release: 

HOUSE PETERS in 

"Right After Brown” 

"Love, Honor and Obey” 

with Peggy Hyland 

F ~~ ■ - - - ■ - 

A Katterjohn Production 





















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Pauline Starke 

In Maurice Tourneur Productions 

“THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY” 
“ROMANY RYE” 


Now Playing with Clara Kimball Young in 

“THE EYES OF YOUTH” 


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l 


Chas. K. French 


Who has played in support of 

LEADING STAKS 


Now with 


NAZIMOVA 



v 



























WILLIAM 


^easoTi 192 7 - 15 ^easoi^ 1Q1&-1Q 

The Narrow Trail TheBorcfciWireless 

. «. 

Tlie Silent Man Branding Broadway 
Wolves of theR^il Breed of Men 
Blue Blades P^wden TheftpiyGirlsHiJsbQid 
The Ti£er Ma n The Money Corral 
"Selfish'Yates Sqi^are Dea^nttdersori 
*S hariC Monroe W 7 a^o nTr acfs 
RiddleG awne JohixJPettieoats 


LAMBERT HILLYER, 

« > d i c TOJ^ 

LE ROY STONE 

<—’PRQDUCTION EDI TOR, 









Willis and Inglis 



Motion Picture and. 
Theatrical Enterprises 





Wright Callender Building 


Los Angeles, California 







WILLIAM DUNCAN 









MONTGOMERY & ROCK 

VITAGRAPH 


EARL MOIN iGOMERY 

— — LEADING THE ALL 

LOUISE GRANVILLE MAX ASHER 


JOE ROCK 

S TAR CAST ■■■=■■■ ..— 

BILLY FAY LESTER LeMAY 


BOB EVANS JOE BONNER 
Ass’t Director 
IRVING LUDDY 
Props—GEO. MARION 


SAM KAUFMAN 
DIRECTOR 

Gilbert Pratt 


MURRAY SIMBERG 

Cinematographer 
REGGIE LYONS 
Asst.—GEO. HIBBARD 


RALPH LEWIS 



“The Valley of the Giants ’ 
“The Hoodlu m” 
“Lyes of Youth” 


VLRA LEWIS 



“Lord and Lady Algy” 
“Merry Go Round’’ 
“Lombardi Ltd.’’ 



































DAVID WARK GRIFFITH 


“He paints the lily. He refines pure gold. He adds another hue to the 
rainbow. He works in an understanding way for those who understood.”— 
Charles E. Hastings in the Exhibitors Trade Review, May 24,1919. 


For information concerning Griffith Productions address 
Albert L. Grey, 720 Longacre Building , New York City 





the d icriTU STANDS 

NAME V_J.I\1.F r I 1 n FORWARD 

As a Guarantee of these Special Productions 
Direct from the Griffith Repertory Season in New York 

The Mother and the Law 

A DRAMATIC THUNDERBOLT—WITH MAE MARSH, 

ROBERT HARRON, MIRIAM COOPER, WALTER LONG, 

VERA LEWIS, FRED TURNER, MARGARET MARSH, 

SAM DE GRASSE, TOM WILSON, LLOYD INGRAHAM, 

J. C. McCLURE, BARNEY BERNARD, TOD BROWNING, 

RALPH LEWIS, EDWARD DILLON, ALBERTA LEE. 

The Fall of Babylon 

THE GREATEST SPECTACLE OF ALL TIME—WITH 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE, GEORGE FAWCETT, MIL¬ 
DRED HARRIS CHAPLIN, TULLY MARSHALL, ELMER 
CLIFTON, SEENA OWEN, ALMA RUBENS, PAULINE 
STARK, ALFRED PAGET, ELMO LINCOLN, KATE 
BRUCE, GEORGE SIEGMANN. And including 125,000 men 
and women, 7,500 horses, 4,000 dancing girls. 

H earts of the World 

THE NEW REVISED EDITION, EMBRACING THE 
LEAGUE OF NATIONS, THE PEACE CONFERENCE AT 
VERSAILLES, AND WITH A CAST INCLUDING LIL¬ 
LIAN AND DOROTHY GISH, ROBERT HARRON, LITTLE 
BEN ALEXANDER, GEORGE FAWCETT, ROBERT AN¬ 
DERSON, JOSEPHINE CROWELL, ADOLPHE LESTINA, 

GEORGE SIEGMANN, KATE BRUCE, and including the 
personal appearance also of LLYOD GEORGE, WINSTON 
CHURCHILL, PREMIER VIVIANI, DAVID ASQUITH, 
and all the leading figures in the world war. 


RELEASED 

THROUGH 


D. W. GRIFFITH SERVICE 

ALBERT L. GREY, General Manager 


IMMEDIATE 

BOOKINGS 


720 Longacre Building New York City 













David Wark Griffith 

“The most sane and imaginative American who ever 
revolutionized the theatre when it needed an emancipator.” 

—Amy Leslie in The Chicago Daily News. 

“It needs only the showing of a Griffith picture to stop 
all cavil about his pre-eminence in the cinema field.”— 

Monroe Lathrop, in the Los Angeles Express. 

“A new art has indeed .arrived; an art as important as 
that of Poetry or Music. You have immortalized yourself. 

I feel that a new era has dawned.”—Charles Hanson Towne 
editor of McClure’s Magazine. 

“He has far exceeded the power of the written word. 

It would be impossible for the greatest master of language 
to picture the emotions as Griffith has perpetuated them.” 

—Louis Gardy in the New York Call. 

“Mr. Griffith should think of a new name for his work, 
along with a new synonym for the words ‘photo-play/ be¬ 
cause his productions are so different from those of other 
directors that they require a separate classification.”—New 
Yord Herald, May 14, 1919. 

“ WITH ALL RESPECT TO HIS RIVALS, MR. GRIFFITH HAS DEMON¬ 
STRATED HIS RIGHT TO THE DISTINCTION OF BEING THE SOLE AND 
ONLY PRODUCER TO MAKE A PICTURE THAT WILL GO ON THE ‘BIG 
TIME ' AND STAY THERE AT TWO DOLLAR PRICES.”—Herald, Washing¬ 
ton, D. C. 

“HE IS THE GREATEST AMERICAN SHOWMAN SINCE BARNUM, THE 
BEST AMERICAN ARTIST SINCE MARK TWAIN.”— Chicago Herald-Examiner , 
August 19, 1919. 

“EACH NEW PRODUCTION DEMONSTRATES THAT HE IS AN ARTIST 
OF FULL AND SPLENDID NATURALISTIC POWERS. HE IS THE GREAT 
LEGENDARY FIGURE OF THE FILMS , THE GREAT, CONSISTENT, PRO- 
GRESSING GENIUS OF TOD A YP—The New Republic. 

















$ 3= a seat 


Not for one seat, not for one night, but throughout the entire 
Griffith Repertory Season of two hundred and four performances at 
the Geo. M. Cohan Theatre, New York City, the public gladly paid 
three dollars for choice seats to see the following D. W. Griffith super¬ 
productions: “Broken Blossoms,” “The Fall of Babylon/’ “Hearts of 
the World,” “The Mother and the Law.” 

“For the first time in the history of pictures, seats are being sold 
for $3 at the Geo. M. Cohan Theatre. This puts Griffith in a new record¬ 
setting class.”—N. Y. Clipper, May 28, 1919. 

“Announcements appear in the newspapers today that a number of 
seats in the Geo. M. Cohan Theatre will be sold at $3. This is the first 
time in the history of picture presentation that any seat has sold for as 
much as $3 at the box office.”—Wid’s Daily, New York, May 22, 1919. 

“Moving pictures climbed to 
Broadway’s highest price scale 
Monday, when the rate went to 
$3 for orchestra seats at Geo. 

M. Cohan’s Theatre, for the 
D. W. Griffith repertory sea¬ 
son.”— Variety, New York, 

May 30, 1919. 

“The $3 seats are the most 
popular ones in the Geo. M. Co¬ 
han Theatre.”—N. Y. Morning 
Telegraph, May 31, 1919. 


DIRECT FROM THE 
GRIFFITH REPERTORY SEASON 

“THE FALL OF BABYLON” 
“HEARTS OF THE WORLD” 
“THE MOTHER AND THE LAW” 


Released Through 

D. W. Griffith Service 


Albert L. Grey 

General Manager 
720 Longacre Bldg. 
New York 















you are more important today 

than you were yesterday 

—You started as an Exhibitor. 

—You developed into a showman. 

—You stand today as the guardian of a NEW ART. 

—Yesterday there were but seven—Music, Painting, Literature, Sculpture, Archi¬ 
tecture, Drama, Dancing. 

—TODAY THERE ARE EIGHT. 

—The great editors, authors, painters, musicians, and the great theater-going public 
have proclaimed it. 

D. W. GRIFFITH is the creator 

of the eighth art of the world 

—For years they ridiculed, they scoffed, they ignored, they damned. 

—But now they shout: ..“David Wark Griffith’s commanding pictures are the 
miracle of art.” 

—Thousands of newspaper and magazine columns throughout the civilized world 
have been written in praise of Griffith productions. 

—World critics have searched their memories for vivid words with which to 
voice their praise. 

—To offer D. W. Griffith’s “Big Four” “Broken Blossoms,” “The Fall of Babylon,” 
“The Mother and the Law” and the new revised version of “Hearts of the World”— 
you offer your patrons the greatest attractions ever provided for a theater. 

—And you have the added prestige of the Griffith Repertory Season in New York, 
a season that covered two hundred and four performances on Broadway to the biggest 
business ever known in the history of motion pictures, and at the highest price ever paid 
—$3. a seat. 

book direct through 

D. W. GRIFFITH SERVICE 

720 Longacre Building, New York 




Dorothy Gish 


D. W. GRIFFITH STUDIOS 


Lillian Gish 










Producing Independently 


IN MY OWN STUDIO 


for distribution 


ON THEIR MERITS 


through 


Famous Players-Lasky Corporation Exchange 


LOIS WEBER PRODUCTIONS i 


, 








jc- 


















Cinematograph 

ASSOCIATED WITH 

V 

Lois 

Weber 

Productions 


ADDRESS 

Dal Clawson 

CARE WID’S DAILY, HOLLYWOOD 








William Russell 


IN A STAR SERIES 

for 

The William Fox Co 















TOM MIX 


-and while you fellers are staying home nights listening to home=made beer ferment, you want 

to remember that there’s just one way to keep a dog from going mad in July—and that is to shoot 
him in June! 

WILLIAM FOX WEST COAST STUDIOS, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


















ELINOK FAIK 


WILLIS dr INGLIS 


Featured in Wm. Fox Productions 


Personal Representatives 
















Announcement 


Hampton Del Ruth, who for a period of over five 
years has been intimately identified with the productions 
of all Keystone and Sennett-Paramount Comedies, in 
capacity of managing editor, director and production 
manager^ has severed his connections with the latter 
studio, and is at present engaged in editing and person¬ 
ally supervising the direction of all William Fox Sun¬ 
shine Comedy Productions. 

Mr. Del Ruth personally assures the exhibitor of the 
same high standard of comedy production with which his 
name has been so closely identified in the past. 


Associated Players 


Chester Conklin 
Polly Moran 
Glen Cavender 
Tom Kennedy 
Harry Booker 
Bill Franey 
Alice Davenport 


Ed Kennedy 
Harry McCoy 
Billy Armstrong 
Laura La Varnie 
Jack Cooper 
Slim Somerville 
Ethel Teare 


Maude Wayne 


With a chorus of thirty bathing beauties including 
Marvel Rea, Dorothy Lee, Vera Steadman 


Sunshine Directors 
under the personal supervision of 
Hampton Del Ruth 


Jack Blystone 
Roy Del Ruth 


Frank Griffin 


Eddie Cline 


Vin Moore 






EDDIE CLINE 



Director 

FOX SUNSHINE COMEDIES 














MADLAINE TRAVERSE 

WILLIAM FOX STAR 


Recent Releases: 

“The Caillaiux Case” 

“The Love That Dares” 

“The Danger Zone” 

“Gambling in Souls” 

“When Fate Decides” 

“Rose of the Wilds” 

“The Splendid Sin” Hollywood, California 



HOWARD M. MITCHELL 

Director 

FOX FILM CO. 

WEST COAST STUDIOS 
























HARRY MILLARDE 


Director 


Fox Film Co. 





The World’s Most 
Baby Emotional 


Famous 

Star 


FEATURED UNDER THE 


DIRECTION 


WM. FOX FILM COMPANY 






retained her to play opposite his greatest Star be¬ 
cause he knew she had those attributes necessary 
to hold such a position. She proved her worth in 
•‘THE MAN HUNTER,” with 


WM. A. SEITER 

DIRECTOR 

for 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven 

Current Releases 

by 

Every First Run House 
in America 


and also showed William Fox that she still re¬ 
tained the enormous popularity she had gained in 
her two and a half years as a Star in her own right. 
She has played under the Direction of 

J. GORDON EDWARDS 

in the following 

FOX-FARNUM SUPER FEATURES: 

“The Lone Star Ranger” 

“Wolves of the Night” 

“The Last of the Duanes” 

“Wings of the Morning” 

See Them All and Judge For Yourself 




THE BIG FOUR 

Beauty—Ability—Personality—Popularity 

LOUISE LOVELY 

Has all these,—and more. 


WILLIAM FOX 


WILLIAM FARNUM 













The unprecedented growth of the 



FROM 1917 

TO 




“Smiling Bill” 
Parsons 

Comedies 
- Goldwyn Release 

“Tarzan of the Apes” 

“Romance of Tarzan” 



Mr. and Mrs. 

CarterDetlaven 

Feature Comedies 

- Goldwyn Release 

‘The greatest two-reel 
comedies ever." 

—Charlie Chaplin 

'The De Haven comedy 
“After the Bawl” 

is the cleanest, most art¬ 
istic production 1 have 
ever exhibited. 

The laughs are innumer¬ 
able." —Sid Qrauman 

of Grauman's Million 
Dollar Theatre 



Eddie Elanagan 

and 

Neely Edwards 

Erstwhile 

Vaudeville 

Stars 

Now featured 
in the 

comedy sensation 
of all time 

“The Hall 
Room Boys” 

A series of twenty-six 
two-reel comedies 
a year. 


Ann Little 

and 

Jack Hoxie 

Co-starring 
in the 

Serial Supreme 

“ Lightning 
Bryce” 

Fifteen Episodes 

Each episode a 
stupendous feature 
in itself. 


Henry Walthall 

Super Features 

Released by 

Pioneer Film 
Corp. 


Past Successes: 

“Modern 

Husbands” 

“The 

Long Lane's 
Turning” 

‘The Boomerang’ 

“The Long Arm 
of Mannister 

“The Parted 
Curtains” 


“The Confession’ 

The crowning achieve¬ 
ment of the screen’s 
foremost dramatic star. 

Stupendous in theme. 

Overwhelming in its 
dramatic tenderness — 
it is easily the greatest 
Vehicle ever accorded 
a dramatic artist. 



Billie Rhodes 


Features 

De Luxe 

Released by 

W.W.Hodkinson 

Corporation 

Current Releases: 

“Hoop-La” 

“The Lamb 
and 

The Lion” 

“In Search of 
Arcady” 

“The Love 

Cair 

Forthcoming 
Production :■ 

“The Blue 
Bonnet’’ 

The Screen Event 
of the Year 


I. BERNSTEIN, Production Manager — Studios and Laboratories: Hollywood, Cal. 
JOE BRANDT, Eastern Representative — 126 West 46th Street, New York,\N. Y. 





















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FRANCIS FORD 

INDEPENDENT PRODUCER OF 

SERIALS 

West Coast Studio 
6040*Sunset Boulevard 
Hollywood, Cal. 


1919 Serials 

“ Silent Mystery” 
“ Mystery of 13 ” 


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FOR ARTCRAFT 


THE OTHER HALE 


FLOKbrv^fc, VIDOR 


The House Call 

FOR BRENTWOOD 


Now Under the Direction of 

KING W. VIDOR 


/ 










My personal acquaintance with innumerable Exhibitors 
throughout the country has convinced me that in order 
to retain their confidence and good will, it is necessary 
for me, as a Producer, to do more than make mere pict¬ 
ures. 


I give my personal supervision to the making of the pro¬ 
ductions of Burston Films, Inc., to assure all Exhibitors 
not only artistic excellence, but that box-office value 
which means money to them and satisfaction to their 
audiences. 

I want only that feeling of sincerity and faith to exist 
between the trade and myself. 

LOUIS BURSTON, 

President, Burston Films, Inc. 
























































Another Plum Pipe fo r Picking! 

F ROM the first fade-in to the last fade- 
out it was made for a great money¬ 
making, record-breaking box-office 
attraction—too far over in the book of 
serial production for’ 
any competitor^ to 
equal— 


The Dominant Serial 


Tjhe Mystery of // 

PRESENTED BY LOUIS BURSTON 

with 

FRANCIS FORD and ROSEMARY THEBY 


KING BAGGOT’S 

name means money to 
you. The Title, Pro¬ 
duction and Cast will 
also have an unusual 
value. 


KING BAGGOT 

supported by 
Rhea Mitchell and 

Grace Darmond, 
under my personal su¬ 
pervision, is now star¬ 
ring in the wonder 
super-serial— 


“THE 
HAWK’S | 
TRAIL” 


WATCH 


for the Big Announcement! 


903 Longacre Bldg., New York 

W. H. PRODUCTIONS CO., Distributors 


71 WEST 23rd ST. 
NEW YORK 


LOUIS BURSTON 

President, BURSTON FILMS, Inc. 









































Christie 

Specials 

IN TWO REELS 
RELEASED EACH MONTH 


BOO RED THRU 
FOREMOST 
INDEPENDENT 
EXCHANGES 


Christie 

Comedies 





IN ONE REEL 
RELEASED EACH WEEK 















V GET in touch —immediately 


Mr. State Rights and Foreign Buyer! 


THE PACIFIC PRODUCING CO. 

6100 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Cal. 

yhmounces the coming oj 


THE 


RADIUM 
MYSTERY 

The First SUPER-SERIAL Ever Made! 

ALL STAR CAST 

Cleo Madison - of “The Three of Hearts” 

Eileen Ledgwick - of “The Lure of the Circus” 

Ed. Brady - star heavy of the best pictures 
Bob Reeves - champion horseman 
. f . Bob Kortman - the daredevil of the screen 

ALL* Jeff Osborne - famous character man 

f|P _ l | Gordon McGregor - super villain 

IAKO Robert Grey - almost as mean 


Director, Robert B. Broadwell, formerly with WM. S. HART 
Author, Frederick Bennett, of Helen Holmes Serials, etc. 













Born in Amnington , III. 


Gleo Madison 

F IRST stage experience in the production 
of Captain Swift in 1909 playing emo¬ 
tional leads, then with the Morosco Com¬ 
pany, playing seconds. In 1910 she appeared 
with James K. Hackett in summer stock, play¬ 
ing various roles, and later with Virginia 
Harned. For quite a period afterwards, Miss 
Madison was featured in stock as leading 
woman in most of the coast cities. In 1913 
she entered the motion pictures, joining the 
Universal Company, under the direction of 
Phillips Smalley—Rex Brand, then under the 
direction of Mr. Turner, appearing as lead¬ 
ing woman in the Pirate Series. She played 
leads in the Universal Company, working 
constantly and strenuously. Now, after an*, 
extended rest, she is getting back into the field 
with new enthusiasm and has two or three 
features which she expects to produce in the 
near future. 




“CACTUS NELL” 

“ROPING HER ROMEO” 

“INTERNATIONAL SNEAK” 

“SAFETY-FIRST AMBROSE” 

FRED FISHBACK 

i 

FISHBACK 

COMEDIES 

Directed for :— 

Keystone 

Sennett 

Fox Sunshine 

“AMBROSE’ CUP OF WOE” 
and many others 









To Exhibitors and 
Independent 

Distributors: 

Within the Stern and 
forbidding Walls of our 
COURTS OF LAW 


are enacted dramas more tense, more parched with stress and 
emotion, than any conceived by writers of fiction. 

The Oakley Super-quality Productions 

Presents in 

ONE OF THE “BETTER PICTURES” 



“THE VALLEY OL THE SHADOW 


55 


BIG ALL-STAR SELECT CAST 

Story by FREDERICK BENNETT Scenario by L. Y. JEFFERSON 

“The Valley of the Shadow” is a Six-reel master photodrama 
teeming with the atmosphere of the Court Room; is alive with 
human interest, big with the bigness of life. It is sure to be one 
of the most talked-of productions of the year. 

Write us — NOW—for booking and releasing arrangements 

OAKLEY SUPER-QUALITY PRODUCTIONS 

(INCORPORATED) 

529 WEST 8th STREET LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




































FRANK E. WOODS 


Supervising Director 


Famous Players—Lasky Corporation 

LASKY STUDIOS 

WILLIS CSb INGLIS 

Personal Representatives HOLLY^A/OOD, CAL. 



STAR IN 

Paramount-Artcraft Pictures 


IN MIZZOURA 
‘CAPT. DIEPPE 


SECRET SERVICE” 
TOLD IN THE HILLS 










CURRENT RELEASES: 

“Love Insurance” 

“ Why Smith Left Home” 
“It Pays to Advertise” 


LOIS WILSON 


Famous Players-Lasky Corp’n Hollywood 


O'CONNOR 


MARY 


LOYOLA 


Editor 

SCENARIO AND FILMS 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 


CHARACTERS 

CURRENT RELEASES: 

D. W. Griffith's "TRUE HEART SUSIE" 
Paramount Artcraft "LOVE BURGLAR" 


7002 HAWTHORN AVENUE, HOLLY WOOD — Phone 57792 7 















GEORGE H. MELFORD 


W. S. Campbell 

Creator 

\ 

Directing 


JOE MARTIN COMEDIES 

Special Features 


Produced 

Famous Players— 


FOX SUNSHINE COMEDIES 

Lasky Corporation 





“ROARING LYON” 



and 

Current Releases: 


“WEDDING BELLS” 

"Pettigrew’s Girl” 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

"Men, Women &• Money” 


Key stone-Sennett Releases: 

Features in Production: 


“Taming Target Center ” 

“A Tugboat Romeo” 

"E/verywoman” 


with Violet Heming 


“His First False Step” 

and all-star cast 





“Bucking Society” 

"The Sea Wolf” 



All-star cast 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

"The Roundup” 


Harry Burns 

All-star cast 

• 

• 


Assistant Director 











Allen J. Holubar 


CREATOR OF 


a 


The Heart of Humanity 


V 


“The Right to Happiness 




and 


uC Paid in oAdvance” 


STARRING 


Dorothy Phillips 


•:*** 

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JACQUES JACCARD 

Now Directing 


UNIVERSAL SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS 


Present Feature Now Being Produced 

“CASSIDY OF THE AIR LANES” 


GEORGE A. SIEGMANN 


Directing Universal Features 


UNIVERSAL CITY 


CALIFORNIA 











Kathleen O'Connor 

Costarring with 

James J. Corbett 


in the Big Universal Serial 


Biggest Theatres 


Everywhere 



NORMAN DAWN 



















EUGENE 





>'li In 


Editor 


FEATURE 

PRODUCTIONS 


Pacific Coast Studios 

Universal City California 



MARY MacLAREN 

—-- •" "" - — Starring in ===== 

UNIVERSAL SPECIALS 


Current Releases: 

“The Unpainted Woman” 
“A .Petal on the Current ” 


Universal Studios 


Universal City, Cal. 
























TOD BROWNING 

Directing Special Features 

-UNIVERSAL- 


GEORGE HOLT 

Director 

UNIVERSAL CITY 


Personal Representatives “IVillis & Inglis’’ 



















Monroe, 

Salisbury 

Universal Specials 


Universal City, California 


WILLIAM C. DOWLAN 

directing 

Universal Special Features 

Just Released—Special Attraction 

"LOOT” 

Recent Successes: 

«COWARDICE COURT” (for Fox) and «RESTLESS SOULS” (for Triangle) 



Address: UNIVERSAL CITY, CALIFORNIA 




















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3 3 3 3 

Rex Hodge Roy 11. Klaftki 

Assisted in Production Cinematographer 


H “THE MILLIONAIRE PIRATE” 
I| “THE FIRE FLINGERS” 

II “THE SLEEPING LION” 

II “THE DIVORCED WIFE” 

|| and with the Propaganda Feature 
|| “THE BROOD OF THE 
II BALD EAGLE” 


with 

DOUGLAS J. GERRARD 

Features 

Now Photographing 
MONROE SALISBURY 


|| Address'. 

WID’S DAILY, HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

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LYNN F. REYNOLDS 



Current Releases: 



“A Little Brother of the Rich” 



Just Finished 



“The Brute Breaker” 


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V 



New Affiliation to be Announced Soon 









THE FROHM AN AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 

a rflE~RNS^ CT W% C! |H|jE | CO M EDIES | 

S HI ML ^9 \Jr m '*"' 


THE FEMALE BILL 
HART OF THE SCREEN 

In twenty-six smash¬ 
ing original two-reel 
Westerns, that will 
outshine the feature 
part of any program. 
These productions 
typify the rights, 
glories, and hazards 
of the women of the 
Great West. 

For scenic beauty, 
rapidity of action 
and thrilling stories 
these productions 
merit the high- 
est approval. 


In a series of side 
ticklers, surrounded 
by a bewitching bevy 

of bewildering beau¬ 
ties in comedies clean 
and bubbling over 

with laugh-provoking 

situations. 

Twenty-six single¬ 
reel productions each 
made to suit Mack 
Swain’s peculiar abil¬ 
ities. 


MACK SWAIN 


TEXAS GUI NAN 


HE STANDS 
ALONE 


r Jk pi//The star of a 
mm/J thousand ex- 
pressions in 

\ “THE 

invisible 

RAY” 

Frohman super-se¬ 
rial that upon its 
completion will be 
pronounced the great¬ 
est serial the world 
has ever seen. Miss 
Clifford’s role will 
create a characteriza¬ 
tion entirely new to 
the screen, and af¬ 
fords her opportuni-^# 
ties that every 
other screen star 
will envy. Wf 


THE athletic ^ 
heroic juvenile 
of the screen in 


“THE ^ 
INVISIBLE RAY’ 


a fifteen-episode se¬ 
rial that marks a 
new epoch in the se¬ 
rial field. 

An absorbing story 
that embraces every 
element of thrills, 
suspense, heart in¬ 
terest, hair raising 
situations and 
gSjSk originality. 


RUTH CLIFFORD 


THE FROHMAN AMUSEMENT CORPORATION 

WILLIAM L. SHERRILL, PRES. 

310 TIMES BUILDING NEW YORK CITY 


































































































































































McCarthy 

Picture 

Productions 


Under 

Supervision and Direction 


of 


John P. McCarthy 



A group of all-star creations in varied fields, founded 
on a standard of quality, each with the exquisite detail 
of story, cast, direction and photography embodied in— 


“OUT OF THE DUST” 


—A romance of the West teeming with pioneer drama 
such as the brush of Frederick Remington made 
immortal— 


General Offices, 609 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles 
















Ben Wilson and Neva Gerber 

in the 

SERIAL PHOTOPLAY IN 15 PARTS 

% 

“The Trail of the Octopus’’ 


Ben Wilson Productions 

214 South Harvard Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 


W UALLMACY DKXUDET ■'“* 

CODDOPATION 


BEN WILSON PRODUCTIONS 


FRANK HALL 

Presents 























), 



Not Merely 
“Another Trade Mark” 

but a sign of quality repre¬ 
senting the cream of motion 
picture talent combined to 
attain new standards of 
merit in photoplay pro¬ 
duction. 


A Mark That Guarantees 

a standard of merit attained 
in “Daddy Long Legs,” 
“Rebecca of Sunnybrook 
Farm,” “Stella Maris” and 
“The Unpardonable Sin.” 


MARSHALL NEILAN 

PRODUCTIONS 


Los Angeles 


New York 


Releasing Through The First National Exhibitors' Circuit 


llllli: 




BEN CARRE 

Technical Director 



Principal Works 

Barbary Sheep—Blue Bird—Prunella 

Undying Flame—Sporting Life 

Poor Little Rich Girl 


Now with Marshall Neilan 


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IN 


A WOMAN OF PLEASURE 


THE FIRST OF A SERIES OF 
SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS 


Produced by 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 


Released by 

P ATHE 








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Mary Mclvor 

Leading Woman 


WILLIAM 

DESMOND 

With 

Jesse D. Hampton 


“Life’s a Funny Proposition” 
“The Prodigal Liar” 
“Whitewashed Walls” 
“The Mints of Hell” 
“Barefisted Gallagher” 

“A Sagebrush Hamlet” 
“Dangerous Waters” 










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NOW DIRECTING FOR JESSE D. HAMPTON PRODUCTIONS 


[i J. J. FRANZ 


DIRECTOR 


CURRENT RELEASES : 


Bare-fisted Gallagher 
cA Sagebrush Hamlet 


Starring 

BILL DESMOND 


JUST FINISHED: 
rrc Dangerous Waters” 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 


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Eight Years with Lubin 


Four Years Legitimate 
Stage Experience 


Now Open for Contract 


T.Walker Blair 

Address Care Wid's Daily, Hollywood, Calif. 




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V 



I want my friends, the exhibitors, to feel that 
I now hold myself entirely responsible for the 
high standard and the marketability of my pictures. 




New York Address 
149 BROADWAY 


Studio Address: HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS, INC., 
Seward and Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 


announcement 
will convey the first 
news to exhibitors of the 
formation of my own 
producing company. 

It means a series of 

big S P E C I A L S 

exactingly done with all- 
star casts from the great¬ 
est of stories obtainable. 
The title of the first Car¬ 
lyle Blackwell produc¬ 
tion will soon be 
announced. 


Carlyle Blackwell Productions, Inc. 




















CHARLES SWICKARD 

Director 

OF THE FOLLOWING SUCCESSES: 

“THE TOAST OF DEATH” 

with LOUISE GLAUM 

“THE BEGGAR OF CAWNPORE” 

Featuring HENRY B. WARNER 

“HELL’S HINGES” 

with WM. S. HART 

“THE CAPTIVE GOD” 

with WM. S. HART 

“LIGHT OF THE WESTERN STARS” 

with DUSTIN FARNUM 

“HITTING THE HIGH SPOTS” 

“THE SPENDER” 

“FAITH” 

with BERT LYTELL 

Mr. Swickard has been engaged by the Carlyle 
Blackwell Productions, Inc., to direct Mr. Blackwell 
in a series of super-features specially written and pre¬ 
pared for this well-known star. 

HIS FIRST PICTURE IS NOW UNDER 
PRODUCTION, RELEASE TITLE (?) TO BE 
ANNOUNCED SHORTLY. 

Hollywood California 





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|| 

E a 

Clyde DeVinna 

11 

Cinematograph 

Has Photographed the Following 

STARS || 

Wm. S. Hart || 

H. B. Warner 

E E 

Dorothy Dalton 
Enid Bennett 

Bessie Barriscale 
Kitty Gordon 

Bessie Love If 

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Now Photographing 

Carlyle Blackwell 

|j (The title of this Production will be ft 
announced shortly) 

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For Consistent Photography 
See WID’S REVIEWS 


Complete Bell & Howell Outfit 

Permanent Address: 

WID’S DAILY 


Hollywood, California 



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1 -o 



Kathleen Kirkbam 


Personal Representatives 

WILLIS & INGLIS 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 






















// 

V \ 


Distributors 

SHORT FEATURES/ 














NEAL HART 


Distributed by 

CAPITAL FILM CO. 


IN SNAPPY 

TWO REEL SUPER-WESTERNS 

Re/eases Now*Available 


NEAL HART 


| 24 IN NUMBER 

“A KNIGHT OF WESTERN LAND” 
“THE DEAD LINE” 

“THE SQUARE SHOOTER” 

“OUT OF THE WEST” 

Available one every two weeks 


Studios Hollywood, Gal. 


CONSUMERS BLDG., CHICAGO, ILL. 


DOUGLAS 

BRONSTON 

DIRECTING 

Neal 

Hart 

Representation through 

THE MABEL CONDON EXCHANGE 









AL. JENNINGS 


NOW APPEARING IN A SERIES OF 
24 TWO-REEL SUPER FEATURES 

True Life Portrayals of Actual Happenings in 
His Most Eventful Career 


To Include the Filming of the 

“JENNINGS-O. HENRY 


Now Being Run in the Leading Newspapers 
of the United States in Serial Form 

Distributed By 

Capital Film Company 

CONSUMERS BLDG. CHICAGO, ILL. 

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| VIVIAN CANE 

Supporting 

\ AL. JENNINGS 

In a Series of 

I 24 TWO-REEL DRAMATIC 
| SENSATIONS 

I RELEASE EVERY TWO WEEKS 

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I 

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! CHICAGO, ILL. 

5 * 

AL. JENNINGS PHOTOPLAY CO. H. M. OWENS, G’n'IM'g'r STUDIOS HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 









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MAY ALLISON 

Current Release 

“FAIR AND WARMER” 






































BERT LYTELL 

CURRENT RELEASE 

LOMBARDI, Ltd. 

METRO 















Jupe /T^atfyis 

Head of Scenario Department 

— /T\etro — 



M. P. STAULCUP 

c 'Art director 

METRO PICTURES CORPORATION 

Nazimova Production “The Brat” 

“Lombardi, Ltd.” 

“The Willow Tree,” Etc. 

Two Years Prizma Color Films 















‘;\VyV 


LET DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS UNLOCK THE DOOIT TO 


PROFITS 


WITH 


HIS MAJESTY 


THE AMERICAN 


READY 

SEPTEMBER FIRST 








VICTOR FLEMING 

Director 

Douglas Fairbanks Picture Corporation 


Max Parker 

Ted Reed 

AKT DIRECTOK 

SCENARIO EDITOR 

FOR 

Douglas Fairbanks Pictures Corporation 

AND 

AND 

Publicity Representative 

The Mary Pickford Co. 

Douglas Fairbanks Pictures 
Corporation 









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“BRUNTON SERVICE” 

Is the same guarantee in motion picture production that the 

STERLING STAMP 


IS ON SILVER 

It Means the Product is Genuine! 

“Brunton Service” is the synonym for efficiency, excellence and 

satisfaction in production. 

The Robert Brunton Studios have made it possible for any one to 
produce motion pictures without having to own a costly studio. 

This has been accomplished by providing a perfectly equipped 
plant of 554 acres of buildings and locations where pictures 
may be made on the cost-plus or flat-rate basis. 


THE ROBERT BRUNTON STUDIOS, Inc. 

5341 Melrose Avenue Los Angeles, Gal. 


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Robekt Bkunton 

Productions 





ROBERT BRUNTON 

presents 

J. Warren Kerrigan 

in his own company in a series of 

SPLENDID FEATURES 

supported by a 

STAR CAST 

Directed by Ernest G. Warde 


Each picture to be a 

Robert Brunton Production 


Distributed by 

W. W. Hodkinson Gorp. 


ROBERT BRUNTON STUDIOS, Inc. 

5301 to 5601 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 
















A KEENAN PICTURE 

Current Releases : 

“The Master Man” 

“The Gates of Brass” 

“The False Code” 

and 

THE SENSATIONAL EXPOSE OF INDUS¬ 
TRIAL UNREST-WITH A SOLUTION 

“The World Aflame” 

P ATHE 

DISTRIBUTORS 

FRANK KEENAN PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 

5341 MELROSE AVENUE 
LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 


IS A SAFE BET 










‘All of a Sudden Norma.” “Tangled 

‘A Trick of Fate.” “The Woman Michael 
‘Hearts Asleep.” “Her Purchai 

‘Josselyn’s Wife.” “Battling 

Management of J. L. Frothingham 
Direction of Howard Hickman 

Produced during 1919 by 


B. B. FEATURES, Inc 


5341 Melrose Avenue 
Los Angeles, Gal. 





1 


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Albert Roscoe 

LEADS 


Current Release: 


BESSIE BARRISCALE’S 

“Her Purchase Price” 


HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 


ERNEST C. WARDE 


DIRECTOR 


The Following Successes: 

“VICARo WAKEFIELD” with Frederick Warde 
“THE MIDNIGHT STAGE” “ Frank Keenan 
“THE WORLD AFLAME” “ Frank Keenan 

Now Directing, J. WARREN KERRIGAN 


“Tob r” 

“White Man’s Chance 


CURRENT RELEASES: 

u 



Joyous Liar” 


PRESENT PRODUCTION 


“The Lord Loves the Irish” 
























Frank Borzage 

DIRECTOR 

“Billy Jim’’ 

“The Duke of Chimney Butte” 


NOW WITH 

FRED STONE 


Represented by 


WILLIS & INGLIS 










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In Preparation 

“THE DRAGON PAINTER,’’ by Fenollosa 

Just Finished 

“THE ILLUSTRIOUS PRINCE,” by Oppenheim 

Ready for Release 

“THE MAN BENEATH,” bv Edmund Mitchell 
“THE GREAT HORIZON,” by Clifford Howard 

Released 

“HIS DEBT,” by Jefferson-Greihan 
“COURAGEOUS COWARD,” by Thos. Geraghty 
“A HEART IN PAWN” (Stage Success), Hayakawa 
“BONDS OF HONOR,” by Clara Whipple 
“HIS BIRTHRIGHT,” by Denison Clift 

Pathe 

BRYANT WASHBURN, in “All Wrong” (Late Release) 
“Twenty-one,” and “Ghost of the Rancho” 

Goldwyn 

MAE MARSH, in the “Beloved Traitor” 

Bluebird 

FRANKLIN FARNUM in “The Stranger from Somewhere,” 
“The Man Who Took a Chance,” “Love Never Dies,” Etc. 
LEAH BAIRD, in “The Devil’s Pavdav” 

HERBERT RAWLINSON and ANN LITTLE, one year 


Address: 



WILLIAM WORTHINGTON 

DIRECTOR OF 

SESSUE HAYAKAWA 

HAWORTH PICTURES CORPORATION 


HAWORTH PICTURES CORPORATION 

Los Angeles 


LLOYD INGRAHAM 


Just Finished: 1| 

“WHAT'S YOUR HUSBAND DOING?" || 

for Thomas H. I nee II 


Now Directing for 

HAWORTH PICTURES CORPORATION 
HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA 













Paul M. Powell 

Directing 

MARY PICKFORD 


First Release 
“POLLYANA” 


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Charles Rosher 


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In Charge of Photography 


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Mary Pickford Productions 


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PRODUCTIONS 1918-1919 


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“Captain Kidd, Jr.” 



“Johanna Enlists” 


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“How Could You Jean” 



“Daddy Long Legs” 


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“The Hoodlum” 


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“The Heart of the Hills” 














“THE MIRACLE MAN” 

was the first of a series of six special 
personally produced 

George Loane Tucker 

productions that you to are able to book 

Independently on their Merits 

at all 

PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT EXCHANGES 

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NEW YORK OFFICE 
25 WEST 45th STREET 


5341 MELROSE AVENUE 
(Robert Brunton Studio) 
Phone 4080 Hollywood 


FEDERAL PHOTOPLAYS 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Producing for 

ZANE GREY PICTURES, Inc. 

GREAT AUTHORS PICTURES, Inc. 
BENJ. B. HAMPTON 


LOS ANGELES 


Zane Grey Pictures 


CURRENT RELEASE 


« 


DESERT GOLD” 


NOW IN PRODUCTION 


<< 


DESERT WHEAT” 


Great Authors Pictures 

CURRENT RELEASE 

“THE WESTERNERS” 

By Stewart Edward White 


NOW IN PRODUCTION 

“THE SAGEBRUSHER” 

By Emerson Hough 


























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LOMBAKDI, LTD. 

for 

M E T K O 


A/ou; ‘Directing 
ZANE GREY 

Features for 

B. B. HAMPTON 


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RECENT RELEASES: 

“The Girl Dodger” 

( ‘Greased L igh tning 
“The Rusher” 

“Hay-foot, Straw-foot” 
“Bill -Henry ” 


JEROME STORM 


Directing CHARLES RAY 


Thomas H. Ince Studios 


Culver City, California 

















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THOS. H. INGE—PARAMOUNT FEATURE 


ENID BENNETT 


In a Series of Photoplays of Distinctive Merit 


THE MARRIAGE RING 
WHEN DO WE EAT? 
FUSS AND FEATHERS 
HAPPY THO MARRIED 
PARTNERS THREE 


LAW OF MEN 
HAUNTED BEDROOM 
STEPPING OUT 
VIRTUOUS THIEF 
GAY MISS FORTESQUE 


All Personally Directed By 


FRED NIBLO 

Who is Now Busily Engaged in the Direction of the 

Gigantic 


THOS. H. INCE 

SUPER-SPECIAL 


“AMERICANISM” 

By G. GARDNER SULLIVAN 


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DOUGLAS McLEAN 
and DORIS MAY 

THOMAS H. INCE PRODUCTIONS 


Current Releases: 

“TWENTY-THREE AND A HALF HOURS LEAVE” 

By Mary Roberts Rinehart 

“WHAT’S YOUR HUSBAND DOING” 

By George V. Hobart 

“MARY’S ANKLE’’ By May Tully 


HENRY KING 

Director^ 


Thomas H. Ince Studios 


Personal Representatives “Willis & Inglis” 



















In the Coming Season in Pre¬ 
paring and Producing a series of 






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GOLDWYN 

I shall be able to 
give you my very 
best creative effort 

££CA C/5£ 


I shall have my own unit 
organization and the ex¬ 
cellent and comprehen¬ 
sive co-operation of the 


MAIL 


GOLDWYN ORGANIZATION 


PERCY HILBURN CHAS. STALLINGS 

Photographer 


Assistant Director 














I have been asked to contribute (at so much a contrib) to Wid’s Year Book. 
Being new in this business I didn’t know who this bird (with that dehorned name) 
was and as for his Year Book, I didn’t know they issued an almanac in the Mov¬ 
ing Picture Business. He said in his letter that he was very deserving and had 
done a lot for the business. Now before I jarred myself loose from any coin (as 
Goldwyn don’t pay for this ad) I looked up this guy’s references and found he had 
done a lot for the business. He had told the truth about it and I found that his 
publication was as much sought after in the movie industry as the Police Gazette 
used to be in the barber shops. He says his book is rehash of last year’s pictures 
—personally I think the dead should be allowed to remain. President Wilson and 
I each have fourteen points. He took his to Paris where they not only saw 
his fourteen but raised him twelve more, I brought my fourteen points to the coast. 
The first five and principal of mine are a wife .and four children in itself consti¬ 
tutes a novelty in this business, that is provided you still live with them. 

Point number six: I heard there was a movement on to revive 
moving pictures. 1 

Point number seven: Producers decided to make fewer and worse 
pictures. They may make fewer but they will never make worse. 

Point number eight: I hold the distinction of being the ugliest man 
in pictures. 

Point number nine: Caruso and I and Jesse Willard were the 
last to go in. \ 

Point number ten: Goldwyn figured by getting a good cast and 
good story, it would about offset the action of the star. 

Point number eleven: I can’t roll a cigarette with one hand and 
can’t whip but one man at a time (and he must be littler than I am). 

Point number twelve: I made a picture last year and some theatres 
bought it. So they figured if I made another one they could double the 
sale on this one. Get two to use it. 

Point number thirteen: Moving pictures are the only way in the 
world that you can play a town and not have to worry about the hotels. 

Point number fourteen: It’s the only business where you can sit out 
front and applaud yourself. 

WILL ROGERS. 

P. S. If I don’t last in the business till the next Year Book is issued I take 
this means now of wishing everybody Good Luck as I have certainly met some 
fine folks out here in the business. I love it and only hope I am able to string 
along with you even if its in the rear and Oh you know what I like, to forget the 
climate, isn’t it dear? Turkey is the only other prohibition country in the world 
besides us. If we enjoyed a few of their privileges it wouldn’t be so bad. 


























L 


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Victor Schertzinger 

M.P. D.A. 

Supervising and Directing 

MABEL NORMAND 

for G O L D W Y N 
Current Releases: 


“JINX 


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“UPSTAIRS” 

“WHEN DOCTORS DISAGREE” 


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THE EMPTY PARADISE 




Just completed a PAULINE FREDERICK FEATURE 

Title to be announced soon 

. 

Directed the following CHARLES RAY releases: 

“STRING BEANS” “HIS OWN HOME TOWN” 

“NINE O’CLOCK TOWN” “THE CLODHOPPER” 

“THE PINCH HITTER” And 19 Other Charles Ray Successes 

Directed DOROTHY DALTON in 

“EXTRAVAGANCE” “QUICKSANDS” 

“THE HOME BREAKER” “HARD BOILED” 

“OTHER MEN’S WIVES” 

Address: Culver City, California 


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TO EXHIBITORS AND PRODUCERS THE NAME 

T. HAYES HUNTER 

On Photoplays Means Pleased Patrons and Inereased Receipts 

at the Box Office 

Past Successes Which You All Remember 

“THE SEATS OF THE MIGHTY” 

BLANCHE BATES in a Special Production 

“THE BORDER LEGION” 

Released by Goldwyn Film Corporation 
JACK SHERILL and MABEL WITHEE 

“ONCE TO EVERY MAN” 

RELEASED BY W. L. SHERILL 
Frohman Amusement Corporation 

One of the Season’s Real Big Box Office Winners 

“DESERT GOLD” 

DIRECTED BY T. HAYES HUNTER 
DISTRIBUTION BY W. W. HODKINSON 

In Course of Preparation, A Big Special Production. 
Cast and Title Announced Later 


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T. HAYES HUNTER 

PERMANENT ADDRESS: 

The Lambs Club, West 44th Street, New York 

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FRANK LLOYD 

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Goldwyn Studios 

Personal Representatives ^Willis & Inglis” 


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WILLIAM PARKE 

Now Directing 

PAULINE FREDERICK 

in 

“The Paliser Case” 

For Goldwyn 

Address: 

1637 POINSETTA PLACE HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 


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TOM 


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Directing" 

TOM MOORE 


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HARRY 


BEAUMONT 


Goldwyn 

Features 


Goldwyn Features 














KITE LESTER 

now with 

GOLDWYN 

WEST COAST STUDIOS 

Past Six Years with 
Famous Players 
and World 

Stage Experience 

-— with - 

Kichard Mansfield 
Wm. N. Crane 
Julia Marlowe 
John Drew 
Mrs. Fisk 

Address: 

CULVER CITY :: CALIFORNIA 


Wm. C. (Billy) F oster 
Ctnematogiapfjer! 

Photographed the following Stars: 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
WILLIAM FARNUM 
H. B. WARNER 

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Now Photographing 

REX BEACH’S 
“Silver Horde” 

Directed by 

FRANK LLOYD 

Address: 

h 

American Society of Cinematographers 

Markham Bldg., Hollywood, Gal. 





























Maurice Tourneur Productions 

INCORPORATED 



MAURICE TOURNEUR 

DIRECTOR 

&f 

“Sporting Life,” “Woman,” “Romany Rye” 
“My Lady’s Garter,” “White Heather” 
“Broken Butterfly” 




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Paton Films, 


NOW PRODUCING THE SERIAL 

“THE SIGN 

OF THE RAT” 


STUART PATON 
Director General 



Studio of the Paton Films, Inc. The only studio of its kind in the 
world, located at Santa Monica Bay, Calif. Extends 500 feet in the 
ocean. A great many artistic and novel effects will be produced here 
under the direction of Mr. Paton. 


ADDRESS 


Nat Goodwin Pier 

Hollister Ave. and Ocean Front, Santa Monica, Calif. 


gg Stuart Paton, Director General Dr. Henry Noel Potter, Gen. Manager 


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Louis J. Gasnier 
Productions 

Starring 

Lew J. Cody 

In Six 

Special Productions 





L 


Sidney L. Cokan, Sales Manager, Astra Studio, Glendale,'Cal 












WILLIAM 

CHRISTY 

CABANNE 











Louis J. Gasnier 


Presents 


Lew Cody Productions 


Christy Cabanne 


Director 


J. A. Dubray 

Cameraman 


Frank. D. Ormston 

Art Director 


J. A. Brennan 

Organ Trio 


A. G. Sprague 

Technical Director 


William E. Howard 

Properties 


Wayne Denver Harman 

Electrician 







Eileen Percy 


Co-Featuring in the 


PATHE SERIAL 


“The Third Eye” 


Current Release 


“THE BELOVED CHEATER” 


♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> • ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> 

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MARK STRONG 
/VozeJ Playing 

Captain Gale 

in 

“THE THIRD EYE” 
Astra Serial 
Latest Release 
Gordon—Heavy Lead 
“THE TIGER’S TRAIL” 
Astra Serial 


JACK MOWER 

Leads 

Current Production 


“THE BELOVED CHEATER” 

Now Playing in 

“THE THIRD EYE” 


A Serial Being Produced by Astra 























Marlin swordfish weigh¬ 
ing 229% pounds, caught 
by Dustin Farnum at 
Catalina, August 15, 1919, 
in forty minutes. 


T HIS isn’t quite as easy as it looks, men — but it’s 
a great way to keep in condition between pictures \ 

DUSTIN FARNUM 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 


DUSTIN FARNUM FEATURES 
Released through 

United Picture Theatres of America 















Announcement 


Comedies 


DISTRIBUTED 

BY 


FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPH ZUK0R Pres. JESSE L.LASKY Vice Pres. CECIL B. DE MULE Director General 
• <T)EW YORK. J 

































J. A. DUBRAY I 

Camera Man 


Member American Society 
of Cinematographers. 


Head camera man for Pathe 
organization in the United 
States for four years. 


Fifteen years spent in get¬ 
ting the most out of the 
motion picture camera in ef¬ 
fects—in lighting—in art. 


NOW WITH 

Lew Cody Productions ] 


Address : 

aAstra. Studio 

GLENDALE CALIFORNIA 




EDWIN L. 
HOLLYWOOD 

Director 


Address 

Green Room Club 
New York City 












T. 



BABY MARIE OSBORNE 

Can you imagine Marie and her little lamb in 

“LITTLE BO-PEEP” 

Great news is in store for this little lady’s admirers in the near future— 
so watch out, Mr. Exhibitor! 


















OSBORNE 

PRESENTS 


EDYTHE STERLING 

-the charming and virile central personality in five-reel rugged Westerns. 

-a young woman whose marvellous horsemanship and thrilling feats of 

reckless daring surpass the usual stunts of the male daredevils. 

First Production—“THE ARIZONA CAT-CLAW” 

Released by World Film Corp., 130 W. 46th Street, New York 






























J. Grubb Alexander 

ORIGINALS TITLES CONTINUITIES 

Forthcoming Releases 

“THE THUNDERBOLT” 

“THE BEAUTY MARKET” 

FOR 

Katherine MacDonald Productions 

A First National Exhibitors Release 

“THE COUNTY FAIR” 

Titles and Editing 

“THE LIFE LINE" 

“THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY" 

Maurice Tourneur Productions 


“The Trail of the Octopus” 

A fifteen part serial produced by Ben Wilson Productions 
to be distributed, by Frank G. Hall 


“THE INNOCENT CHEAT" 

FOR 

Carlyle Blackwell Productions 

Address: Hollywood, California 






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■give me 
a star 
and 

a story! 


THE LONG LANE’S TURN¬ 
ING . Henry B. Walthall 

THE GIRL OF MY 
DREAMS . Billie Rhodes 

HOOP-LA . Billie Rhodes 

THE LOVE GALL, 

Billie Rhodes 

THE BLUE BONNET, 

Billie Rhodes 


Louis William Chaudet 


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.♦ ♦,♦ ♦.♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦ ♦> ♦♦ ♦> ♦ ♦ ♦> ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦> ♦MHKH' 

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MAHLON HAMILTON 


Recent Releases: 


“PLAYTHINGS OF PASSION” 
“DADDY LONG LEGS” 
“KINGDOM OF DREAMS” 
“IN OLD KENTUCKY” 


(With Kitty Gordon) 
(With Mary Pickford) 

(With Anita Stewart) 


Hollywood, California 












5^01^17005^ 

A Dainty Personality, Beloved 
Of Motion Picture Pafis 

Miss Stonehouse has been directing 
a very successful series of two-reel 
comedies—while from every nook 
and corner of the land, the query 
has come, “WHERE IS RUTH 
STONEHOUSE?” 

Box 18 , Wid's Daily, Hollywood, Calij. 



ANNA Q. NILSSON 

Current Releases: 

'Soldiers of Fortune’ 

'"The Luck of the Irish ' 


/ 





















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Mayflower Photoplay 
Corporation 


FIRST PRESENTATION IS 


George Loane Tucker’s 


PRODUCTION 


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“THE MIRACLE MAN 




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Mayflower Photoplay Corporation 

is striving 

to live up to this standard 
in all its productions 


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ISAAC WOLPER 
President 


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1465 Broadway 


New York City 


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APPEARING IN LEADS 

A talented, beautiful young lady; popular be¬ 
cause of her lovable personality, intelligence, 
and ability as an artistic performer. 


Now in a 6 reel photodrama of the greatest 
human interest. 

An Oakley Super-quality Production 


YVONNE GARDELLE 


“The Valley of 

story by FREDERICK B. BENNETT 

Supervising the Productions of 

OAKLEY 

Super-quality Photoplays 

ONE OF THE PIONEERS 

For Photoplays of the 

Highest Artistic Quality 

529 W. 8th St. Los Angeles, Cal. 


the Shadow” 

Scenario by L. V. JEFFERSON 


■ •: > ■ ■ 




J.sw. (RUBE) EARLY 









JUANITA 

HANSEN 


STARRING IN 

■« 

Selig Productions 

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TO HEAD HER 
OWN COMPANY 

JANUARY 1st 



Mildred Considine 

ORIGINAL 

STORIES 

6621 ST. FRANCIS COURT 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 














UALITY is the keynote of Policy—announce¬ 
ments made today by all wide-awake producers 

, throughout the Motion Picture Industry.- 

In the final analysis “The Print” as seen on the screen 
is the determining factor with the audience, and classi¬ 
fies your effort as success or failure.- 

The release laboratory is the last step between the 
public and your picture, and the selection of your 
laboratory determines whether your picture has that 
QUALITY which makes distinction or is merely one 
of many.- 

It has been our endeavor in the past, and will be more 
so in the future to give to the producer our unsparing 
effort and every facility which our exceptional organi¬ 
zation commands that his production may reach the 
eye of the public as he desires it should.- 

SANBORN LABORATORIES CORPORATION 

Culver City, California 






































































































































































MABEL BALLIN 

CURRENT RELEASES 


Maurice Tourneur’s 

The White Heather 
The Illustrious Prince 

with Sessue Hayakawa 

Lord and Lady Algy 

and 

The Beach Combers 

HUGO BALLIN, Director 

Address Wid's Daily, Hollywood, Calif. 


“Better” Pictures 

— that Pay 

Brentwood s Promise:- 

That all Brentwood pictures shall be 
strong in human interest, true to life 
itself in their drama and comedy,, 
wholesome and eminently worth 
while to all sections of the picture 
public; and that they shall bring 
pride and profit to every exhibitor 
who plays them. 

Brentwood s Performance:- 

“The Turn in the Road” 

acclaimed as ‘one picture in a thous¬ 
and’—‘the picture that makes us 
think.’ Released March 16 and 
playing to steadily increasing busi¬ 
ness throughout the country. 

“Better Times” 

Released June 29. Having in it the 
same qualities which made “The 
Turn in the Road” so striking a suc¬ 
cess—the same human value —being 
as rich in bright, unstrained comedy 
and in deep pathos as was “The 
Turn in the Road” in drama. 

“The Other Half” 

Now being completed. Watch for 
release. 

Direction of King W. Vidor 


Releases through: 

Robertson-Cole Co. and the Exhibitors Mutual 


BrentwoodFilmC orporation 

Lloyd C. Haynes, President 
4811 Fountain Ave. Los Angeles, Cal. 



















1 




Wesley Ruggles 

Directing 

OWEN MOORE 

Assistant 

FRANK KINGSLEY 

SELZNICK PICTURES CORP. 


2 







JACK CUNNINGHAM 


Phone 579029 


196 Vista del Mar 
Hollywood, California 


Edward 

T. Lowl, Jr. 

Goldwyn 

Season 

1919-20 

Dramatizations 


“THE WORLD AND ITS WOMAN” 

“BONDS OF LOVE”. 

“TOBY’S BOW”. 

“THE STREET CALLED STRAIGHT” - 

Garaldine Farrar—Lou Tellegen 

Pauline Frederick 

Eminent Author’s Production 

Address 

GOLDWYN 


CULVER CITY 

CALIF. 












................. 

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PAUL WEIGEL 


Current Releases: 

"EVANGELINE” (as Father Felician) 
"LOVE IS LOVE" 

"LOVE IN PAWN” 


Hollywood, Cal. 


Actors' Association 



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“Los Angeles is becoming one of the greatest literary 
markets of the world. Thoughts that can be filmed are 
worth more to the makers of motion pictures than to 
publishers.” D. W. Griffiths. 


EDNA SCHLEY 


Representing the foremost authors of America and England 


Recent Contracts 

ARISTOCRAT AND ALLEY-CAT by J. G. Hawks.Mary Pickford 

THE RELAY GIRL by B. M. Bower.Maurice Tourneur 

A PRODIGAL IN UTOPIA by Donn Byrne.Thos. H. Ince 

JIM OF THE RANGES by G. B. Lancaster.Universal—Harry Carey 

SUNDOWN TRAIL by J. G. Hawks.Universal—Monroe Salisbury 

PLAYING THE GAME by Sada Cowan. Universal—Special 

THE LAW BRINGERS by G. B. Lancaster.Special 

THE BEACH COMBER by J. G. Hawks.Elmo Lincoln 

TRIAL OF THE OCTOPUS by Norris Shannon and Ben Wilson Serial 

Walter Woods 

THE YANKEE PRINCESS by Bernard McConville.Bessie Love 


324 MARKHAM BUILDING 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 
TELEPHONE 577941 


THE RIGHT STORY 
TO THE RIGHT PRODUCER 
AT THE RIGHT MOMENT 


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JACK GILBERT, Juvenile Leads 

Personal Representatives WILLIS Sc 1NGL1S 


IN THE LATEST 


MARY PICKFORD’S 

Heart of the Hills 

MAURICE TOUNEUR’S 

White Heather 

and 

GEORGE LOANE TUCKER’S 

Second Paramount Artcraft 

SPECIAL 


IRVING CUMMINGS 

PASSION 

IN 


“ EVER Y WOMAN ” 



















King W. Vidor 

PRODUCER-DIRECTOR 

Mr. Vidor is Director and Author of the following 

successes: 

“The Turn in the Road” 

“Better Times” 

“The Better Half” 

. Title of his present production to be announced soon. 

HOLLYWOOD California 


Philo McCollough 

Current Releases: — 

“ THE SPLENDID HAZARD ” 
“THE GAYLORD QUEX” 
“SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE” 
“LADY AND LORD ALGY” 
“MARKET OF SOULS” 

“QUICK SANDS” 

Address 

Box 25 WID’S DAILY, Hollywood, Calif, 
























Winifred Westover 


Recent Releases: 

“HOBBS IN A HURRY” 
With Bill Russell 

“ALL THE WORLD TO 
NOTHING” 

With Bill Russell 

“THIS HERO STUFF” 
With Bill Russell 

“JOHN PETTICOATS” 
With Wm. S. Hart 

Address : Box 22, Wid’s Daily, Hollywood, Cal 



George L. Cox 

M. P. D. A. 

Directing 

American Film Company 
Productions 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL. 











ROBERT T. 
THORNBY 

Producer 

With 

Jesse D. Hampton 


II Finished: 

|| “The Prince and Betty” 


HELEN CASE || 

with Ruth Roland Company in ff 
“THE ADVENTURES OF RUTH’’ || 


with 

William Desmond 


Formerly: 
Dramatic Stock 
With Elsie Janis 
With Marie Cahill 


|| In Preparation: 


“CRESSY” 


“The Cowboy and the Lady” (Metro) I! 
with S. Miller Kent 

“The Thumb Print” (Vitagraph) 
with Earle Williams 


with 


Blanche Sweet 


With Thomas H. Ince 


Personal Representation through The Mabel Candon Exchange, Los Angeles. 











Miriam Cooper 

Featured in 


R. A. Walsh Productions 


























f/////////////////*/////*/////f/////////////////// 







All Through the Year 
Remember: — 

When you, as an exhibitor, are trying to 
think of a happy, fun-making, laughter cre¬ 
ating, pretty comedienne and ingenue who 
ought to have a regular place in your 
theatre: 

When you are wondering why you haven’t 
found just the young girl star you know 
everybody will like: 

Then: 

Think of 

BILLIE RHODES 

and her National Film Corporation special 
productions made for release through the 
Hodkinson organization. 

Then book her productions. 

You have found the answer. 

At the time WID’S ANNUAL goes to press 
in the Fall of 1919 her new productions 
made or in the making are: 

"THE BLUE BONNET”: A story with a 
smile and a tear, by E. Magnus Ingleton. 

"HEARTS AND MASKS” by Harold 
McGrath; a world-known,popular novel. 

"MARY MINDS HER BUSINESS” by 
George Weston, a famous Ladies’ Home 
Journal syrial novel read by 20,000,000 
people between August 1919 and March 
1920. 

W. HODKINSON CORPORATION 

527 Fifth Avenue. New York City 

Distributing through PAIHf Exchange, Incorporated 


////////////////////////A 


’///////* 












George Elwood Jenks 

CONTINUITY- RECONSTRUCTION - SPECIALS 


Recent Adaptations and Originals 


Starring Blanche Sweet— 

A WOMAN OF PLEASURE 

Starring H. B. Warner— 

THE MAN WHO TURNED 
WHITE 

THE PAGAN GOD 


Starring Wm. Desmond— 

THE PRODIGAL LIAR 
WHITEWASHED WALLS 
THE MINTS OF HELL 
A SAGEBRUSH HAMLET 
DANGEROUS WATERS 


Other Releases Starring—Olive Thomas, William Russell, Ruth Stonehouse, 
Margery Wilson, Roy Stewart, Pauline Starke, Joe King, Jack Richardson, Walt 
Whitman, Jack Livingston and J. Warren Kerrigan. 

JESSE D. HAMPTON PRODUCTIONS. HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 


JAMES 

YOUNG 

Directing Elsie Janis 

Recent Releases: 

"The Wolf" 

“The Highest Trump 

" The White Man s Law 

“The Temple of Dusk 

“On Trial" 

“Sweet Kitty Belairs 

“Oliver 

rn • 

I wist 













Charles Clary 

Recent Four Pictures 

EXTRAFAG ANCE 

In ce 

THE STRONGER LOVE 

Goldwyn 

THE SPLENDID SIN 

Fox 

A GIRL NAMED MARY 

Paramount Artcraft 


There is a Bank 

—in Hollywood, California, 

—close and convenient to the STUDIOS 
grouped in that important center of motion 
picture activity, 

—whose EFFICIENT SERVICE 

FRIENDLY, INFLUENTIAL co¬ 
operation 

BROAD KNOWLEDGE of film 
finance 

—and UNDERSTANDING of film affairs 

—have won the confidence and patronage of 
practically the entire ‘film colony in and 
around Hollywood and Los Angeles. 


COMBINED AGGREGATE DEPOSITS: 

Four and a Half Million Dollars 


OFFICERS 

EDWIN O. PALMER 
President 
B. S. PHELPS 
Vice-President 
G. G. GREENWOOD 
Vice-President 
RALPH C. LONG 
Cashier 

FRANK K. GALLOWAY 
Assistant Cashier 
GEO. R. DODGE 
Assistant Cashier 


DIRECTORS 

P. J. BEVERIDGE 
E. F. BOGARDUS 
R. H. COWPER 
G. G. GREENWOOD 
RALPH C. LONG 
EDWIN O. PALMER 
B. S. PHELPS 


Producers, Players, Directors and all indi¬ 
viduals connected with the film industry will 
find a VALUABLE and PLEASANT con¬ 
nection in an account with 


Hollywood National Bank 

AND THE 

Citizens Savings Bank 

Cahisenga Avenue and Hollywood Boulevard, 
Hollywood, California. 





























American Society of Cinematographers 

OUR MOTTO: LOYALTY, PROGRESS, ART 

OUR IDEAL: That membership in this Society may 
become a mark of honor and distinction based on merit. 


T HIS organization has been formed for the purpose of bringing into the 
closest confederation all—but only—those leaders in the cinematographic 
science whose attainments in their chosen field entitle them to member¬ 
ship in this Society, for the purpose of maintaining the high standard set for 
themselves—and at the same time promote the interest and welfare and pro¬ 
tect the rights of all who shall be so fortunate as to be called to membership. 

At this date our membership consists of the 
following cinematographers : 

MEMBERS 


Philip E. Rosen, President 
Charles G. Rosher, Vice-President 
Homer A. Scott, Second Vice-President 
W. C. Foster, Treasurer 
Victor Milner, Secretary 


John Arnold 
Joe August 
Friend F. Baker 
William J. Beckway 
L. D. Clawson 
Henry Cronjager 
Arthur Edeson 
Ernest Depew 
Eugene Gaudio 
Gaetone G. Gaudio 
Frank B. Good 
King D. Gray 


Walter L. Griffin 
Albert G. Heimerl 
F. W. Jackman 
J. D. Jennings 
Charles E, Kaufman 
Roy H. Klaffki 
H. F. Koenekamp 
Edward Kull 
Sam Landers 
Walter Lundin 
Chester A. Lyons 
Hugh C. McClung 
Robert S. Newhard 


Stephen S. Norton 
E. Palmer 
Paul P. Perry 
Lewis W. Physioc 
Sol Polito 
George Rizard 
A. Scholtz 
John F. Seitz 
R. H. Totheroh 
Gilbert Warrenton 
Philip H. Whitman 
L. Guy Wilky 


MEMBERSHIP is by invitation only, each 
man being judged solely upon his record 
and ability as a cinematographer and his 
personal fitness as a man. 


Address: 

325 Markham Building, 
6372 Hollywood Blvd, 
Hollywood, California. 












MABEL CONDON 

M E. M. GIBSON 

Wp 

(tabmt lExrbattge 


PERSONAL REPRESENTATION 

ENGAGEMENTS 

PUBLICITY 

PLAYS 

LOS ANGELES ADDRESS NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVE 

PHONES I 

6035-37 HOLLYWOOD KIRMMSE, INC. 

HOLLY 3012, 577545 

CALIF. 51 WEST 37th ST. 


... 


Chester Bennett 
Earle 

Representation through 

THE MABEL CONDON EXCHANGE 


directing 

Williams 








IF YOU HAD YOUR OWN LABORATORY YOU’D 
SET THE SAME STANDARDS WE DO 

The best negative developing. The snappiest print. Reasonable prices. 

Quick Service. No Bunk 

Private cutting rooms. First-class projection. Your interests ours. 

Phone Holly 4015 


7520 


• 'iiitiiiitiiililiiilMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIHHIIIIIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIHtllllllHUIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIItlllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIHIIItllllllllll^^ 



H. TIPTON STECK 

Author and Continuity Expert 

Maurice Tourneur’s Production 
“THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY’’ 

Adaptation from the novel, “MARCENE” 
TITLING OF 

‘THE WHITE HEATHER” and “MY LADY’S GARTER” 

Mr. Tourneur's Latest Successes 


Screen Adaptations of 

“The Outcasts of Poker Flat” and “Jim of the Rangers 
Universal Specials Featuring HARR Y CAREY 
SOON TO BE RELEASED = 


|| “The Duke of Chimney Butte” “THE HILL MAN” 

I! Featuring 

FRED STONE universal 

Preparing “THE PEDDLER” featuring Monroe Salisbury 

JID DRESS: 

1741 N. CHEROKEE AVENUE, HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

i:=:=== ..... 


1 ^!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:^^ ....... . ....... . 














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Censorship 

The situation, state by state, with regard to this important problem—Detailed information rela¬ 
tive to the battles fought in various communities. 


“I firmly believe that censorship is today the most serious problem confronting the 
industry. It is a question which should receive the closest attention of all those interested 
to see this great and growing business reach tie point where it will be classed as the first of 
all of the industries of the world.”—Gabriel L. ( Hess, Chairman of the Censorship Committee 
)f the National Association. 


States in which bills proposing censorship were 
filed during past year: 

Alabama Missouri 


Nebraska 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Oklahoma 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 
W i sconsin 

as well as a special censorship bill filed with Board of 
Aldermen of New York City. 

Each of these proposed bills failed of passage. 


Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Illinois 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 


Delaware 

Benjamin Schwartz, Victoria Theater, Wilmington, 
state chairman. No censorship agitation at present. 

Florida 

Charles D. Cooley, Strand Amusement Co., Tampa, 
in charge of censorship matters in state. 

No antagonistic bills introduced during the last 
legislature. 

Georgia 

Two censorship bills introduced in the legislature. 
Arthur Lucas, district manager, Goldwyn. Atlanta, is 
conducting a campaign which bids fair to meet with 
success. 

Idaho 

Herman J. Brown, 27 Merino Bldg.. Boise, state 
chairman. No censorship bills introduced. 


Federal Censorship Killed 

In addition to these State measures Congressman 
Randall, Rep., California, introduced a bill in the 
House, No. 1477, providing for a Federal M. P. Com¬ 
mission. Referred to Judiciary Committee. Never re¬ 
ported out. Griffith killed this by lining up opposition 
among Randalls constituents in Los Angeles. 

Censorship Committee of National Association 
I). W. Griffith 
P. A. Powers, (Universal) 

Gabriel L. Hess, (Goldwyn) 

William A. Brady, Member ex-officio. 

Lewis Innerarity, (Pathe) 

Paul H. Cromelin, (Inter-Ocean) 

Arthur S. Friend, (Famous I’layers-Lasky) 

J. Robert Rubin, (Metro) 

Walter W. Irwin, (Famous Players-Lasky) 

Frederick H. Elliott, Secretary. 

SITUATION IN INDIVIDUAL STATES 

Alabama 

R. B. Wiley, Strand Amusement Co.. Montgomery, 
state chairman. The Alabama situation hinges directly 
on the outcome of the fight in Georgia. The National , 
Association believes that the results will be satis¬ 
factory. 

Arizona 

Through the activities of Albert G. Simms, attorney, 
Albuquerque, and James Carrigan, of Deming, N. M., 
the censorship bill failed of passage. 

There will be no censorship in Arizona during the 
next two years. 

California 

Drastic bill introduced. D. W. Griffith and Arthur 
Ryan took personal charge of the fight and were 
successful in preventing passage of the measure. 

Connecticut 

No censorship agitation during the past session of 
the legislature. 

Colorado 

Through the cooperation of the Rocky Mountain 
Screen Club, H. T. Nolan, Denver, president, the Fur¬ 
row censorship bill, was not reported by the House 
Committee. 

York. 

The committee failed to report out the bill. 


Illinois 

When the Buck censorship bill (Senate bill 77; 51st 
G. A., 1919) was introduced on Feb. 5, 1919, Aaron 
Jones of Jones, Linick A Schaefer was invited to lead 
in the work of organizing the opposition. Unable to 
continue the work. Jones later relinquished the chair¬ 
manship to Peter J. Schaefer. 

Lewis F. Jacobson lent invaluable aid to the com¬ 
mittee in a supervisory capacity. 

Dr. Samuel Atkinson was delegated to organize the 
field campaign and forcibly presented his arguments 
throughout the state and inaugurated a number of in¬ 
novations which met with instant success. LTnder his 
direction tens of thousands of special pamphlets were 
printed and placed in the hands of legislators and other 
prominent public officials where they would do the 
most good. Slides and trailers were run in hundreds of 
theaters. 

Miss Janet Priest took a keen interest in the fight 
and secured the valuable cooperation of the Better 
Photoplay League of America, of which she is executive 
secretary. 

Martin J. Quigley, editor of Exhibitors Herald, de¬ 
voted considerable time and energy to the campaign. 

Miss Rose Tapley, of Famous Players, made a tour 
through the state interviewing club women, special 
writers, etc. 

President William A. Brady of the National Asso¬ 
ciation, Paul H. Cromelin, Walter W. Irwin and Gabriel 
L. Hess, appeared before the commission on moving 
picture censorship in Chicago on March 28, 1919, to 
argue against the establsihment of a municipal board 
of censorship in Chicago. 

On May 20, Walter W. Irwin. Charles C Pettijohn 
and Frederick H. Elliott attended the hearing on the 
Buck bill before the House Judiciary committee at 
Springfield. 

The situation in Illinois was made doubly hard by 
the showing of two pictures—“Fit to Win” and “The 
End of the Road”-—in the theaters of Chicago during 
the hottest part of the fight. The proponents, of 
course, seized these pictures as concrete examples of 
why the state needed censorship, but their contentions 
in this regard were promptly met by proof that the 
censorship committee in New York had for weeks been 
supporting Commissioner of Licenses Gilchrist in his 
efforts to suppress these pictures in Greater New 







GUY EMPEY ^ 

IN A SERIES OF 

HIS OWN PRODUCTIONS 


































Indiana 

Representative Buchanan, of Indianapolis, introduced 
a censorship bill during the early part of the year. 
Immediate steps were taken to oppose the bill through 
Frank J. Rembush, national secretary of the M. P. E. 
of A., who secured the cooperation of the president of 
the State Women’s Clubs, exhibitors and the exchange 
managers. 

Owing to local conditions, it was not practicable to 
use trailers, slides or pamphlets. Results were obtained 
by conferences and meetings with leading public 
officials. C. C. Pettijohn, Exhibitors Mutual, played 
an important part in this work. 

The committee failed to report the bill. 

Iowa 

The censorship committee conducted the campaign 
through A. H. Blank, Garden Theater, Des Moines, 
state chairman. 

The legislative committee failed to report the bill. 

Kentucky 

Lee L. Goldberg, Rex Theater Bldg., Louisville, state 
chairman. 

No censorship legislation introduced. 

Louisiana 

No censorship legislation introduced. 

Maine 

Alfred S. Black, the Black Circuit, New England 
Theaters, Rockland, Me., state chairman. 

No attempts to introduce adverse legislation were 
made during the last session. The Maine legislature 
does not meet again until January, 1921. 

Massachusetts 

Ernest H. Horstman, Boston, and W. H. Jenner, 
manager of Goldwyn Exchange, Boston, did effective 
work in opposing House bill No. 1190. 

The bill failed of passage. 

Michigan 

The Tufts censorship bill (Senate bill 98) was intro¬ 
duced. 

John H. Kunsky, Madison Theater, Detroit, C. H. 
Seaman, Consolidated Theaters, Inc., Grand Rapids, 
J. E. Flynn, president Board of Motion Picture Ex¬ 
change Managers. Detroit, and George W. Trendle, 
Detroit, led the fight opposing the bill. The Minne¬ 
apolis Film Board of Trade also was in the fight. 

Although the bill succeeded in passing the Senate, 
the House Committee to which the bill was referred 
failed to report it out and the legislature adjourned. 

The Governor of the state called an extra session of 
the legislature and strongly urged the enactment of 
the Tufts censorship bill—making it necessary to again 
conduct a campaign in opposition. The extra session 
of the legislature failed to take any action, and the 
bill failed of passage. 

Minnesota 

A bill introduced by Senator Peterson and referred 
to the committee on general legislation. 

Theo. L. Hayes, New Garrick Theater, St. Paul, led 
the fight. A joint committee of 15 was organized, 
consisting of five from the Minneapolis Film Board of 
Trade, five from the Theatrical Protective League and 
five from the North Western M. P. Exhibitors Asso., 
with Hayes in direct charge. 

The Women’s Federated Clubs injected themselves 
into the situation and strongly urged the passage of 
the bill. Several public hearings were held where 
forceful arguments were presented. 

On March 20, the bill was recommended for in¬ 
definite postponement. 

Mississippi 

A. B. Cook, Jackson, Miss., state chairman. No 
censorship legislation introduced. 

Montana 

E. M. Taylor, Ansonia Theater, Butte, state chair¬ 
man. No censorship legislation introduced. 


Missouri 

The fight iu Missouri was led by Hector M. E. 
Pasmezoglu, president of the Congress Amusement Co. 

A systematic campaign was conducted against House 
bill No. 327, introduced by Representative Ferguson 
and Hackett, and Senate bill No. 282, introduced by 
Senators Cunningham and Gray. 

Circulars and bulletins were sent to all exhibitors. 
A large number of pamphlets and slides were furnished 
by the National Association. The entire state was 
covered by means of a series of sub-committees. 

A flood of personal appeals poured in on the mem¬ 
bers of both houses. 

The Exchange Managers Association of St. Louis co¬ 
operated. H. M. Thomas, Rialto Theater, Omaha, Neb., 
offered valuable suggestions which had been success¬ 
fully used in the campaign in his state. 

An interesting feature of the fight was the intro¬ 
duction by the proponents of the bill of “cutouts” 
ordered by the Pennsylvania Board of Censors. The 
injustice of this was proven by Pasmezoglu. 

Both committees failed to report the bills. 

Nevada 

Dale Hurst, Grand Theater, Reno, state chairman. 
No censorship bills introduced. 

Nebraska 

House bill No. 355 introduced by Representative J. 
Reid Green. H. M. Thomas, Strand Amusement Co., 
Omaha, Neb., led the fight. 

Thomas Immediately conferred with members of the 
Exchange censorship committee and devised a system 
for procuring petitions by theater patrons; arranged 
for speakers to explain the evils of the proposed bill; 
slides were shown, and an intensive newspaper cam¬ 
paign inaugurated. 

There is but one large town in the State—Omaha. 
The result is a large number of farmer legislators who 
are opposed to all kinds of amusements on general 
principles. Coupled with the fact that the women’s 
clubs of the state were behind the bill, it was immedi¬ 
ately evident that the censorship committee had diffi¬ 
cult opposition to overcome. 

During the fight the Nebraska Federated Women’s 
Clubs published a statement to the effect that the 
National Board of Review was controlled by motion 
picture producers. This statement was branded as 
unqualifiedly false and served as an opportunity for 
W. D. McGuire, Executive Secretary of the Board, to 
clarify the mind of the public on the aims and pur¬ 
poses of his organization. 

The C. L. U., Omaha Chamber of Commerce, Clear¬ 
ing House Asso., Retailers’ Asso., Manufacturers’ Asso. 
and Hotel Men’s Asso. cooperated. 

The bill was killed, 62 to 20. 

New Hampshire 

State chairman C. H. Bean, president of the M. P. 
Exhibitors League of New Hampshire, has conducted 
a campaign of education to offset the propaganda work 
of the reform element. 

Pamphlets were widely distributed in Manchester, 
Concord and several other local points. No censorship 
bills have been introduced in the state. 

New Jersey 

Dr. Charles Hespe, 388 Central Ave., Jersey City, 
and Louis F. Blumenthal, of the Exhibitors’ Trade 
Review, led the fight in opposing the censorship bill. 

The bill introduced was not reported out of com¬ 
mittee. 

New York 

Slacer bill, No. 1088, introduced on March 6, passed 
the Assembly and was referred to the Judiciary com¬ 
mittee, but through the efforts of Senator James J. 
Walker was withdrawn from committee and returned 
to the general calendar, where it remained until the 
adjournment of the legislature. 

In connection with the censorship situation in this 
state the New York State Conference of Mayors has 




WILFRID NORTH 

DIRECTOR 

GUY EMPEy PRODUCTIONS 
























adopted resolutions providing for the appointment of a 
committee to investigate censorship matters in a gen¬ 
eral way. In response to a request from William P. 
Capes, Secretary of the conference, the executive com¬ 
mittee of the Natl. Asso. has designated the following 
to represent the industry on the committee: 

Walter W. Irwin, representing the Producers Di¬ 
vision. 

Gabriel L. Hess, representing the Distributors 
Division. 

J. F. Brulatour, representing the Supply and Equip¬ 
ment Division. 

Sydney S. Cohen, representing the New York State 
Exhibitors. 

New York City 

One of the most striking victories of the year was 
won in the City of New York. An ordinance was in¬ 
troduced in the Board of Aldermen by Augustus M. 
Wise on April 22. 

A public hearing was held a the City Hall which 
was attended by Walter W. Irwin, J. Robert Rubin. 
Paul H. Cromelin, Frederick H. Elliott, Ralph Folks, 
Dr. Everett D. Martin, W. D. McGuire, Jr., James P. 
Holland, Mrs. Grace Humiston, Gabriel L. Hess, and 
many others, who presented the answer of the industry 
to the attempt to saddle censorship upon the city of 
New York. 

On June 10. the Committee on General Welfare 
unanimously accepted the report of its chairman. Aider- 
man William T. Collins, condemning the bill. 

North Carolina 

The fight, against the censorship bill introduced in 
the General Assembly of North Carolina was conducted 
through H. B. Varner secretary and treasurer of the 
M. P. E. Asso., Eyrie Theater, Lexington, N. C. 

The Assembly ended in March and the bill auto¬ 
matically died. 

North Dakota 

Under the direct supervision of the Minneapolis Film 
Board of Trade the censorship bill was defeated during 
the early part of the session. 

Ohio 

Every reel of film of whatever nature, intended for 
public exhibition in Ohio, must first be submitted to 
the Ohio Board of Censors, and be approved by it 
before it may be exhibited publicly. The Board charges 
one dollar per reel of a thousand feet or less, for 
pictures screened in its projection room, and the same 
charge is made for duplicate prints. A five-foot leader 
of approval is issued for each print, the eost of which 
is included in the fee for censorship. This leader 
must be attached to the film in advance of the title 
and must appear upon the screen at every showing of 
the picture. Failure to observe the orders of the Board 
carry penalties of fine and imprisonment. 

Films may be shipped to the Board either by Parcel 
Post or express in packages approved by the postal 
authorities or the Interstate Commerce Commission. 
When shipped by express all charges must be “Pre¬ 
paid.” 

All shipments whether by mail or express must be 
accompanied by checks made payable to “The Treasurer 
of State of Ohio” for the censorship fee. 

Pennsylvania 

At the eleventh hour of the last session of the 
legislature a bill was enacted requiring the distributors 
of the motion pictures within the commonwealth to 
file a bond with the State Board of Censors in double 
the amount of deposits received from exhibitors in the 
state; also licensing of all films shown in the state. 

The Stanley Co. of Philadelphia, James B. Clark, 
President of the Rowland & Clark Theaters, Pitts¬ 
burgh, Mayor Babcock of Pittsburgh, and State Senator 
Leslie led the fight. 

Governor Sproul vetoed the bill. 


Rhode Island 

Charles H. Williams, manager of the Strand, Provi¬ 
dence, state chairman. 

No antagonistic bills have been presented and none 
is contemplated at the present time. 

South Carolina 

H. B. Varner,, conducted the fight against the censor¬ 
ship bill introduced. 

The bill died in committee. 

Tennessee 

Charles A. MacElravey, Majestic Amusement Co., 
Memphis, Tenn., state chairman of the censorship com¬ 
mittee, was successful in conducting a campaign pre¬ 
venting the passage of bill introduced in the legislature 
of that state. 

Vermont 

E. R. Hutchinson, Burlington, Vt., state chairman. 
No antagonistic legislation introduced. The legislature 
does not meet again until January, 1921. 

Washington 

No censorship legislation was introduced. 

L. O. Lukan. president of the Northwest Film Board 
of Trade, state chairman. 

Washington, D. C. 

II. M. Crandall, 934 F. St., N.W.. Washington, D. C., 
chairman' for the District of Columbia. He works in 
conjunction with R. B. Smeltzer and Oscar S. Morgan, 
president and secretary, respectively, of the Exchange 
Managers’ Association, and the National Association’s 
Washington representative. 

Wisconsin 

On March 13th. 1919, a decidedly vicious bill 

(551 -A) was introduced into the lower house by As¬ 
semblyman George Oakes of St. Croix County. It was 
referred to the committee on state affairs. 

Ralph W. Jackman, and F. J. McWilliams, Grand 
Theater, Madison, were appointed to conduct the oppo¬ 
sition. 

The exhibitors throughout the state were mobilized 
and gave a good account of themselves in a stirring 
campaign. Again the value of circulating petitions, 
slides and trailers, the use of Four Minute Men, an¬ 
nouncements in programs, and extensive newspaper 
advertising was proven. The women’s clubs of the 
state were well organized in favor of the bill but 
could not refute the strong arguments presented 
against its passage. 

A hearing was held May 1; on May 2 the bill was 
recommended for indefinite postponement. 

Fight Aeainst Salacious Pictures 

In practically every campaign, notably in Illinois, 
the proponents of censorship bills have come forward 
with 'several pictures of questionable character and 
offered them as their main argument in 'favor of 
censorship. 

Your committee has devoted much time and effort 
to two pictures—“Fit to Win” and “The End of the 
Road.” which were produced originally for exclusive 
exhibition in army cantonments, and later, in some 
unexplained manner, fell into the hands of private indi¬ 
viduals. These pictures are now being shown, as a 
commercial proposition, to mixed audiences throughout 
the country. The result is that the indignation of the 
public against these films has caused the entire motion 
picture industry to suffer. 

■ Commissioner of Licenses John F. Gilchrist, New 
York City, made a test case of “Fit to Win” by revok¬ 
ing the license of the Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, 
where the picture was on exhibition. The owner of the 
film, however, backed by the Public Health Service of 
the United States, secured an injunction restraining 
the Commissioner from Interfering with the picture, 
which was vacated and the exhibition of the picture 
prohibited. The bwner of the picture then made 
application for the same relief to the United States 
Courts, and notwithstanding a decision in the lower 



■ 


FLORENCE EVELYN MdRTIN 

LEADING WOMAN 

GUY EMPEy PRODUCTIONS 




©underwood c unoerwooo 















State Regulations 

Brief but important data regarding existing statutes in force throughout this country. 


Alabama 

No state legislation. Local ordinances cover build¬ 
ing and projection. 

Arizona 

No state laws governing industry. 

California 

State legislation covering many points especially 
with reference to contracts. Involved and intricate 
legislation affects a number of important matters. 
Special building and projection statutes in various 
cities. 

Colorado 

No state laws regulating pictures. Blue law exists 
but has never been enforced regarding Sunday shows. 

Connecticut 

Local ordinances only. Last legislature enacted law 
which prohibits the carrying of film in street or rail¬ 
way cars where passengers are carried. 

Delaware 

Local regulations only relative to projection and 
building. 

Idaho 

No general laws. Sunday shows matter of local 
option. Local ordinances cover projection and build¬ 
ing. No censorship or shipping regulations in force. 

Kentucky 

Has no state law pertaining to motion pictures with 
exceptions of rules enforced by state fire marshal. 
State, law regarded as dead regards Sunday closing. 
Individual cities act as censors. No state law govern¬ 
ing shipping. 

Kansas 

State Board of- Review acts as censor. This depart¬ 
ment, however, has nothing to do with shipping or 
Sunday closing regulations. Local ordinances govern 
building and projection regulations. 

Massachusetts 

Building and projection ordinances. Local authori¬ 
ties censor. 

Minnesota 

State regulations relative to projection and building 
plans.. All film must be shipped in standard metal 
containers. 

Michigan 

New laws effective relative to showings for religious, 
mechanical and scientific purposes effective Aug. 14. 
State laws relative to projection only. Shipping in 
standard metal cases. 

Missouri 

No regulations other than projection and building 
laws. 

No regulations, save local ordinances covering build¬ 
ing and projection. No censorship or Sunday laws. 

Maryland 

State censor body in existence. No shipping regu¬ 
lations. Local ordinances cover building and projec¬ 
tion regulations. 

Maine 

Revised statutes, 1916, Chapter 32, sections 14 to 
18 cover all special picture legislation save for special 
statutes affecting projection. No Sunday shows per¬ 
mitted. Local censorship in effect at various points. 
No shipping regulations. 

New Hampshire 

Special statute regarding shipping. Local ordi¬ 
nances otherwise cover save that general laws re¬ 
garding theatrical shows also govern pictures. But 
these have never been invoked. 


North Dakota 

Local regulations apply to building and projection. 
No shipping laws. 

North Carolina 

Local ordinances only covering building and projec¬ 
tion. No state law relative to shipping. 

New York 

Local ordinances only relative to building, and pro¬ 
jection. No state law relative to shipping but stand¬ 
ard metal cases usually employed. New York city fire 
department insisting on all film being carried in street 
cars in metal containers. Last legislature passed law 
allowing cities and towns to have local option as to 
Sunday shows. 

New Mexico 

No state regulations. City ordinances and special 
laws only. 

Nevada 

No regulations. 

Nebraska 

State regulations relative to projection and exits. 
All film must be shipped in standard metal containers. 

Oregon 

No general laws regarding pictures. Local statutes 
cover building, projection and censorship. 

Ohio 

State law relative to projection and building. 

Pennsylvania 

Censor hrws and board. Local ordinances regarding 
building and projection. 

Rhode Island 

Building regulations under local ordinances. State 
law relative to projection. No shipping regulations. 

South Dakota 

No state ordinances, but local regulations for building 
and projection. State law prevents any labor on Sun¬ 
day but does not affect exhibition generally. 

South Carolina 

No state regulations. Local ordinances affect pro¬ 
jection and building, especially exits. 

Tennessee 

No state regulations, but local ordinances cover build¬ 
ing and projection. Standard shipping cases de¬ 
manded. 

Texas 

Local ordinances cover projection and building. No 
shipping regulations. 

Utah 

No state regulations save projection and exits. Local 
ordinances chiefly cover these points. 

Vermont 

State regulations protect shipping and prohibit Sun¬ 
day shows. Select men of cities and towns, however, 
decide on Sunday showings. Local ordinances for 
building and projection. 

Virginia 

Local regulations relative to buildings, exits, projec¬ 
tion, only. Standard metal cases usually used for ship¬ 
ping. No state laws. 

Washington 

No state laws. Olympia and other cities have local 
ordinances chiefly concerning projection. No state 
laws regarding shipping. 

Wyoming 

No state regulations relative to shipping. Local 
authorities handle building and projection regulations. 

Wisconsin 

State regulations pertaining to projection. Local 
ordinances cover building. No shipping laws. 



Emile Chautard 

Director 

EMILE CHAUTARD PHOTO PLAY NOVELS 
MAYFLOWER PHOTO PLAY CORPORATION 


STARS 


Elsie Ferguson 
Clara Kimball Young 
Vivian Martin 
Holbrook Blinn 
Gail Kane 
Jeanne Eagle 
Montagt Love 


Pauline Frederick 
Alice Brady 
Robert Warwick 
Doris Kenyon 
Emile Poline 
Francis Nelson 
Frederick Warde 












Incorporations of the Year 


NEW YORK 


Beenell Film Distributing Corp. $3,000 

A & S Producing Corp. 3,000 

Althos Amusement Co. 3.000 

Chatham Pictures Corp. 15,000 

Volk Film Co. 1,000 

W'llinm Fox Photoplay Co. 10,000 

William Fox Play Co. 10,000 

Montague Amusement Co. 15,000 

Lnjeunesse Corp. 500 

Winning the War, Inc. 500 

Ferfoul Film Co. 25.000 

Sclent Mystery Corp. 10.000 

Shea Kinsilia Players, Inc. 4.000 

Liberty Exchange, Inc. 10.000 

Zane Grey Pictures, Inc. 50.000 

• Tower Film Corp. 5.000 

P’ctures Finance Corp. 50 000 

Independent Sales Corp. 50.000 

Humanity Producing Corp. 10.000 

Keith & Heagney, Inc. 10.000 

MacManus Corp. 100.000 

Frank Keenan Prod. 10.000 

American Cinema Corp. 100.000 

Bulls Eye Film Corp. 5.000 

Wibrics Amusements Construction Co. 10 000 

Magnet Productions . 2.000 

Lynn Film Co., Inc. 10.000 

Virginia Pearson Photoplays, Inc. 130.000 

Goldpress Amusement Co. 3,000 

Loew’s Central Theaters Corp. 30,000 

Hendrix Holding Corp. 5,000 

Brooklyn Arena Corp. 1,000 

Community Motion Picture Bureau. 5,000 

Steinway Avenue Theater Co. 75,000 

Gold Coin Motion Picture Co. 100.000 

Juno Amusement Co. 3,000 

Acme Picture Corp. 50,000 

Yoost Photoplay Theater Co. 10,000 

Standard Filmprint Corp. 15,000 

Baltimore State Rights Film Co. 5,000 

O. & R. Enterprises. 5,000 

Goldleo Corp. 5,000 

Belnord Amusement Co. 1,000 

Great Authors Pictures, Inc. 50,000 

35 Second Ave. Amusement Co. 1,000 

Grey Seal Prod.$25,000; increased to 50,000 

Peacock Feature Film Exchange. 25,000 

Mazda Amusement Corp. 12,000 

B. W. & K. Amusement Co. 0,000 

Schomer-Ross Prod., Inc. • . 50,000 

Regia Art Film Co. 5,000 

Apollo Trading Corp. 100,000 

Ridge Amusement Corp. 500 

Novograph Film Corp. 25,000 

Eston Productions, Inc. 40,000 

Rialto Theater Corp. 

Greenwich Operating Co. 1,000 

Liberty Prod. Corp. 30,000 

Breed Howell Film Corp. 10,000 

Ellen Terry Theater Corp. 5,000 

Exhibitors Mutual Distributing Corp. 

Edgar Lewis, Inc. 1,000 

Miserole Amusement Corp. 5,000 

Arctic Film Corp. 100,000 

M. D. G. Amusement Co. 10,000 

Far Rockaway Strand Theater Co. 105,000 

C. H. Amusement Corp. 25,000 

Rio Productions, Inc. 50,000 

Atlantic Cinema Corp. 10,000 

George V. Hobart Co. 50,000 

Almazov Film Laboratories, Inc.. 20,000 

Marilynn Amusement Co. 3,000 

Standard Cinemachinery Mfg. Co. 1,000,000 


Tyrad Pictures, Inc. $10,000 

Top Amusement Co. 40,000» 

Rapf Productions, Inc. 50,000 

Di Salvo Brothers, Inc. 100,00(1 

Brooklyn Theaters Supply Co. 10,000 

Forest Hills Community Hall of Forest Hills 2,100 

Beleva Theatrical Corp. 50,000 

Briggs Pictures, Inc. 500 

S. & H. Amusement Corp. 5,000 

Pleasureland Amusement Co. 5,000 

Better Service Film Co. 25,000 

Daniels Studios, Inc. 30,000 

Oliver Films, Inc. 500 

British American Pictures Finance Corp... 20.000 

Brandt Amusement Co. 2,500 

G. & A. Amusement Co. 0 oo<i 

Dexter Amusement Co. 1.000 

Hal Benedict Studios, Inc.. ' ' loioOO 

McDon Pictures Corp.* . ’ * . 10,000* 

Alys Theater Corp. LOO(V 

Film Finance Corp.' ' * ' 500.000 

Ay won Film Corp. 50 000 

Warburton Players, Inc.5^000 

Victor Photoplay Corp. lo!oOO 

The Papa, Inc. 10 000 

Liberty Sq. Theat. Co. 3^000 

Albany Strand Theater Co. 115,000 

Argonne M. P. Co. ’500 

Wilson Theater, Inc. 500 

Burton George Prod. 50,000 

Parboro Corp. 5,000 

Cameo Exxhibition Corp. 5,000 

Clermont Movie Corp. 10,000 

Ray Emory Prod.. . .10^000 

Kramer & Rabinovitch, Inc.. 10,000 

Seligraph Co. 2^000 

Tatra Productions Corp. 30^000 

Colorcraft Corp. 10,000 

Gem Films, Inc. 50^000 

Film Special, Inc. 50,000 

Parkway Holding Corp. 15'o00 

Countess Floria Film Corp. 75^000 

Jester Films, Inc. 50^000 

Dooley Exchange, Inc. 160^000 

S. L. K. Serial Corp. 25,000 

Valentine Theater Corp. 35,000 

Superior Slide Service. 5,000 

It’s Up to You Co. 10,000 

Neptune Screen Development Co. 50,000 

Sunapee Film Corp. 100,000 

Charlton Hotel Corp.■. 500 

Photoplay Serials Corp. 5,000 

Superior Amusements, Inc. 1,000 

Washington Motion Picture Corp. 25,000 

Lux Products Corp. 350,000 

Walter Hast, Inc. 50,000 

Broda & Meyer, Inc. 10,000 

Burston Films, Inc. 10,000 

Film Investing Corp. 100^000 

And All the King’s Horses Corp. 50,000 

Modern Comedies, Inc. 25,000 

Jaybee Amusement Co. 5,000 

Allied Theaters, Inc. 20,000 

Hy-Art Film Corp. 100,000 

Luck Production Co. 5,000 

Projection Optics Co. 5,000 

Triar Amusement Co. 10,000 

Associated Players, Inc. 5,000 

Grossmith Production Co. 100,000 

Film-Clas Corp. 50,000 

Roebling Amusement Co. 5,000 

K. & P. Amusement Co. 5,000 

Solitary Sin Corp. 50,000 

Wm. Morris Enterprises, Inc. 5,000 






















































































































































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Robert Z. Leonard 


‘jDirector 


ii 

5l 


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... 


JOHN AKNOLD 


CAMEKAMAN 


Five Years 
With Metro 


Member American 
Society Cinematographers 


METRO STUDIOS, HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 


ffHIIIIIIIIUIIIII 



















Leavitt Deep Sea Salvage Co. $100,000 

Tree Film Co. 5.000 

F. S. Productions. 25.000 

Beverly Amusement Corp. 150.000 

Aeehanam Theater Co..... . 10.000 

Edgar Dudley, Inc. 25.000 

Nicholas Kessel Laboratories. Inc. 25.000 

Thanhouser Laboratory, Inc. 200.000 

New Atlantic Gardens. 9.000 

White Heather Amusement Corp. 500 

Reel of Knowledge, Inc. 50.000 

Ex-Kay Photo Co. 10.000 

Tiger Film Corp. 25,000 

Advance Theatrical Enterprises, Inc. 5,000 

Screen Letter Box. . 

Canyon Pictures Corp. 10,000 

Burtis Grand Theater Co. 10.000 

Will Morrissey Producing Co. 50.000 

Prevoost Amusement Co. 60.000 

J. Stuart Blackton Feature Pictures, Inc. . . 1,000.000 

Shurter Theater Co. 30.000 

Popular Prod., Inc. 200.000 

Solar Film Corp. 25,000 

Edythe Hope Film Corp. 100,000 

Arthur F. Beck Serial Prod. 100,000 

Edgar Jones Prod. 30.000 

Bray Pictures Corp. 1,500.000 

Hermes Amusement Co. 3.000 

Life-Grams, Inc. 5,000 

Schenectady Strand Theater, Inc. 400.000 

Long Island Motion Picture Co. 75,000 

Edwin E. Kohn, Inc.. 600 

Oliver Production Co. 300,000 

Distributors Film Syndicate. 50.000 

Maddock Enterprises, Inc. 20.000 

Old Plays and Players, Inc. 50,000 

Famous Playwrights, Inc. 1,000,000 

Truart Pictures, Inc. 36,000 

C. R. M. Amusement Corp. 10,000 

South Park Amusement Co. . 

Step-in, Inc. 50,000 

Walter F. Wenger Dramatic Enterprises. . . 10.000 

Berico Producing Corp. 10.000 

Screen Entertainment Distributors. 100,000 

Kormak Mfg. Co. 1.000 

Georgette Georgin Film Co. 50.000 

United Projector Co. 50,000 

Midnight Amusement Co. 3,000 

Coronet Exhibition Corp. .. 5,000 

Hallmark Pictures Corp. 50,000 

A. Bannon Co. 10,000 

Blazed Trail Prod. 10,000 

Pan-Continental Film Distributors. 500,000 

Scientific Film Corp. 6,000 

Community Prod., Inc. 250,000 

Automatic Film Development Corp. 10,000 

Fleur de Lys Films, Inc. 18,900 

Kinaesthetic Arts, Inc. 5,000 

Normandy Theater . 125,000 

Eighty-first St. Theater Corp. 225,000 

Mighty Manufacturing Co. 50,000 

Gates Theater Corp. 250,000 

Foundation Film Corp. 105,000 

Speir-Lenigan . 5,000 

Artclass Pictures Corp. 50,000 

Broadway Slide Co. 5,000 

Beck Enterprises, Inc. 50.000 

Clock Theater Co. 10,000 

Capital Film Exchange. 25,000 

Armenia Film Co. 100,000 

Hal Clements Photo Features. 150,000 

Arthur H. Jacobs, Inc. 2,500 

Belmont Bungalow Co. 10,000 

Sheepshead Bay Bldg. Co. 10,000 

Taylors Productions, Inc. 5,000 

Radiosoril Films . 100,000 


Planet Films Corp. 

Cinema Trading Co. 

K. & L. Theatrical Enterprises, Inc. 

Hargood Holding Corp.. 

Filmart Laboratories . 

Guy Crosswell Smith, Ltd. 

L. H. Prod. Corp. 

Aremby Film Corp. 

Hertel Theater Corp. 

1286 Bedford Ave. Corp. 

Victoria Theater Corp. 

Moving Picture Titles. 

Arcadian Film Corp. 

Arial Amusement Co. 

Elite Film Assn., Inc. 

L’ Star Laboratory. 

Oscar Hammerstein’s Grand Opera Co. 

Dalton Enterprises Co. 

Diamond Amusement Corp. 

Bergman-Nayan Studio . 

Forward Film Distributors. 

S. T. M. Lab., Inc. 

Portsmouth Film Corp. 

Essarell Amusement Corp. 

Octagon Films . 

Selig Enterprises, Inc. 

I. -D. Amusement Corp.. 

Ackerman Film Prod... 

Medal Film Co. 

J. M. W. Co. 

Joseph Friedberg, Inc. 

William St. Amusement Co. 

Federal Photoplays, Inc. 

Mocar Motion Picture Corp. 

Reserve Film Corp. of Manhattan..• 

Big Two Amusement Corp. 

Wonders of rlie World, Inc. 

Silfo Amusement Co.. 

W. M. Productions, Inc. 

R. M. W. Corp. 

Noble Amusement Co. f . . 

Quebec Amusement Co. 

Clarendon Productions .. . . 

NEW JERSEY CORPORATIONS 

Producers Distributing Corp. 

Plymouth Film Co. 

A. D. F. Amusement Co. 

Bangor Opera House. 

National Commercial and Amusement Co. . . 

Jans Distributing Corp.f. . . . 

Fabian, Zueker, Steiner Co.. . . 

Three Star Amusement Corp. 

Widescope Camera Co. 

Liberty Theater Co. 

Creston Feature Pictures, Inc. 

Paramount-Essex Theaters Co. 

Amboy Theater Co. 


DELAWARE CORPORATIONS 

Intercity Photoplay Corp. 

National Operating Corp. 

Van Kirk Holding Co . 

Exhibitors Booking Corp. of Cen. W. States.. 
Exhibitors Booking Corp. of Central States.. 
Exhibitors Booking Corp. of N. E. States. . 

Cardinal Films, Inc. 

Democracy Photoplay Co. 

Feature Pictures Corp. 

Triangle Trading Corp... 

Victoria Photoplay Production Co. 

Woodland Amusement Co. 

American Amusement & Theatrical Co., Inc. 

Ginns Theater Co. 

Ideal Amusement Co. 

Majestic Amusement Enterprises, Inc. 




$15,000 

20,000 

5,000 

5,000 

300,000 

150,000 

150,000 

10.000 

100.000 

10 , 000 > 

195,000 

15,000 

25,000 

8,000 

50,000 

3.000 

20.000 

60.000 

50,000 

10.000 

50.000 

5,000 

2.500 

1.500 
300,000 

2.500 
5,000 

50.000 

50,000 

10,000 

10,000 

6.000 

50,000 

25,000 

500 

5,000 

25,000 

5.000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 


95,000 


500.000 

30.000 

2.000 

100.000 

125,000 


300,000 

25,000 

125 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

13,800 


50,000 
2,000 
500,000 
8,000 
8,000 
. 48,000 
25,000 
1,000,000 
500,000 
100,000 
75,000 
2,000 
100,000 
50,000 
2,000 
500,000 





















































































































































CORPORATION 

CALIFORNIA 

DORMAN 


CATHRINE 


t. connet 


£ M. TAYLOR 

PRESIDENT 


CATHR/NE CURTIS 

president 


\RD OF DIRECTORS 

ALBERT L.JUDSON 

' e.r.pirtef 

kR THUR E SPALDING 

r.rORGE d. WHALEN 


REESE LLEWELLYN 

COLM MIL ELL AN 
GE M- TAYLOR 


JEW YORK OFFICE 
120 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 


INTRODUCING 

CATHRINE cu 

SCREEN INTERPM 



Supreme Pictures, Inc.$1,000,000 

Yorska Photoplay Corp. 100.000 

Burton King Pictures Corp. 250,000 

Colonial Theater Co. of Boston. 3,000 

Creston Feature Pictures, Inc. 100,000 

Guy Empey Pictures Corp. 1,000,000 

Gem Amusement Co. 2,000 

Hamilton Theaters Corp. 500,000 

Missouri Theater Co. 400,000 

United Artists Corp. 1,400,000 

American Camerascope Corp. 500,000 

Automatic Reel Co. 100,000 

Creation Films, Inc. 500,000 

Electric Films Corp. 2,000 

Eminent Authors Pictures, Inc. 1,000,000 

Famous Attractions, Inc. 350,000 

Metro Realty Co. 10,000 

Preferred Pictures Corp. 1,000,000 

United Picture Productions Corp. 6,000,000 

Thrill Exploiting Co. 200,000 

Realart Pictures Corp. 1,000,000 

Victory Feature Film Co. 1,000,000 

Walbridge Park Coliseum Co. 18,000 

Adams Theaters Co . 300,000 

American Talking Picture & Talking Ma¬ 
chine Corp.(Re-Instatement) 

Cinema Art Prod., Inc. 1,500,000 

Delmart Films, Inc. 150,000 

Interstate Amusement Co. 5,000 

Mitchell Lewis Prod., Inc. 100,000 

Niles Welch Prod., Inc. 100,000 

Philadelphia Winter Garden Amusement Co. 15,000 

Stanley Co. of America.15,000,000 

Syd Chaplin Aircraft Corp. 250,000 

Seena Owen Prod., Inc. 100,000 

Talking Motion Pictures, Inc. 1,050,000 

United States Photo Play Corp. 2,000,000 

United Amusements, Inc. 15,000 

West End Amusement Co. 100,000 

Armenia Film Co., Inc. 100,000 

American Film Co., Inc.15,000,000 

All-American Film Service, Inc. 200,000 

Claymount Enterprises, Inc. 99,000 

Crusader Films, Inc. 100,000 

Equity Pictures Corp. 500,000 

Graphilm Motion Picture Corp. 50,000 

International Enterprises, Inc. 50,000 

International Attractions, Inc. 50,000 

John Cort, Inc.(Reinstatement) 

Loew’s Ohio Theaters, Inc. 8,000,000 

Motion Picture and Theatrical Cooperative 

Association of the World, Inc. 1,000,000 

Motion Picture Producing Co. of America. . 500,000 

Old Plays and Players, Inc. 50,000 

Syd Chaplin Air Line Corp. 100,000 

Sun Films, Inc. 100,000 

United Products Corp. of America. 100,000 

Perry Amusement Co. 5,000 

Burton Holmes Travelogue Bureau, Inc.... 100,000 

Glass-Slides Moving Picture Machines Corp. 2,000,000 

Leslie Players Corp. 100,000 

Movie Sales and Manufacturing Co. 1,000,000 

Novelty Amusement Co. 480,000 

Stanley Booking Co.5,010,000 

Aquila Film Corp. 250,000 

Cameragraph Co. 2,500,000 

King Theater Co. 200,000 

Lenskraft Pictures Corp. 1,000,000 

Apex Pictures. 20,000 

Belmar Super-Film Features, Inc. 35,000 

Colonial Theater Co. of Providence. 3,000 

Dempsey Corp. 100,000 

Donald B. Howard Heater Co. 450,000 

Graphoscope Service Co. of Washington... 100,000 

Grove Amusement Co. 30,000 

Independent Theaters and Vaudeville Circuit, 

Inc. 250,000 


Quaker City Amusement Co. $2,000 

Graphoscope Development Co. 

Pilgrim Co. 80,000 

Winsome Stars Corp. 50,000 

Leslie Players Corp. 100.000 

International Church Film Corp. 1,250,000 

Strand Amusement Co. 20,000 

Profound Pictxxres Corp. 1,000,000 

American Camerascope Corp. 500,000 

Hayward-Majestic Motion Picture Corp... 1,000,000 

Reliant Pictures Corp. 1,000,000 

Dunbar Amusement Co. 25,000 

Shamrock M. P. Corp. 500,000 

Great Western Pictures Corp. 100,000 

Stereoptican Products, Inc. 100,000 

Euclid, 102 Theater Co. 500,000 

Photoscope of New York. 1,000,000 

CALIFORNIA CORPORATIONS 

Brentwood Film Co. 50,000 

Pacific Coast Film Co. 50.000 

Rialto Theater Co. 100,000 

Motive Motion Picture Corp. 200.000 

Standard Film Co. 20,000 

Am-Erin Film Co. 50.000 

American Society of Cinematographers.... No Capital 

Democracy Film Co. 50,000 

San Francisco Film Exchange Board of Trade, 

No Capital 

Pacific Photo Products Co. 20,000 

Selznick Pictures Corp., 2,500 shares.... No par value 

Cleo Madison Feature Film Co. 50,000 

National Motion Picture Camera Co. 10,000 

American Theater Co. 10,000 

Katherin MacDonald Pictures Corp. 25,000 

Hermann Film Corp. 75,000 

Swastika Films Corp. 100,000 

Staton Western Film Corp. 50^000 

Frazee Film Prod., Inc. 200.000 

Oregon Hippodrome Co. 10,000 

Wilson Theater System. 250,*000 

Federal Photo Plays of California. 50,000 

Circle C Film Co. 75,000 

Actors’ Association of Los Angeles.No Capital 

Mitchell Lewis Prod. Co. 200,000 

Premier Picture Co. 75'000 

Ogla Grey Zacsek Film Corp. 50^000 

Novograph Film Corp. 25.000 

Science Film Corp. 200,000 

Macauley Master Photo Plays. 25*000 

Cheeswright Studios, Inc. 25,000 

Clancy Super-play Corp. 200,000 

Catalina Submarine Film Co. 50,000 

Theater Arts Alliance .No Capital 

San Francisco Studios. 500,000 

Paton Films, Inc. 100,000 

Alkirs Photo Play Co. 25,000 

Latina Prod. 100,000 

Cosmos Pictures Corp. 350,000 

Garson Studios, Inc. 100,000 

Turlock Theater Co. 100,000 

Pacific Theater and Realty Co. 25,000 

Calimade Pictux-es . 25,000 

Blue Star Axuusement Co. 100,000 

Diana Motion Pictures. 200,000 

Fine Arts Film Corp. 1,000 

Golden Days Picture Plays, Inc. 50,000 

Pasadena Theater Co. 150,000 

Haworth Studios . 250,000 

Excelsis Film Corp., of Los Angeles. 500,000 

Western Film Coi-p. 50,000 

Annette Kellerman Educational Pictures.... 25,000 

Beaux-Art Features Co. 50,000 

Fraser Motion Picture Syndicate.$ 250,000 

Virginia Harris Photoplay Co. 50,000 

Paul Studios, Inc. 2,500,000 















































































































































NN0UNGEMENT 


EDWIN CAREWE’S 

FORMATION OF HIS OWN MOTION 
PICTURE PRODUCING COMPANY— 
TO PRODUCE A SERIES OF MERIT 
PRODUCTIONS FOR RELEASE BY 
PATFIE EXCHANGE INCORPORATED. 


EDWIN CAREWE PRODUCTIONS 

INCORPORATED 

1457 BROADWAY Bryant 6325 NEW YORK CITY 




































































































The Foreign Outlook 

Expert ideas on this, the most important problem to American producers—Opportunities in for¬ 
eign fields opening—Some difficulties to be overcome. 


T^HERE will be more American films shown in 
the foreign countries than ever before now 
that the field is open for the producers on this 
side. David P. Howells who handles the First 
National and United Pictures for the entire w6rld 
outside of United States, and controls Metro and 
Selznick for the Orient, says: 

“During the war the European countries were 
flooded with American made films. There were 
none other available, the European producers 
were not in a position to offer competition. This 
does not alter the fact that American films are 
popular. The European play-goer demands that 
a majority of the program be made up of Ameri¬ 
can films. The future of the American produc¬ 
tion in foreign market is assured. 

“The time is passed when a distributor can buy 
the foreign rights for a production and then sell 
it to a European agent for circulation and let the 
matter drop. The distributor must make a judi¬ 
cious, selection of all films bought for the foreign 
market for foreign buyers have been “stung” so 
much in the past that are always wary of the 
distributor who sells them one bad picture. 

“The picture that pleases the Chinese may not 
“go over” with picture fans in Argentine. The 
distributor must have an intimate first hand 
knowledge of the foreign markets before he 
buys.” 

Pathe Big Factor 

Pathe always was a big factor in the foreign 
field. They were firmly established in Europe 
before the war. Canadian territories are handled 
direct by the American export department of 
Pathe. All other countries are taken care of by 
the French company. Business is done on a ren¬ 
tal basis which leaves Pathe in absolute control 
and with the right to seize any positive film that 
the proper lease cannot be .shown for. Pathe pic¬ 
tures are released in the United States, Canada 
and Australia at the same time. The South Amer¬ 
ican and Oriental markets follow later while the 
London program comes several months later. 
After this comes the “general edition” of the 
French Pathe which is used for Continental Eu¬ 
rope. 

Pathe News is just as, popular in the foreign 
market as it is in the United States. 

Pathe was the first film concern to invade the 
Central Powers after peace was declared. The 
old exchanges were re-opened., Serials were 
something new in Europe and Pathe is. making 
them more popular every day. Present conditions, 
in Russia make it impossible for any firm to do 
business there. When order is restored Pathe will 
invade that field. 


Vitagraph in the Foreign Field 

A. E. Smith, of Vitagraph, was among the first 
of the American producers to invade the foreign 
field after the armistice was signed. One of Vita- 
graph’s first post-war activities was the purchase 
of Ruffell’s system of exchanges in England. 
Ronald A. Rader, Paris representative for Vita¬ 
graph and who was called back to this country 
during the war, has been sent back to Paris and 
has opened new offices in France. A. E. Smith 
has lately announced that he will send a famous 
Vitagraph .star and director to France and Great 
Britain. When the Vitagraph bought Ruffell’s 
exchanges this concern practically controlled the 
booking of northern England. They were one of 
the few concerns to screen every picture before 
selling it. Ruffell’s include the following cities: 
Northumberland, Durham, Westmoreland and 
Cumberland, with headquarters at New Castle- 
on-Tyne. Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nettingham- 
shire and Berbyshire, with headquarters at Leeds 
are also included. Lancashire, Cheshire and 
North Wales, with headquarters at Manchester; 
Staffordshire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Wor¬ 
cestershire and Leicestershire, with headquarters 
at Birmingham; South Wales and Hartfordshire, 
with headquarters, at Cardiff, and Scotland, with 
headquarters at Glasgow. New offices have been 
opened in the following cities:—Marseilles, Bor¬ 
deaux, Dunkirk, Havre, Lyons, Nice and Toulon. 

In 1905 A. E. Smith first introduced Vitagraph 
pictures in England. He established the office in 
Paris the following year. They have a location 
and plant at Courbevois, a surburb of Paris, and 
also a larger plant at Gennevillier. It covers, eight 
acres. 


Universal in the Foreign Field 

According to Carl Laemmle, Universal will be 
represented in every corner of the world the com¬ 
ing season. Many of the foreign countries will 
be locations for Universal films. Universal has 
sent representatives during the fall and winter to 
every foreign country. Universal has, 175 repre¬ 
sentatives in foreign countries. There are but 
two countries in South America that Universal 
does not yet enter. They are not distributing in 
the Central Powers at the present. Exchanges 
will be established soon in all the foreign coun¬ 
tries and those that have been handling Universal 
film will be bought up. 

The Roma-New York Pictures, Corporation will 
cover Italy. Russia and the near Orient market 
as w’ell as the rest of the Orient and the Asiatic 
countries. Roma-New York will be the first 




N OT alone Stories by authors 
of international popularity— 

Not alone Stars of world-wide 
recognition— 

Not alone Directors of unassail¬ 
able standing— 

But 

The best stories of the best authors brought to 
life on the screen under their personal super¬ 
vision. 

Interpreted by artists, selected to fit their parts , 
rather than having these parts mutilated to fit 
them. 

Produced by directors committed to the develop¬ 
ment of every element of the picture, for the 
picture, rather than for the star! 


Sidney Garrett Th&icLnt 

729 Seventh Ave. NewY>rk 


Exporters of 
Better- than-A verage 
Pictures . 






























American-Foreign made films. There are now 
three Universal companies producing in foreign 
countries. The Smithsonian African Expedition 
in conjunction with the Universal will be the 
greatest enterprise of its kind in recent year-Si. 
The company under the direction of William Sto- 
well and Dr. Edmund Heller will return in 1920. 
Another foreign company is headed by W. F. Al¬ 
der and Edward Laemmle. They are in the Ori¬ 
ent. Marie Walcamp, serial star, is being fea¬ 
tured in a serial now being made in Japan. 


Robertson-Cole 

Long before their entrance into the domestic 
field Robertson-Cole had gained prominence in 
the exporting, importing and international bank¬ 
ing field. They played an important part in estab¬ 
lishing American motion pictures in foreign lands. 
They are of the opinion that the silent drama is 
unhampered by language or custom,, tragedy 
strikes just as deep the heart of an Englishman, 
Frenchman, Italian, or American while comedy is 
just as humorous to the entire world in general. 
One reason for the success of their product in 
the foreign field according to Robertson-Cole is 
the fact that in locale and detail most of their 
productions have as, backgrounds the foreign 
countries which make the films popular in this 
country and doubly so in the countries repre¬ 
sented. Bessie Barriscale has appeared recently 
in films with settings in Egypt, Italy and France; 
Sessue Hayakawa in plays with the atmosphere 
of Tnd’a, Tta^. Japan and Scotland; H. B. War¬ 
ner’s productions have been staged in Northern 
Africa, China and India. 


British Producers 

London— 

Artistic Film Co..93-95 Warder St. 

Geo. F. Redman, Managing Director. 

Barker Motion Photography, Ltd.1 Soho Square 

ATr. Smit, Managing Director. 

Birmingham Prod. Co., Topical House 88, John Bright 

Street 

British Lion Films. Ltd.30 Gerrard St. 

Managing Director, David Falcke. 

Broadwest Films, Ltd.175 Warder St. 

Directors, G. T. Broadbridge and W. West. 
Butchers Film Service, Ltd., Camera House, Farring¬ 
ton Ave. 

Famous Pictures, Ltd.76 Finsbury Pavement 

Gen. Manager, Edwin H. Wright. 

Gaiety Prod.151 Wardour St. 

Producer, Maurice Sandground. 

Harma Films.101 Wardour St. 

Hepworth Mfg. Co.2 Denman St. 

Managing Director, Cecial M. Hepworth. 

London Film Co., Ltd.199 Piccadilly West 

Managing Director, F. E. Adams. 

Master Films, Ltd.26 Litchfield St. 

Midland Actors Film Prod. Co., Ltd.76 Broad St., 

Managing Director, M. Leder. Birmingham 

Pathe Freres...184 Warder St. 

Progress Film Co. . .101 Wardour St. 

Managing Director, Frank E. Spring. 


Samuelson Film Mfg. Co., Ltd., Worton Hall, Isle- 

worth, Middlesex 

Scottish Artistic Film Prod. Co., 95 Renfield St., Glas¬ 
gow 

Stoll Film Co.155 Oxford St. 

Jefferey Bernerd, Managing Director. 

The British Actors.... Grafton House, Golden Square 
Adrien Brunei, Managing Director 

The Ideal Film Renting Co. 76-78 Wardour St. 

The Gaumont Co., Ltd.5 and 6 Sherwood St. 

Managing Director, Lt. Co. A. C. Bromhaed. 
Welsh, Pearson and Co., Ltd., Broadmead House, 

Panton St., Haymarket 
Managing Director, T. A. Welsh. 

Windsor Films, Ltd.The Hall, Bromley Road 


British Exchanges 

There are according to Kinemetograph Year Book 
of 1919 112 film exchanges in London. 

The provincial renters (exchanges) are: Accrington 
1, Aldershot 1, Bath 1, Beeford 1, Birkenhaed 1, 
Birmingham 29, Bishop Auckland 1, Blackburn 3, 
Bradford 2, Bristol 4, Cleckheaton 1, Coventry 1. Dar¬ 
lington 1, Derby 2, Erdington 1, Featherstone 1, 
Yorks 1, Gloucester 1, Great Yarmouth 1, Halifax 1, 
Hanley 1, Hull 1, Huncoat 1, Ipswich 1, Lancaster 1, 
Leeds 26, Liscard 1, Liverpool 25, Maidstone 1, 
Manchester 78, March, Carmbs 1, Middleton, Lancs 1, 
Nantwich, Cheshire 1, Newcastle-on-Tyne 24, North¬ 
hampton 1, Nottingham 10, Plymouth 1, Preston 3, 
Pudsey, Yorks, 1, Reading 1, Rickmansworth 2. Sea- 
combe 1, Sheffield 7, Sittingbourne 1, Southampton 1, 
Southchurch (Essex) 1, Stoke 1, Sunderland 2, Swin- 
den 1, Torquay 1, Westcliffe-on-Sea 1. 

Wales 

Cardiff 30, Newport 2, Swansea 1, Dundee 1, Edin¬ 
burgh 5, Glasgow 35, Paisely 1. 

Ireland 

Belfast 6, Dublin 19, Wexford 1. 


Theaters in France 

There are 225 picture theaters in Paris and speak¬ 
ing roughly about thirteen hundred in the rest of 
France. Marseilles, 45 picture theaters; Bordeaux 30, 
Lyons 28, Amiens 12, Limoges 8, St. Etienne 8, Tou¬ 
louse 10, Grenoble 10, Nantes 12, Calais 10, Nice 20, 
Vichy 7, Brest 6, Rouen 7, Havre 5. In the French 
colonies Algiers has 16, Tunis 6, Casablanca, Morocco 
6, Saginne 5. There are 9 film theaters in Corsica, 
4 at Bastia and 3 at Corte. 

The principal halls in Paris are: Gaumont Palace 
(Hippodrome), Cirque de Hivre, Theatre des Follies 
Dramatiques, Tivoli, Parisiana Palais des Fetes, Co- 
lisee, Aubert Palais, Cinema Opera, Royal Wagram, 
Mozart Palace, Maillot, American Theatre and the 
Pathe Palace. The receipts at all of the cinema 
houses are extremely good. At a popular theater like 
the Tivoli the takings in the first week in September 
(during hot weather) were Frs. 71,713. The Gau¬ 
mont Palace has an orchestra of forty pieces and the 
takings there average Frs. 150,000. 


French Producers 

E. Crumiere & Cie.Falvia, Ardeche, France 

J. Demaria.35 Rue de Flichy, Paris 

Societe L. Gaumont.28 Rue des Alouettes, Paris 

G. Lourdier.19 Boulevard St. Denis, Paris 

Harry.61 Rue Chabroil, Paris 

Lutece Films. . .119 Rue de Fontany, Vincennes, Seine 

Societe de Films Silf.27 Rue de Magador, Paris 

Pathe Freres.30 Boulevard des Italiens, Paris 






































Scoema Film.7 Rue de Amboise, Paris 

Jules Verne Film.23 Rue Michodiere, Paris 

Vitagraph Co.15 Rue Ste-Cecile, Paris 

Societe des Films.“Le Theatre,” 27 Rue Druot 

Georges Mendel.. 10 bis, Blvd. Bonne, Nouvelle, Paris 

Mazo.33 Boulevard St. Martin, Paris 

Films Natura.38 Rue des Mathurins, Paris 

Societe Securtias.33 Rue de Provence, Paris 

Societe General Eclipse, 23 Rue de la Michodiere, Paris 
G. Melies.16 Passage de la Opera, Paris 


French Exchanges 

PARIS— 

Itala Film.3 Rue Beregere 

Foucher and Joanott.,,.31 Boulevard Bonne, Nouvelle 

Jacoppozzi.44 Rue de Bundy 

Raoult Film Location.19 Rue Beregere 

Societe Royal Vio.31 Rue St. Beregere 

S. A. M. Films.10 Rue S. Lazarre 

Western Import Co.83 bis Rue Lafayette 

J. Haik.83 bis Rue Lafayette 

Photodrama Co. of Chicago.55 Rue St. Lazarre 

Agence General Cinematographique. . 16 Rue Grange 
Bata Here. 

Translantic Co.26 Rue Feydeau 

L. Aubert.Ave. de la Republique 

Harry.61 Rue de Chibrol 

Aveline and Delalande. . . . 104 Faorbourg, Poisonierre 

Ideal Cinema.61 Faubourg, St. Denis 

C. Halley.19 bis Rue Richer 

Central Film Service.51 bis Rue Sainte Anne 

Adam and Cie...11 Rue Baudin 

R. Navarre.44 Rue Taitbout 

Van Goitsenhoven. ...10 Rue de Chateaudun 

Union Cinematographique de France. .34 Rie Charles, 
Baudlaire. 

Urban Trading Co.23 Ruede la Michodiere 

P. Burgi.42 Rue d'enghien 

Pathe Freres.30 Boulevard des Italiens 

L. Gaumont.28 Rue des Aoulettes 

L. Sutto.9 Place de la Bourse 


Pictures in Spain 

Although the war shut off a large part of the supply 
of the Spanish motion picture theaters business re¬ 
mained satisfactory, though good films were not ob¬ 
tainable. A number of new film houses have been 
built since the close of the war. Madrid, Barcelona, 
Valencia, Seville, Jere Bilbao and San Sebastine, all 
have many beautiful theaters and are considered 
important picture centers. The Italian, French and 
Danish films are accorded a hearty reception by 
Spaniards. Among the American films shown are 
Paramount, World, Vitagraph and Fox. The Chaplin 
pictures are also shown. 

Ruiz Margarit, a Spanish writer, mentions Mary 
Pickford, Marguerite Clark, Fanny Ward, Clara Kim¬ 
ball Young, Bessie Barriscale, Mabel Normand, Geral¬ 
dine Farrar, Douglas Fairbanks, Wallace Reid, Eddie 
Polo, as being popular in Spain. 

The fact that the different film companies do not 
work together in Spain as they should is responsible 
for a loss in money frequently. If there were more 
unity in their operations all would benefit. There is 
an absolute absence of commercial unity. 

Where one firm owns more than one hall in Spain 
and is booking for four or five they are only charged 
the price of one. 

Censorship considered as a whole in Spain is very 
tolerant. Because of the fact that there has been a 
large amount of money lost in Spain there are few 
producing companies there. 


Spanish Producers 


BARCELONA— 

Abot Films.Aaragon, 249 

Barciongrafo.S. A. Dipucation, 280 id. 

Condal Film.Arguelles, 482 (Diagonal) 

Elaber Films.Carret ra de sana, 77 

Falce Films.Calle de la Industria, 202 

Hispanoa Films.Craywinckel, 20 

Segge Films.S. A. Consego Ciento, 294 

Studio Films...S. A. Universidad 13 


Dessy Films; Momo Films; Lotos Films. 
MADRID— 

Patria Films; Cervantes Films. 


Trade in Italy 

Italian films, after having established great prestige 
in this country with such notable productions as ‘‘The 
Last Days of Pompei,” “Quo Vadis,” “Julius Caesar,” 
“Anthony and Cleopatra” and the “Siege of Carthage” 
and many other big productions, have declined since 
the beginning of the war due to the fact that the 
Italian studios have been taken over for war purposes 
and Red Cross activities. 

Now that peace has been declared the Italians are 
once more entering the film producing field with even 
greater enthusiasm. Several firms have signified their 
intention of filming great British and American books 
and the result should prove interesting. There is 
considerable exchange today between the Italian firms 
and the British manufacturers. Universal will ex¬ 
change with Italian producers for distribution in this 
country. 


Italian Producers 


MILAN— 

Milano Films.Bovisa 

Cinem Darama.5 Via S. Dalmazio 

Raggio Film.1 Via Solferino 

Armenia Films.34 Via Boccaccio 

Mercurio Film.1 Via Romagnosi 

Luca Comerio.4 ia Serbelloni 

Silentium Film...8 Via Sylvio, Pellico 

TURIN— 

Itala Film.Ponte Trombetta 

Ambrosio Flim.56 Via Mantova 

Savoia Films.18 Via Astia 

Pasqualli Film.i.75 Corso Stipinigi 

Azienda Tecnica Cinegrafica Carlucci.18 Via Asti 

I. N. C. I. T.39 Via Quittengo 

Delta Film.336 Via Balangegro 

Cleo Film.5 Via Tiziano 

Jupiter Film.3 ia Belfiore 

Italica Film.43 Via Nizza 

Gladiator Film.8 Via S. Enselmo 

Latina Ars.29 Via Roma 

Itala-Egizianno Film.52 bis Via Canova 

Rodolfi Film.14 Corso Vercelli 

Fabreges Film.Seal A. G. Galleria Nazionale 

ROME— 

Cines.. .51 Via Macerata 

Celio Film.Giardino Zoologico 

Palatino Film.8 Piazza, SS. Giovanna, e Paoli 

Tiber Film.11 Piazza, Venezia 

Caesar Films.47 Esedra, de Terimni 

Medusa Films.3 Lungo Teverre, Castello 

Flegrea Film.Via Appia Nuova 

Tespi Film.36 Via Palermo 

Floreal Film.104 Via Agostino Depretis 

Pecorni and Co..109 Via Sistina 










































































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Telephones: Bryant 1166 , 10177 Cable Address: Howellfilm , New York 























Aurea Film.32 Via Avignonesi 

Olympus Film.73 Viain Arcionne 

Do-Re-Me.96 Via Troino 

Filmgraf.54 Via Macerata 

Guazzonni Film.34 Via Veneto 

Coloseum Film.ton Via Antonia, Nibbi 

Film d’ Arte Italiana. . . .4 Vicolo, Parioli, Villa, Fras- 
chetti. 

NAPLES— 

Polifilm.Via Cimarosa, al Vormero 


Trade in Holland 

A LL the neutral countries were hit hard by the 
war and Holland was no exception. The war 
made raw stock hard to obtain. Thus the produc¬ 
tion of pictures in Holland during the war was 
practically at a standstill. 

During the war Dutch kinemas just managed 
to change their programs weekly. This was made 
possible by the big stocks of films that the ex¬ 
changes had on their shelves. These supple¬ 
mented by a few which managed to find their 
way into Holland during the war were the sole 
means of entertainment in the cinema line. Most 
of the pictures shown in Holland during the war 
were of poor calibre and all in all the standard 
was low. One big handicap to the Dutch renter 
is the fact that very few films are screened before 
a purchase is made. They cannot, therefore, as¬ 
certain in, advance what they are buying unless 
the film has already acquired an international 
reputation. This is one of the reasons why the 
bulk of the films shown during the war in Hol¬ 
land were German. 

In the future Dutch film buyers will not close 
for pictures unless a trade screening is held to 
demonstrate the merits of the different produc¬ 
tions. 

Picture theaters in Holland have been very 
heavily taxed during the war and the Dutch 
Kinema Exhibitor’s Association is fighting ad¬ 
verse legislation. 

Dutch Producers 

Amsterdam Film Co., Spui, 7 Amsterdam. 

Fote-Technisch Fimatelier, Prinsengracht, 881 
Amsterdam. 

B. Mullens, Amstel, 59 Amsterdam. 

Wilfofilm (World’s International Film Office), 
Mauikskade, 25 Amsterdam. 

Rembrandt Film Co. V. Baerlerstraat, 162 Am¬ 
sterdam. 

Filmfabriek Hollandia, Spaarne, 57 Haalarme. 

Filmfabriek Haghe, Joan Maetsukerstr, 21 Den 
Haag. 

F. A. Noggerath,, Wagenstraat, 22 Amsterdam. 


Beecroft’s Enlightening Views 

As to the opportunities for foreign business during 
the coming year: my own information, gleaned from 
two trips abroad during the war and one since the 
signing of the armistice, leads me to believe that the 
foreign market, so far as Europe is concerned, will be 
surfeited with American film and with film produced in 


England, Italy, Copenhagen, Paris, and other produc¬ 
ing centres which were active in this market before 
the war. 

Manufacturers here in the United States are inclined 
to greatly over-rate the value of their productions in 
Europe. It is difficult indeed to convince them that 
Germany and Austria-Hungary and the Balkan states 
are not wide-open markets and ready to pay fabulous 
prices for American-made films, or that Russia is not 
a storehouse of gold waiting to be exchanged for 
Yankee Motion Pictures. As a matter of fact, restric¬ 
tions upon the shipping of film into Germany have not 
yet been removed. No one knows how the geographical 
divisions will result, and the matter of money ex¬ 
change in both these countries is still an unsolved 
problem. In some of the new territories, such as 
Poland, Czecho-Slovakia, Jugo-Slovakia, Roumania, 
etc., there is a strict rescript against the sending of 
any money out of the state. Russia has no medium 
of exchange. The ruble, the former unit of exchange, 
has been printed by the ton by the Lenine Government 
for the express purpose of abolishing money as a me¬ 
dium, and is consequently valueless at the present time. 
No one knows how it is possible to obtain his payments 
even if it were possible to ship film into Russia. From 
the Kerensky regime to the present time it has been 
utterly impossible to send film into Russia, except per¬ 
haps with the help of the United States Government, 
and this only as far as Archangel in the north and 
possibly Vladivostok in the extreme west. This was 
done to a very limited extent by the Committee on 
Public Information, and a few productions they took 
up there were shown gratuitously in army camps, etc. 
It may be possible that some highly financed concern, 
such as the American Harvester Co., might find it 
feasible to do business in Russia by accepting securi¬ 
ties or guarantees in the way of agricultural products 
or concessions to some of the great natural resources 
in certain parts of Russia and Siberia. In the Film 
business, however, it is necessary to obtain a value in 
dollars for every picture disposed of, and this I do 
not believe can be accomplished within the next two 
years, and even this prognostication, dreary as it seems, 
is really an expression of optimism. 

In my recent trip abroad I was so fortunate as to 
have the well-known American banker, Frank A. 
Vanderlip, as a fellow-passenger. Among other sub¬ 
jects touching on an import revival in the Central 
Powers and the Balkans, we discussed the Russian 
situation. Without quoting Mr. Vanderlip, I might 
say that the views set forth in this letter are not at 
variance with his. 

No Means of Distribution 

I went through Russia and Finland in 1917. The 
Scandinavian Film Agency, Ltd., of Copenhagen which 
I represent, was at that time the second largest rental 
concern in these territories. We had an enormous 
campaign laid out and believe that we would have 
been able to develop it from an eight to perhaps a 
twenty print territory. We had three offices operating 
in Petrograd, Moscow, and Odessa, and had worked 
out a scheme for connecting up several exhibition 
centres which have never had motion picture 
theaters for the reason that there have been no rail 
connections from town to town and that the roads 
were too rough to permit of automobile travel. There 
was no means of circulating the film for profitable 
distribution. One enterprising concern was at that 
time preparing to send out several operators with port¬ 
able machines and a supply of film to pioneer vast 
territories and open the way for a regular circuit. The 
Bolshevik rule, however, nipped all these plans in the 
bud. Our own offices were sealed up by the Bolshevik 
agents and by representatives of the Danish Govern¬ 
ment before they were recalled. These offices were 
thoroughly equipped, complete in every way as going 
exchanges. We can only hope that these seals have 
not been violated, as if they have not, we will be In 











\ 


Export & 

Import Film Co., Inc. 

729 Seventh Avenue 
New York City 


A N American motion picture Exporting Or¬ 
ganization that has won exceptional 
standing throughout the world because 
of a strict policy of “always delivering the 

goods.” | 


The foremost producers have learned that we 
know whereof we speak when we discuss foreign 
market conditions. Our business dealings with 
them have been convincing that we always play 
1 fair. 

Prospective customers have their best guarantee 
of our integrity and stability in our record of 
past performances. 

Always in the Market for the Worth-While 
Productions—and Prepared to Back 
Our Judgment with Real Money 




1265-1269 BROADWAY 

Rene Silz, General Manager 

GUA'RAJSTTEET) ’DIST'RI'BUTIOJS 


FOR INDUSTRIAL AND ADVERTISING FILMS 
FOR ALL THE LEADING MOTION PICTURE THEATRES OF 

FRANCE AND BELGIUM 

CONTROLLING INDUSTRIAL and ADV’G FILM RIGHTS 
for FRENCH LINE STEAMERS (52 Boats Yearly) 

INQUIRIES INVITED 

Rene SlLZ, General Manager 

Telephones 9515-9516 Madison Square 1265-1269 Broadway, New York 
























































a position to resume business in a very active manner 
the instant it is possible to obtain money for film and 
send it out of the country. 

I have purchased during the last two years what I 
believe to be the cream of the American produc¬ 
tions. We control upward of 200 features, 5 series 
of comedies, 2 serials and one set of scenics; all sel¬ 
ected specially for their fitness for European distribu¬ 
tion. Much of this material is in Europe waiting the 
happy day when we will be able to exchange it for 
mopey in the Central Powers, the so-called Balkan 
States, and Russia. We are the first on the ground 
with actual film to be moved in, and have been 
making a particular study of the problems of distri¬ 
bution there during the war, following every develop¬ 
ment that might have a bearing on commercial inter¬ 
course after the war. When money can be got out of 
these territories I feel sure that there is no one better 
equipped to get it than our concern, and I feel there¬ 
fore that I am qualified to answer your question with 
considerable emphasis. 

French Market Good 

The American market in France is very good in¬ 
deed owing mainly to the fact that during the war 
France and the surrounding Allied territories could 
obtain little or none of the productions with which it 
was familiar. It was forced to rely upon American 
films to meet its requirements. All of us owe a great 
■aeal to the Famous Players-Lasky for the skillful way 
In which it handled this situation and for the method 
in which its films were distributed by the powerful 
Gaumont organization. Other films of American man¬ 
ufacture were distributed there during the war, but 
never with anything like the same definite policy or 
comparative degree of success. Messrs. Emil Shauer, 
John Cecil Graham of the Famous Players, and Leon 
Gaumont handled the situation so brilliantly that the 
French public became thoroughly familiar with the 
representative American stars and have learned to 
appreciate the merits of the better class American 
productions as compared with the Continental and 
British productions to which they were accustomed. 
As a result, the French market will probably offer 
splendid opportunities to the American producer, but 
it must be borne in mind that all the film from every 
producing point in the world will be offered to this 
•comparatively small market for distribution, which 
will no doubt affect prices quite sharply when the 
oversupply becomes a fact. There are many large 
towns in France which have never yet had moving 
picture theaters and a big building plan is already 
under way by a company operating with French capi¬ 
tal. The territory will consequently increase in value, 
but the old rule of supply and demand will obtain 
here as everywhere. 

In considering Germany, Austria-Hungary and the 
Balkan States, it should be borne in mind that these 
territories have not had the benefit of extensive pio¬ 
neering as in the case of France, and our stars and 
productions, with a few very rare exceptions, have no 
particular meaning to the buyers there. Southern 
Europe has always been a dull market for American 
films, but these peoples seem to be showing a more 
kindly disposition toward our pictures, and as they 
grow more familiar with our stars and methods this 
market should improve. 

Surplus in United Kingdom 

The United Kingdom, with one sixth as many the¬ 
aters, is now being asked to consume the film which 
is being produced for the American market each 
week. In addition to this continuous production, 
almost every manufacturer has a quantity of film on 
hand, accumulated during the war. Add to this the 
large output promised by the British concerns and 


American concerns operating in England, and you 
should be able to draw your own mental picture of 
conditions there. So much film, good, bad, and in¬ 
different has beeri offered and accepted there that 
bookings are now being made more than a year in 
advance of the date of purchase. This condition nat¬ 
urally calls for a system of credits, as few buying or 
distributing concerns can afford to carry such invest¬ 
ments. It is true that many theaters, exchanges and 
buyers were forced out of business through lack of 
man power during the war, and as these resume, trade 
will correspondingly increase. Then, too, I look for 
a departure from the present policy of two shows a 
week to more frequent—possibly daily—changes of 
program, and to the building of many more first class 
theaters throughout the realm, which will also in¬ 
crease England’s buying capacity. Increase in British 
and British-American production will probably offset 
this, however, and it occurs to me that only those are 
safe who are sure they have good pictures to deliver, 
and who know that they can maintain a high average 
of production when a series of pictures is to be mar¬ 
keted. 

Our pictures are popular, and can remain so as long 
as they are better than those offered in competition, 
but I believe that this market will rapidly find its 
level and that well press-agented hocum will not much 
longer outrage the faith and confidence of British 
buyers and distributors. Those who have good pic¬ 
tures need have no fear of a ready and continuously 
profitable market—for the rest “Let them look to It.” 
And the sooner the better for the industry at home 
and abroad. 

CHESTER BEECROFT. 


Next Few Years Good Business Assured 

In pre-war days fully 85% of the pictures shown 
in Latin-America were European. Then came the 
war, closing the European source of supply, compelling 
the introduction of American films on a large scale. 
The inevitable result; the shifting of public favor 
towards the superior American productions and the 
present American dominacy of Latin markets. While 
European capitalists and industrial factors are striving 
to combat the unpleasant political developments, Amer¬ 
ican exporters are establishing our film in Europe; 
American producers are on the ground buying up or 
building studios, while American capitalists are ready 
to buy or build theaters on a great scale. Once edu¬ 
cated up to the high standard of American films, 
Europe’s theater going public will be hard to satisfy 
with any other class of pictures. Only two things can 
happen to offset a complete domination of European 
markets and these are: 

First: A complete and thorough rehabilitation of the 
method of production by European manufacturers to 
bring their products up to our mark, which can only 
be accomplished by engaging American technical ex¬ 
perts and equipping their studios and laboratories with 
every modern contrivance used here; and 

Second: By Europe boycotting or limiting the import 
of American films. Both these conditions are very 
likely to happen—in fact they are already happening. 
Great Britain and other leading countries are studying 
American methods of production, while Italy and 
France have indicated their intention to ultimately re¬ 
strict or limit the importation of our pictures, in order 
to preserve their own industry. On the other hand 
it is very likely that the Central powers will shortly 
place an embargo against the importation of any kind 
of film to preserve their gold reserve. For the next 
3 or 4 years to come, at least 70% of the films shown 
in Europe will undoubtedly be American. 

J. H. HOFFBERG, 
Mgr., Co-Operative Film Co. 



EUROPEAN PRODUCTIONS of the HIGHEST 

CLASS 

We Are One of the Oldest and Largest 

# 

FOREIGN PRODUCERS 


FOR NEGATIVE RIGHTS 


WIRE OR WRITE 


The Swedish Biograph Company 

220 West 42d Street, New York 

ERNEST MATTSSON 

Gen. Mgr. 

Offices: 

LONDON 

STOCKHOLM 

PARIS 



REX LABORATORY, Inc. 

1942-44 JEROME AVE., NEW YORK CITY 


WHY 


NOT CONSULT US BEFORE GIVING OUT THAT ORDER 


Our factory is a public film institution maintained for your benefit. 
HOW CAN WE SERVE YOU 


FOREIGN 
AND 

DOMESTIC 

This work is our 
specialty. We main¬ 
tain a complete 
staff of foreign 
translators and 
printers. Accuracv 
before speed is our 
policy; but we aim 
to give both. 


Negative 

Developing 

Don’t spoil a per¬ 
fectly good nega¬ 
tive by poor devel¬ 
oping. Leave it to 
us. We know how. 
We are doing it 
for some of the 
biggest producers. 


Positive 

Printing 

We do commercial 
printing in all its 
branches. All neg¬ 
atives being prop¬ 
erly tested by ex¬ 
perts before going 
into process, assures 
you perfect prints. 


Tin'ing and 
Toring 

We can put the fin¬ 
ishing touches to 
good camera work 
or cover up flaws 
in photography via 
our scientific tinting 
and toning method. 


Service and 
Quality 

We have carried 
the same customers 
on our books for 
years. Our policy 
to do the work of a 
few must inevitably 
result in making 
customers satisfied. 



WE 


DO NOT CLAIM TO BE THE GREATEST- 
BLIT WE ARE AS GOOD AS THE BEST. 


? 

Prices 

We never have ; nor 
will we participate 
in the common 
practice of price 
cutting. A fair 
profit commensu¬ 
rate with the qual¬ 
ity of our work is 
all we seek. 


REX LABORATORY, Inc. 

1942-44 JEROME AVE., NEW YORK CITY 

















Outlook in Eastern Europe 

While it is rather doubtful whether the countries in 
which I have had most of my residential film experi¬ 
ence, viz.: Russia, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Swe¬ 
den, Denmark and Norway, will, with the exception 
of the Scandinavian countries, be during the coming 
year open to much film activity, I still believe that a 
few words concerning these territories which are still 
in a condition of chaos and reconstruction, should be 
of interest to American film producers and exporters. 

The American Association of Commerce and Trade, 
Berlin, numbering among its members such represen¬ 
tative American concerns as the International Har¬ 
vester Co., the National Cash Register Co., Sears, Roe¬ 
buck & Co., the American Multigraph Co., and others, 
was desirous of acquainting American film producers 
with the possibilities for their films in Germany. With 
this end in view I was requested to write an article 
for the Association’s Weekly Bulletin. Copies of the 
Bulletin were sent to practically every producer and 
exporter in the United States. At the conclusion of the 
article the Association offered to assist any American 
firm desirous of investigating this market in securing 
for them adequate representatives and in every way 
aiding to make the project a success. Not one inquiry 
was received by the American Association of Commerce 
and Trade. 

When one considers that it is but seldom that the 
European producer spent over $4,000 or $5,000 on the 
production of a feature, that but little advancement in 
lighting and technical effects has been made in Euro¬ 
pean studios during the last ten years and that pro¬ 
duction in these countries during the last few years 
has been greatly curtailed, one can readily imagine the 
possibilities for American films throughout Russia, 
Germany and the countries which formerly comprised 
Austria-Hungary. Economic conditions in Germany 
and Austria must soon be settled and trading will be 
possible. Revolution cannot last forever in Russia. 


Then will come the days of reconstruction and indus¬ 
try. Railroads will be built, mines opened, towns and 
cities will spring up and the first form of amusement 
will be the “movie.” Especially in Russia do I look 
for unparallelled prosperity for the wide-awake film 
man. With 180,000,000 people, vast tracts of unde¬ 
veloped mines of every description, thousands of miles 
of railroads to be built, vast areas of wheat, rye and 
cattle land, one scarcely dares dream of the oppor¬ 
tunities which will be unfolded in this enormous coun¬ 
try. With but 2,000 theaters in 1914 how many 
thousands of theaters will be built to provide amuse¬ 
ment and recreation for this nation with a population 
nearly twice that of the United States? 

JOSEPH A. FLEITZER. 


PERCENTAGE RATIOS FOR CONTI¬ 
NENTAL EUROPE 


Russia . 5% 

Switzerland . 2 % 

France .-v. 25% 

Holland . 2 % 

Egypt . 2 % 

Belgium . 2 % 

Italy . 6 % 

Sweden . 15% 

Norway . 6 % 

Denmark . 6 % 

Finland . 2 % 

Germany . 15% 

Austria-Hungary . 8% 

Bulgaria and Turkey. 4% 


100 % 


Film Export Figures for Year 

Domestic exports of motion picture film from the United States by months 
from September , 1918, to August , 1919, inclusive , showing quantities 
and values monthly , as reported by the Bureau of Foreign 

and Domestic Commerce 

UNEXPOSED EXPOSED 


1918 

Lin. Ft . 

Value 

Lin. Ft. 

Value 

September. 

. 7,816,465 

$254,548 

5,377,422 

$354,966 

October . 

. 5,274,394 

116,109 

3,559,562 

214,713 

November. 

. 8,201,150 

187,610 

8,242,046 

457,976 

December . 

. 11,319,325 

243,512 

7,564,658 

590,818 

1919 





January . 

. 19,264,838 

416,549 

8,991,906 

570,980 

February . 

. 4,645,525 

177,082 

11,542,383 

689,903 

March . 

. 19,930,229 

412,323 

11,522,371 

717,638 

April . 

. 405,456 

117,38 

12,107,273 

619,793 

May . 

. 1,562,617 

47,560 

8,061,502 

484,103 

June . 

. 14,461,001 

279,554 

11,977,556 

641,820 

July. 

. 7,425,812 

186,510 

8,283,727 

534,700 

August. 

. 1,215,603 

59,441 

11,889,626 

610,766 


































A screen personality of delightful originality 
and freshness, he disproves the theory that “no¬ 
body loves a fat man.” Bill's bright beaming 
smile is catching. Audiences catch his enthu¬ 
siasm. Exhibitors catch more of the quarters 
and dimes. 

Bill's a good catch. Catch on. 

“Smiling Bill" appears personally every week 
Every other week he presents 


Smiling Bill 

D ARSON 


A young couple, Carter and his wife, they 
stand alone as regular program fun-makers. 

Their work in the past releases has been so 
good that they have come near to making the 
highest average in the comedy field. Both they 
and Smiling Bill Parsons are in the Capitol 
Comedies, released through GOLDWYN. 


ICTU 









































































Legal Holidays in the United States 

Jan. i —New Year’s Day (Except in Mass, and Dist. of 
Col.). 

Jan. 19—Birthday of Gen. Lee (in Ala., Ark., Fla., 
Ga., Miss., N. C., S. C., Va.). 

Feb. 12—Lincoln’s Birthday (in almost every state) 

Feb. 12—Georgia Day in Ga. 

Feb. 22—Washington’s Birthday (all over Union). 

Mar. 4 —Mardi Gras (in Ala., Fla., La., in the parishes 
of Orleans, St. Bernard, Jefferson, St. Charles, and 
St. John the Baptist. 

Mar. 17—Arbor Day (in Okla.). 

April 6—Arbor Day (in N. Ariz.). 

April 12—Halifax Independence Resolutions (in N. 
Car.). 

April 13—Jefferson’s Birthday (in Ala.). 

April 15—Arbor Day (in Utah). 

April 18—Good Friday (in Ala., Conn., Del., Fla., La., 
Md., Minn., N. J., Pa., and Tenn. 

April 19—Patriot’s Day (in Me., Mass.). 

April 21—San Jacinto Day (in Tex.). 

April 21—Arbor Day (in Col. and Neb.). 

April 23—Fast Day (in N. H.). 

April 26—Confed. Mem. Day (in Ala., Fla., Ga., and 
Miss.). 

May 9 —Arbor Day (in R. I.). 

May 10—Confed. Mem. Day (in N. Car., S. Car., and 
Tenn.). 

May 12—Mothers’ Day (in N. Mex.). 

May 18—Peace Day (in N. Mex.). 

May 20—Anniv. Signing of the Mecklenburg Declara¬ 
tion of Independence (in N. Car.). 

May 30—Memorial Day (in Ariz., Cal., Col., Conn., 
Del., Dist. of Col., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Ia., Kan., Ky., 
Me., Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Mo., Mont., Neb., 
Nev., N. H., N. J., N. Mex., N. Y., N. Dak., Ohio, 


Okla., Ore., Pa., R. I., S. Dak., Tenn., Vt., Va., 
Wash., W. Va., Wis., Wyo.). 

May 30—Confed. Mem. Day (in Va.). 

June 3—Jefferson Davis’ Birthday (in Ala., Ark., Fla., 
Ga., Miss., S. Car., Tenn., Tex.). 

June 3—Confed. Memorial Day (in La.). 

June 15—Pioneer Day (in Idaho). 

June 17—Bunker Hill Day (in Boston). Not a legal 
holiday, but banks close by general agreement. 

July 4—Independence Day (all over Union). 

July 24—Pioneer Day (in Utah). 

Aug. 1—Colorado Day (in Col,). 

Aug. 16—Bennington Battle Day (in Vt.). 

Aug. 20=21—Good Roads Days (in Mo.). 

Sept. 2—Labor Dav (except in N. Mex. and Dist of 
Col.). 

Sept. 9-—Admission Day (in Cal.). 

Sept. 12-—Old Defender’s Day (in Baltimore, Md.). 

Oct. 7—Missouri Day (in Mo.). 

Oct. 12—Columbus Day (in Ala., Ariz., Ark., Cal., 
Conn., Col., Del., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Kan., Ky., Me., 
Md., Mass., Mich., Mo., Mont., Neb., Nev., N. H., 
N. J., N. Mex., N. Y„ Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R. I., 
Tex., Va., Wash., W. Va.). 

Oct. 13—Farmers’ Day (in Fla.). 

Oct. 26—Fraternal Day (in Ala.). 

Oct. 31—Admission Day (in Nev.). 

Nov. 1—All Saints’ Day (in La.). 

Nov. 1—State Fire Day (in Neb.). 

Nov. 4—Election Day (1st Tuesday after the 1st Mon- 
dav in November. All over Union, except Dist. of 
Coir). 

Nov. 27—National Thanksgiving Day (usually the 
last Thursday in November. In every State and 
Dist. of Col.). 

Dec. 3—Arbor Day (in Ga.). 

Dec. 25—Christmas Day (all over Union). 


THOMAS R. MILLS 


DIRECTOR 


FRANK S. HEATH 

ASSISTANT 


See “WID’S” Data 


s 







Four Exceptional Productions 

for release during 1920 


EXCEPTIONAL STORIES 
EXCEPTIONAL CASTS 
EXCEPTIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 


With Edgar Lewis Direction 



Edgar Lewis Productons, Inc. 


Distributors: 

Pathe 

25 W. 45* Street 

New York City 


Suite 809 

1457 Broadway 

New York City 






























Gilbert Hamilton 

M. P. D. A. 


Directing 

June Elvidge 

World Film Corporation 


Warren Fromme 


ASSISTING 

Hobart Henley 








Oscar C. Apfel 

DIRECTOR 

“AUCTION OF SOULS" 



Now making 

(T p FEL Productions ^ 
Released through World 

Evelyn Greeley 

in 

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"WRINGING UP BETTY” 

" THE OAKDALE AFFAIR ” 


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VICTOR EUBANK 



director General 


of Essanay for Five Years — Responsible for such Successes as 

"SKINNER’S DRESS SUIT” "RUGGLES OF RED GAP” 

" GRAUSTARK ” " ON TRIAL ” 

"EFFICIENCY EDGAR” "A PAIR OF SIXES” 

"THE MISLEADING LADY” and numerous others 

Permanent Address: 

THE FRIARS CLUB - 12J5ST2R 










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CHARLES MILLER 

PRESENTING 

UNUSUAL FEATURES 


Charles Miller Productions 

Incorporated 



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Charles Miller Productions 


Unusual Features 

made by 

an unusual organization; 

where each man’s job 

is the biggest thing he knows; 

and each man aspires 

to have his own organization 

after awhile; 

where the boss says: 

“Tell me what you are going to do — 

Don’t ask me how to do it!” 

an unusual organization; 

well, not as big 

as Bethlehem Steel, 

but equally efficient. 

Because it can turn out 

“Rolls Royce” productions 

as well as the sturdy, 

well-knit kind of pictures 

that the “other” ten thousand exhibitors 

can easily afford to play 

And make money at the same time 

All of which 

is not “intentions” 

But simply unusual facts. 


CHARLES MILLER STUDIOS 

230 WEST 38th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 




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■ 


Edward Earle 

STARRING UNDER THE PERSONAL DIRECTION OF 

Charles Miller 


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FLORENCE BILLINGS 

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NANCY DEAVER 

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Charles Miller Productions 

EARLY RELEASES 

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A Tremendous Spectacle 

Kipling’s undying theme: 

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and West is West) 
and never the twain shall meet.” 


'Highspeed'' “The Valley SL North” 

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CHARLES MILLER STUDIOS 


230 WEST 38th STREET 
NEW YOFnK CITY 





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Lambs Club 






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FRANK MILLS 

264 WEST 57th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

• . 

TELEPHONE, CIRCLE 1561 



Edmund 


Fox Feature Director 

Producer of the Following Successes: 

THE LOVE AUCTION 
> QUEEN OF HEARTS 

W DAUGHTER OF FRANCE 

1L VIRGINIA* 1 PEARSON 

K MM THE FIREBRAND 

RC'% THE LURE OF AMBITION 

l|f£|§7 THEDA BARA 

W SUPER-PRODUCTION 

CHEATING HERSELF 

j0Zwgr THE MERRY-GO-ROUND 

Bufllagg^ PEGGY W HYLAND 



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MYRTLE STEDMAN 

Q Happy in my return from a 
wonderful vacation. 

Q Appearing as Cherry Malotte 
in REX BEACH’S 

“The Silver Horde” 

Produced by Goldwyn 





























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FOR EVERYDAY SERVICE 





1919 OCTOBER 1919 


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♦ 



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♦ 






1919 NOVEMBER 1919 


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-♦> 


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•*- 













1919 DECEMBER 1919 


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♦- 








1920 JANUARY 1920 


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♦ 








1920 FEBRUARY 1920 


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1920 

MARCH 

1920 


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T 



♦ 






SUPERIOR 

PRINTING 

QUALITIES 


SUPERIOR 

WEARING 

QUALITIES 


A DURABILITY that resists 

ABUSE AND CLIMATIC CHANGES 
ASSURING LONG LIFE TO THE FILM 


POWERS FILM PRODUCTS, INC. 

1600 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
FACTORY ROCHESTER LABORATORIES 


1920 

APRIL 

1920 

s 

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-1 

1920 

MAY 

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1920 

JUNE 

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1920 

JULY 

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' 


1920 

AUGUST 

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■o- 


♦- 

♦ 






1920 SEPTEMBER 1920 

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POW E R S 

LABORATORIES 

“AT YOUR SERVICE” 


The Powers Printing and Developing Laboratories are the most complete in America 
The equipment lacks nothing that modern ingenuity has devised. The staff has been 
carefully chosen— each man is an expert. Leading producers are not only availing them¬ 
selves of the superior qualities of Powers Film, but they are also using the superior 
services of the Powers Laboratories. 

MAKE SHIPMENTS TO 

LOWERS FILM PRODUCTS, Laboratories, Rochester, New York 


































































































































































































































































































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R. CECIL SMITH 


WRITER 

SIX YEARS WITH THOMAS H. INCE 
NOW WITH SELZNICK PICTURES CORPORATION 










Directors and Their Productions 


e> 


Herewith will be found a complete list of the productions from 
Sept. 1, 1919 to Aug. 31, 1920 classified and alphabetically arranged 

I ^ v 5 Ul 

\ t according to the name of the director. 


Ivan Abraham 
Echo of Youth 
Ashes of Love 
John Adolfl 
Cavell Case 
Oscar Apfel 

To Him That Hath 
The Rough Neck 
Phil-For-Short 
The Little Intruder 
Mandarin’s Gold 
The Grouch 
Bringing Up Betty 
Amateur Widow 
Crook of Dreams 
Auction of Souls 
George Achainbaud 
Love Cheat 
Clarence G. Badger 
Sis Hopkins 
Kingdom of Youth 
Leave It to Susan 
Day Dreams 
Daughter of Mine 
Perfect Lady 

Through the Wrong Door 
George D, Baker 
Unexpected Places 
Lion’s Den 
Castles in the Air 
Peggy Does Her Darndest 
Return of Mary 
Keginald Barker 
Stronger Vow 
Turn of the Wheel 
Hell Cat 
The Brand 
Crimson Gardenia 
The One Woman 
Shadows 

Girl from Outside 
John A. Barry 
Pear Woman 
Fred J. Balshofer 
Man of Honor 
Frank Beal 
Mother I Need You 
Danger Zone 
Divorce Trap 
Broken Commandents 
Chasing Rainbows 
Harry Beaumont 
Thirty a Week 
Wild Goose Chase 
Little Rowdy 
Man and His Money 
Go West Young Man 
One of the Finest 
City of Comrades 
Heartease 

Lord and Lady Algy 
George Beban 
Hearts of Men 
Isadore Bernstein 
Romance of Tarzan 
William Bertram 
Milady O’The Beanstalk 
Old Maid’s Baby 
Sawdust Doll 
Dolly’s Vacation 
Herbert Blache 
The Uplifters 
Fools and Their Money 
Man Who Stayed at Home 


Jeanne of the Gutter 
Parisian Tigress 
Satan Junior 
The Divorce 
The Brat 

J. Stuart Blackton 

Life’s Greatest Problem 
House Divided 
Common Cause 
Littlest Scout 
Frank Borzage 
Toton 

Prudence of Broadway 
Whom the Gods Destroy 
Charles J. Brabin 
His Bonded Wife 
Thou Shalt Not 
Poor Rich Man 
Buchanan’s Wife 
Bertram Bracken 
The Boomerang 
And a Still Small Voice 
Code of the Yukon 
Samuel Brodsky 
House Without Children 
Tod Browning 

Unpainted Woman 
Wicked Darling 
Exquisite Thief 
Set Free 
Brazen Beauty 
Petal On the Current 
Robert Brunton 
Heart of Rachael 
lvenean Buel 

Woman Who Gave 
Woman, Woman 
Yellow Dog 
Fallen Idol 
My Little Sister 
W. Christy Cabanne 
The Pest 
A Regular Fellow 
Mayor of Filbert 
Fighting Through 
God’s Outlaw 
Colin Campbell 
Tongues of Flame 
Who Shall Take My Life 
Sea Flower 
Railroaders 
Little Orphant Annie 
Beware of Strangers 
City of Purple Dreams 
Albert Capellani 
Oh Boy 
Out of the Fog 
The Red Lantern 
Eye for Eye 
Edwin Carewe 
Pals First 
False Evidence 
Way of the Strong 
Shadows of Suspicion 
Easy to Make Money 
Charles Chaplin 
Shoulder Arms 
Sunnyside 

Louis Chaudet 

Long Lane’s Turning 
Love Call 

Girl of My Dreams 
Blue Bonnet 


Emile Chautard 
Marriage Price 
Eyes of the Soul 
Under the Greenwood Tree 
Daughter of the Old South 
Out of the Shadow 
Paid in Full 

George Randolph Chester 
Five Thousand an Hour 

Roy Clements 
When a Woman Strikes 
Crown Jewels 
Elmer Clifton 
Battling Jane 
Boots 

Safe for Democracy 
Peppy Polly 
Kiss or Kill 
I’ll Get Him Yet 
Hope Chest 
Nugget Nell 
Out of Luck 

S. Butler Clonebaugh 

Secret Garden 

Franklin B. Coates 

Romance in the Air 

John H. Collins 
The Gold Cure 

Jack Conway 

Diplomatic Mission 
Desert Law 
George L. Cox 
Tiger Lily 
Frank Crane 
The Scar 

Wanted for Murder 
Unveiling Hand 
Praise Agent 

Donald Crisp 

The Goat 

Something to Do 

Under the Top 

Venus in the East 

Way of a Man With a Maid 

Poor Boob 

Johnny Get Your Gun 

Alan Crosland 

County Cousin 
James Cruze 
Roaring Road 
The Dub 

Alias Mike Moran 
Too Hany Millions 
You’re Fired 
Love Burglar 

Webster Cullison 

In for Thirty Days 

Charles E. Davenport 
Broken Barriers (Khavah) 

J. Searle Dawley 
Twilight 

Everybody’s Business 
Joseph De Grasse 
Wildcat of Paris 
After the War 
Cecil B. De Mille 
Squaw Man 
For Better, for Worse 
Don’t Change Your 
Husband 


William C. De Mille 

Mirandy Smiles 
The Mystery Girl 

Edward Dillon 

Putting One Over 
Never Say Quit 
Luck and Pluck 
Help, Help, Police 
Embarrassment of Riches 

Jack Dillon 

She Hired a Husband 
Silk-Lined Burglar 
Taste of Life 
Love’s Prisoner 
Beans 

Follies Girl 
Burglar by Proxy 
■William C. Dowlan 

Restless Souls 
Irish Eyes 
The Atom 
Loot 

Common Property 
Cowardice Court 
S. Rankin Drew 
Belle of the Season 
Scott Dunlap 
Words and Music 
Be a Little Sport 
Love is Love 
Bernard Durning 
The Unwritten Code 
Allan Dwan 

He Comes Up Smiling 
Getting Mary Married 
Cheating Cheaters 
The Dark Star 
William P. S. Earle 
Love Hunger 
Better Wife 
’Tother Dear Charmer 
J. Gordon Edwards 
When a Woman Sins 
Siren’s Song 
When Men Desire 
Wolves of the Night 
Woman There Was 
The Light 

The Lone Star Ranger 
Salome 

Walter Edwards 
Lady’s Name 
Veiled Adventure 
Plappiness a la Mode 
Mrs. Leffingwell’s Boots 
Romance and Arabella 
Rescuing Angel 
Final Close-Up 
Who Cares 
Gypsey Trail 

Man from Funeral Range 
Girls 

John Emerson 

Come On In 
Good Bye Bill 
Oh You Women 

Robert Ensminger 
Whatever the Cost 

David G. Fisher 
Law of Nature 
Where Bonds Are Loosed 
Carlyle S. Fleming 
The Clouded Name 




BURTON GEORGE 

DI RECTOR 

of SPECIALS 


fust T^eleased 


Coming Release 


“QINQE R” 

/ 

ADDRESS: 

WID’S DAILY, HOLLYWOOD. CAL. 


CHARLOTTE WALKER 

WITH ALL STAR CAST 

“EVE in EXILE” 



VIOLET PALMER 


LEADS 

/ 

ADDRESS : WID’S DAILY, HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 
















George Fitzmaurice 

Cry of the Weak 
Our Better Selves 
The Narrow Path 
Japanese Nightengale 
Common Clay 
The Avalanche 
Profiteers 
A Society Exile 

Emmett J. Flynn 
Bachelor’s Wife 
Bondage of Barbara 
Racing Strain 
Virtuous Sinners 
Yvonne from Paris 

Hugh Ford 

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch 

Secret Garden 
Woman Thou Gavest Me 

Jack Ford 

Bare Fists 
Ace of the Saddle 
Outcasts of Poker Flat 
Fight for Love 
Roped 

Three Mounted Men 

Harry L. Franklin 
Sylvia on a Spree 
Johnny on the Spot 
That’s Good 
Full of Pep 
After His Own Heart 
In His Brothers Place 
Four Flusher 

S. A. Franklin 
Fan Fan 
Probation Wife 
Heart of Wetona 
Forbidden City 
Ali Baba and the Forty 
Thieves 

Francis Ford 
The Craving 
Silent Mystery 
Riders of Vengeance 

Park Frame 
Mint of Hell 

Man Who Turned White 
White-Washed Walls 
Pagan God 

j. J. Franz 

Bare Fisted Gallagher 
Sage Brush Hamlet 

Harry Gant 

Sage-Brush League 

Burton George 

Ginger 

Douglas Gerrard 
Velvet Hand 
Sealed Envelope 
Cabaret Girl 

Charles Giblyn 

Up Stairs and Down 
Perfect 36 
Peck’s Bad Girl 
Just for Tonight 
Spite Bride 

Arvid Gillstrom 

Smiles 

Swat the Spy 

Tell It to the Marines 

Joseph Gleason 

Miss Dulcie from Dixie 
Fortune’s Child 
Beloved Imposter 

Sidney M. Golden 
Mysterious Mr. Browning 

Francis J. Grandon 
Wild Honey 
Modern Husbands 
Love’s Law 
Lamb and the Lion 
Conquered Hearts 
Lieut. E. H. Griffith 
Fit to Win 


D. W. Griffith 

True Heart Susie 
Romance of Happy Valley 
Greatest Thing in Life 
Girl Who Stayed at Home 
Broken Blossoms 
Fall of Babylon 
Mother and the Law 

Gilbert P. Hamilton 

Open Your Eyes 
Coax Me 

Jesse D. Hampton 

What Every Woman Wants 
The Drifters 
End of the Game 
Prisoners of the Pine 

Carl Harbaugh 

Marriages Are Made 
Other Man’s Wife 

Neal Hart 

When the Desert Smiled 
William S. Hart 

Square Deal Sanderson 
Poppy Girl’s Husband 
Money Corral 
Border Wirless 
Branding Broadway 
Breed of Men 

David M. Hartford 
Man of Bronze 

John Joseph Harvey 

Kaiser’s Finish 

Thomas N. Heffron 

Tony America 

Prodigal Liar 

Mask of Riches 

Life’s A Funny Proposition 

Deuce Duncan 

Best Man 

A Man’s Fight 

Dell Henderson 

By Hook or Crook 
Courage for Two 
Hit or Miss 
Love in a Hurry 
Road to France 
Social Pirate 
3 Green Eyes 
Hobart Henley 
Too Fat to Fight 
Woman on the Index 
One Week of Life 
Laughing Bill Hyde 
Howard Hickman 
White Lie 
Her Purchase Price 
Trick of Fate 
• Tangled Threads 
Joselyn’s Wife 
Hearts Asleep 
All of a Sudden Norma 
Two Gun Betty 
Lambert Hillyer 
Wagon Tracks 
Square Deal Sanderson 

J. K. Holbrook 

Commercial Pirates 
Edwin L. Hollywood 
Challenge Accepted 

Allen Holubar 

Talk of the Town 
Heart of Humanity 
Paid in Advance 
The Right to Happiness 

Arthur Hopkins 

Eternal Magdalene 
E. Mason Hopper 

As the Sun Went Down 
Come Again Smith 
Wife or Country 
Mystic Face 
Love’s Pay Day 

Chas. Horan 

Black Eyes 

Harry O. Hoyt 

Through the Toils 
Hand Invisible 
Broadway Saint 


Henry Houry 

Miss Ambition 
Daring Hearts 

Elliot Howe 

Todd of the Times 

T. Hayes Hunter 

Desert Gold 
Once to Every Man 

John Ince 

Secret Strings 
One-Thing-at-a-Time O’Day 
Blind Man’s Eyes 
Blackie’s Redemption 
Favor to a Friend 

Ralph Ince 

Virtuous Men 
From Headquarters 
Painted World 
Panther Woman 
Stitch in Time 
Too Many Crooks 
Two Women 
Perfect Lover 
Lloyd Ingraham 
Man’s Desire 
Amazing Imposter 
Eyes of Julia Deep 
Intrusion of Isabel 
Rosemary Climbs the 
Heights 

Wives and Other Wives 
Harris Ingraham 
Child of M’ sieu 
Unto the End 
George Irving 
As a Man Thinks 
Hidden Fires 
Silver King 
The Volcano 

Lorimer Johnson 
Breezy Jim 
Devil McCare 

Xefft Johnson 

Home Wanted 
Love and the Woman 
Love Defender 
Love Net 

Richard Jones 

Yankee Doodle in Berlin 

Edward Jose 
Fires of Faith 
My Cousin 
Private Peat 
Two Brides 
Woman of Impulse 
Rupert Julian 
Creaking Stairs 
Sleeping Lion 
Fire Flingers 
Millionaire Pirate 
Maxwell Karger 
Silent Woman 
Kildare or the Storm 
Frank Keenan 
Silver Girl 
Burton King 
Treason 
Reckoning Day 

Henry King 

Where the West Begins 
When a Man Rides Alone 
Some Liar 
Hobbs in a Hurry 
Brass Buttons 
All the World to Nothing 
Sporting Chance 
This Hero Stuff 
Six Feet Four 
Frank Gordon Kirby 
Price of Innocence 

James Kirkwood 
Over There 
Out of the Night 
Marriage 
In Wrong 
I Want to Forget 
Bill Apperson’s Boy 


Harley Knoles 
Little Women 
Bolshevism on Trial 


Henry Kolker 

Woman Michael Married 

Henri Krauss 

Vagabond of France 


Edmund Lawrence 

Love Auction 
Queen of Hearts 
Window Opposite 
Cheating Herself 

John S. Lawrence 

Scarlet Trail 


Robert Leonard 

Danger—Go Slow 
Big Little Person 
Delicious Little Devil 
Modern Love 
Scarlet Trail 
What Am I Bid 
Way of a Woman 


Edward J Le Saint 

Call of the Soul 


Kultur 
The Sneak . 
Strange Woman 
Wilderness Trail 


•ank Lloyd 

The Man Hunter 
For Freedom 


'^L^Tthe Children 
Ira M. Lowry 

For h ti^°Freedom of the East 
Oh Johnny 
Speedy Meade 
Road Called Straight 

Wilfred Lucas „ „„ 

Testing of Mildred Vane 

O. A. C. Lund 

Nature Girl 
Together 

Norval MacGregor 

Children of Banishment 
Jacques of the Silver North 

Charles Maigne 
The Firing Line 
Her Great Chance 
Indestructible Wife 

In the Hollow of Her Hand 
Redhead 

World to Live In 

Theodore Marsto* 

Beyond the Law 

Louis Mercanton 
Infatuation 

G £r r Se M of?J? Mfk.-B.li." 
Good Gracious Annabelle 
Jane Goes A-Wooing 
Men, Women and Money 
Pettigrew’s Girl 
«....i. i t.uHo Pirate 


George E. Middleton 
Just Squaw 


r Millarde 
ght in the Act 
inie Annie Laurie 
nbling in Souls 
1 With No Regrets 


Ashley Miller 

Made in America 
Why Germany Must Pay 





Frohman 

Amusement Corporation 

PRESENTS 

MACK SWAIN 

IN 

Poppy Comedies 



Pauline Frederick 
Madge Kennedy 
Mabel Normand 
Mary Miles Minter 
Marguerite Clark 
Olive Thomas 
Bessie Love 
Mae Marsh 


Wallace MacDonald 

LEADING MAN 

PERMANENT ADDRESS:- 



LOS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

























































Tom Mills 

Thin Ice 

Unknown Quantity- 
Girl at Bay 
Girl Woman 

Howard M. Mitchell 

Law That Divides 
Splendid Sin 


Eugene Moore 

Sue of the South 


Edmund Mortimer 

Road Through the Dark 


Marshall Neilan 

Daddy Long Legs 
Heart of the Wilds 
Out of a Clear Sky 
Three Men and a Girl 
Unpardonable Sin 

R. Wm. Neill 
Charge It to Me 
Puppy Love 
Trixie From Broadway 
Vive La France 
Career of Katherine Bush 


Fred Niblo 

Fuss and Feathers 
Happy Though Married 
Haunted Bedroom 
Law of Men 
When Do We Eat 
Partners Three 
Virtuous Thief 

William Nigh 

Our Teddy 

John E. O’Brien 

Bishop’s Emeralds 

Sidney Olcott 

Marriage for Convenience 

Henry Otto 
The Microbe 
Amateur Adventuress 
Angel Child 
Great Romance 
Island of Intrigue 
Some Bride 

Ida May Park 

Amazing Wife 
Vanity Pool 

William Parke 

Key to Power 

Albert Parker 

Arizona 

Knickerbocker Buckaroo 
Secret Code 
Giovani Pastrone 
The Liberator 


Stuart Paton 

Border Raiders 
Devil’s Trail 
Little Diplomat 


Frank Reicher 

Suspense 
Prodigal Wife 
American Way 
The Battler 
The Trap 

Lvnn Reynolds 

Treat ’Em Rough 
Rebellious Bride 
Mr. Logan, U. S. A. 

Miss Adventure 
Forbidden Room 
Fame and Fortune 
Little Brother of the Rich 
Brute Breaker 

Thomas Ricketts 
Sins of the World 

George Ridgewell 
Water Lily 
Root of Evil 

John S. Robertson 

Here Comes the Bride 

Little Miss Hoover 

Girl of Today 

Come Out of the Kitchen 

Better Half 

Test of Honor 

Let’s Elope 

Make Believe Wife 

Misleading Widow 

Arthur Rosson 

Successful Failure 
Sahara 

Married in Haste 
Coming of the Law 
Rough Riding Romance 

Paul Scardon 

P.eating the Odds 
Beauty Proof 
Fighting Destiny 
Green God 
Man Who Won 
Hoarded Assets 
King of Diamonds 
Silent Strength 
The Gamblers 

Victor L. Schertzinger 
Hard Boiled 
Home Breaker 
Lady of Red Butte 
Other Men’s Wives 
Sheriff’s Son 
String Beans 
Extravagance 
Quicksand 
Upstairs 

Peace of Roaring River 

Abraham S. Schomer 
Ruling Passion 

William Shaudet 

Finger of Justice 

George Selgmann 
Spitfire of Seville 
Woman Under Cover 


Leonce Perret 

Lafayette We Come 
Soul Adrift 
Unknown Love 
The Thirteenth Chair 

George Peterson 
Better ’Ole 


Edward Sloman 

Fair Enough 
Mantle of Charity 
Molly of the Follies 
Monev Isn’t Everything 
Put Up Tour Hands 
Sandy Burke of the U-Bar-U 
The Westerners 


Wray Physioc 
Human Clay 
Joseph Pintus 
Colonel Bridau 
George Foster Platt 
Deliverance 

Frank Powell 

Unbroken Promise 
Forfeit 


Paul Powell 

Blinding Trail 
All Night 

Little White Savage 
Society of Sensation 
Weaker Vessel 
Who Will Marry Me 
Man in the Moonlight 


Harry Revier 

What Shall We Do With Him 
Challenge of Chance 


Cliff Smith 

The Pretender 
Silent Rider 
Untamed 

David Smith 

By the World Forgot 
Enchanted Barn 
Wishing Ring Man 
Yankee Princess 
Cupid Forecloses 

John M. Stahl 

Her Code of Honor 
Suspicion 

Woman Under Oath 
Richard Stanton 
Caillaux Case 
Jungle Trail 
Land of the Free 
Why America Will Wm 
Why I Would Not Marry 
Checkers 


Richard M. Stahl 

What Becomes 


of the Child¬ 


ren 


Julius Steger 
Her Mistake 
Hidden Truth 
Burden of Proof 
Belle of New York 

Rollin Sturgeon 

Destiny 

Hugon the Mighty 
Pretty Smooth 
Sundown Trail 

Jerome Storm 
The Busher 
Girl Dodger 
Greased Lightning 
Hay Foot, Straw Foot 
Bili Henry 

Frederick Sullivan 
Solitary Sin 

Charles Swickard 
Almost Married 
Faith 

Hitting the High Spots 
Light of Western Stars 
The Spender 

William D. Taylor 
Captain Kidd, Jr. 
Johanna Enlists 

Tom Terriss 

Third Degree 
Spark Divine 
Lion and the Mouse 
Everybody’s Girl 
Cambric Mask 
Captain’s Captain 

Otis B. Thayer 

Miss Arizona 

Frederic Thomson 

Nymph of the Woods 
The Mating 

Robert Thornby 

When My Ship Comes In 
Are You Legally Married 
Carolyn of the Corners 
Her Inspiration 

Martin Thornton 

Romany Lass 

Maurice Tourneur 

Woman 

White Heather 
Sporting Life 
My Lady’s Garter 

Ernest Trailer 

Caleb Piper’s Girl 
Go Get ’Em Garrity 


Robert Vignola 


Girl Who Came Back 
Experimental Marriage 
Home Town Girl 


Woman Next Door 

Winning Girl 

An Innocent Adventuress 

Women’s Weapons 

Louisiana 

Heart of Youth 

The Third Kiss 


R. A. Walsh 

Every Mother’s Son 
On the Jump 
Evangeline 

Ernest C. Warde 

Gates of Brass 
The Bells 
Man In the Open 
Master Man 
Midnight Stage 
World Aflame 
White Man’s Chance 


Edward Warren 

Thunderbolts of Fate 


Kenneth Webb 
Adventure Shop 
Girl Problem 


HT o T»i D T,tfl . 


Lois Weber 

Borrowed Clothes 
Mary Regan 
Midnight Romance 


Irvin V. Willat 

False Faces 
Law of the North 
Midnight Patrol 
Rustling a Bride 
Grim Game 


C. J. Williams 
Some Wild Oats 


Elsie Jane Wilson 
Lure of Luxury 
The Game’s Up 


rrence C. Windom 


Taxi 

Upside Down 


Chester Withey 
Hun Within 
Maggie Pepper 
New Moon 


Lawrence Trimble 

Fool’s Gold 
Spotlight Sadie 

George Loane Tucker 
Virtuous Wives 
Miracle Man 

Jacques Tyrol 
Red Viper 
Human Passions 
And the Children Pay 

Travers Vale 
Heart of Gold 
Zero Hour 

Soul Without Windows 
Quickening Flame 
Moral Deadline 
The Bluffer 
Just Sylvia 
Wallie Van 

Rothapfel’s First Unit Pro¬ 
gramme 

W. S. Van Dyke 

Lady of the Dugout 

Perry Vekroff 
Dust of Desire 
Woman’s Experience 
What Love Forgives 

King W. Vidor 

Better Times 
Turn in the Road 
Other Half 


William Wolbert 

Light of Victory 

Wallace Worsley 
Adele 

Diane of the Green Van 
Playthings of Passion 
Goddess of Lost Lake 

William Worthington 

Gray Horizon 
Man Beneath 
All Wrong 
Bonds of Honor 
Courageous Coward 
Heart in Pawn 
His Birthright 
His Debt 

Harold Bill Wright 
Shepherd of the Hills 


Fames Young 
Gentleman of Quality 
Hornet’s Nest 
Dawn of Understanding 
Temple of Dusk 
The Usurper 
Highest Trump 
Her Country First 
Rogue’s Romance 
Man Who Wouldn’t Tell 
The Wolf 
A Regular Girl 


ELK PHOTOPLAYS, Inc. 

Operating Greater New York , New York State 
and Northern New Jersey 
Released “The Fatal Fortune” ( Serial) 

“ARE YOU LEGALLY MARRIED?” 

15 SHORTY HAMILTON 2-REELS 
RECLAIMED 

FORTY SINGLE REELS TOM MIX 
35 SINGLE REELS VIM COMEDIES 

also 

“SOULS REDEEMED” 

“BERLIN THRU AMERICA” 

LOTS OF OTHER SMALL AND LARGE SUBJECTS 

IN 1917—185 SUBJECTS 
IN 1919—125 SUBJECTS 

KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE ELK 
146 West 46th Street 


? ? 

• • 

DO YOU NEED 

CARBON-TICKETS EXIT SIGNS THUMB TACKS 

DATE STRIPS PERFUMES 
CARBON SAVERS-ELECTRIC FANS or HEATERS 


IN FACT— 

ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING 
FOR THE MOTION PICTURE 
THEATRE 


CALL, HARRISON 8819 — WRITE or SEE 

CENTRAL THEATRE SUPPLY CO. 

220 SO. STATE STREET - CHICAGO, ILL. 








Productions of the Year 


Hiram Abrams—State Rights 


Hearts of Men. 4/13/19 

Argus Photoplay Prod. 

The House Without Children. 8/19 


Arrow Film Corp. 

The Sunset Princess. 

When the Desert Smiled. 

Law of Nature. 

Beyond the Law. 

Commercial Pirates . 

Finger of Justice. 

Fools’ Gold . 

The Mysterious Mr. Browning_ 

Miss Arizona . 


Blackton Productions 

Safe for Democracy. 11/18 

Buffalo Motion Picture Corp. 

The Price of Innocence. 5/11/19 

C. & L. Features—State Rights 

The Scarlet Trail. 12/19 

Samuel Cummings—State Rights 

Some Wild Oats. 7/19 

Boo-Lee Film Exchange—State Rights 

His Daughter Pays.. 4/15/19 

Educational Film Corp. 

The Key to Power.12/15/18 

Entente Film Co.—State Rights 
Colonel Brideau . 7/7/19 

Exhibitors-Mutual Distr. Corp. 

His Birthright . 9/8/18 

Love’s Law . 9/15/18 

Treason .9/29/18 

The Daredevil .11/10/18 

Lafayette, We Come.11/17/18 

Girl of My Dreams.12/22/18 

And a Still Small Voice.12/29/18 

All of a Sudden Norma. 1/5/19 

Hoop-La . 1/12/19 

Bonds of Honor. 1/19/19 

Life’s a Funny Proposition. 1/26/19 

The Prodigal Liar. 1/30/19 

Diane of the Green Van. 2/2/19 

A Heart in Pawn. 2/9/19 

A Trick of Fate . 2/16/19 

What Every Woman Wants. 2/23/19 

A Long Lane’s Turning.2/23/19 

Hearts Asleep . 3/2/19 

The Turn in the Roau. 3/9/19 

White Washed Walls. 3/16/1'-' 

Lamb and the Lion. 3/23/19 

Modern Husbands . 4/19 

Courageous Coward . 4/19 

Temple of Dusk. 4/19 

Love Call . 4/19 

His Debt . 5/19 

Mint of Hell. 5 /ls 

Joselyn’s Wife . 5/19 

Just Squaw . 5/19 

Bare Fisted Gallagher. 6/19 

Better Times . 6/19 

Man Who Turned White. 6/19 

Tangled Threads . 6/lh 

In Search of Arcady. 6/19 

Man Beneath . 7/19 

Man’s Country .,. 7/19 

Man’s Desire . 7/lt) 

Pagon God . 7/19 

Woman Michael Married. 7/19 

Dead Line . 8/19 

Gray Plorizon . 8/19 

Sage Brush Hamlet. 8/19 

Her Purchase Price. 8/lu 

The Other Half. 8/19 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

Sporting Life . 9/18 

Heart of the Wilds. 9/1/18 

Hun Within . 9/8/18 

Girl Who Came Back. 9/8/18 

Cruise of the Make Believe. 9/8/18 

Johanna Enlists . 9/15/18 

Vive La France. 9/15/18 

Out of a Clear Sky.•;.9/15/18 

Her Country First. 9/22/18 

Embarrassment of Riches. 9/22/18 

The Goat . 9/22/18 

Come On In. 9/22/15 

Law of the North. 9/29/18 

Woman of Impulse. 9/29/18 

He Comes Up Smiling. 9/29/18 

Border Wireless . 10/6/18 

Battling Jane . 10/6/18 

Man from Funeral Range . 10/6A» 

When Do We Eat..-.10/13/18 

Private Peat .10/13/18 


Such a Little Pirate. . .10/13/18 

My Cousin .11/17/18 

Make-Believe Wife .11/17/18 

Gypsey Trail .11/17/18 

Woman’s Weapons .11/24/18 

Mirandy Smiles .11/24/18 

Daughter of the Old South.11/24/18 

Under the Greenwood Tree. 12/1/18 

Fuss and Feathers . 12/1/18 

Too Many Millions. 12/8/18 

Greatest Thing in Life. 12/8/18 

Arizona . 12/8/18 

Squaw Man .12/15/18 

Good Bye Bill.12/15/18 

Branding Broadway .12/15/18 

Quicksand .12/22/18 

String Beans .12/22/18 

Mystery Girl .12/22/18 

The Hope Chest.12/29/18 

Little Miss Hoover.12/29/18 

The Way of a Man with a Maid.. 12/29/18 

Jane Goes A-Wooing . 1/5/19 

Little Women . 1/5/19 

Out of the Shadow. 1/5/19 

Secret Garden . 1/12/19 

Under the Top. 1/12/19 

Here Comes the Bride. 1/19/19 

The Dub .-. 1/19/19 

Romance of Happy Valley. 1/26/19 

Venus in the East. 1/26/19 

Don't Change Tour Husband. 1/26/19 

Hard Boiled . 2/2/19 

Happy Though Married.. 2/2/19 

Breed of Men. 2/2/19 

You Never Saw Such a Girl. 2/9/19 

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch 2/9/19 

Two Brides . 2/9/19 

Girl Dodger . 2/9/19 

Boots . 2/16/19 

Winning Girl . 2/23/19 

Partners Three . 2/23/19 

Maggie Pepper . 2/23/19 

Puppy Love . 3/2/19 

Good Gracious Annabelle. 3/2/19 

Alias Mike Moran. 3/2/19 

Johnny Get Your Gun. 3/9/19 

Poor Boob . 3/9/19 

Marriage Price . 3/9/19 

Poppy Girl’s Husband. 3/16/19 

Three Men and a Girl. 3/16/19 

Extravagance . 3/16/19 

Sheriff’s Son . 3/23/19 

Pettigrew’s Girl . 3/23/19 

Man Who Stayed at Home. 3/23/19 

Little Comrade . 3/30/19 

Peppy Polly . 3/30/19 

Paid in Full. 3/30/19 

Rescuing Angel . 4/6/19 

Test of Honor. 4/6/19 

Silver King . 4/6/19 

Captain Kidd, Jr. 4/6/19 

Let’s Elope . 4/13/19 

Something to Do. 4/13/19 

Knickerbocker Buckaroo . 4/13/19 

Money Corral . 4/20/19 

Home Breaker . 4/20/19 

Greased Lightning . 4/20/19 

Eyes of the Soul. 4/20/lb 

Rustling a Bride.. 4/27/19 

Law of Men. 4/27/19 

Roaring Road . 4/27/19 

Women Next Door. 5/4/19 

Oh You Women. 5/4/19 

Come Out of the Kitchen. 5/11/19 

Home Town Girl. 5/11/19 

White Heather . 5/11/19 

Lady of Red Butte. 5/18/19 

Final Close-Up . 5/18/19 

The Busher . 5/18/lb 

I’ll Get Him Yet. 5/25/19 

True Heart Susie. 5/25/lu 

Haunted Bedroom . 5/25/19 

Putting It Over.... -.... 6/1/19 

Splendid Romance . 6/1/19 

You’re Fired . 6/8/19 

Square Deal Sanderson. 6/8/19 

An Innocent Adventuress. 6/8/19 

Secret Service . 6/15/19 

Other Men’s Wives. 6/15/19 

Men Women and Money. 6/15/19 

Hay Foot Straw Foot. 6/22/19 

Daughter of the Wolf. 6/22/19 

The Avalanche . 6/22/19 

Woman Thou Gavest Me. 6/29/19 

Rose of Granada. 0/29A9 

Stepping Out . 6/29/19 

Girls . 6/29/19 


A Very Good Young Man. 7/6/19 

The Firing Line. 7/6/19 

Nugget Nell . 7/13/19 

Love Burglar . 7/13/19 

Career of Katherine Bush. 7/13/19 

Fires of Faith. 8/3/19 

Dark Star . 8/3/19 

Bill Henry ... 8/10/19 

Virtuous Thief . 8/10/19 

Love Insurance . 8/17/19 

A Society Exile. 8/17/19 

Out of Luck. 8/24/19 

The Heart of Youth. 8/24/19 

Witness for the Defense.8/31/19 

Valley of the Giants. 8/31/19 

Misleading Widow . 9/7/19 

Miracle Man .9/14/19 

The Third Kiss. 9/14/19 

Told in the Hills. 9/21/19 

Film Clearing House 

A Woman’s Experience. 9/18 

Red Blood and Yellow. 10/18 

Marriage .. 11/18 

Wild Honey . 12/18 

Her Mistake . 12/18 

Life’s Greatest Problem. 12/18 

Wanted for Murder. 12/18 

Twilight ... 2/19 

Marriage for Convenience. 2/19 

Love and the Law. 3/19 

Suspense . 3/19 

When A Woman Strikes. 4/19 

When My Ship Comes In. 4Ab 

A House Divided. 4/J.9 

Calibre 38 . 4/19 

Rothapfel’s First Unit Program. 5/19 

Challenge of Chance. 6/19 

Other Man’s Wife. 6/19 

Troop Train .. 

Son of a Gun. . 

Littlest Scout . . 


Film Market, Inc. 

Suspicion . — 

What Becomes of the Children... — 

Who Shall Take My Life. — 

Romance of the Air. — 

Beware of Strangers. — 

City of Purple Dreams. — 

First National Exhibitors Circuit 


Romance of Tarzan. 9/3/18 

Virtuous Wives . 9/15/18 

Shoulder Arms . 9/20/18 

Panther Woman . 10/1/18 

Our Teddy . 2/3/19 

Midnight Romance . 3/19 

Daddy Long Legs. 5/19 

Mary Regan . 5/19 

Auction of Souls. 5/19 

Sunnyside . 6/21/19 

Bill Apperson’s Boy. 6/23/19 

Burglar by Proxy. 8/25/19 

Choosing a Wife. 8/17/19 

Whom the Gods Destroy. . 

Fox Film Corp. 

Bonnie Annie Laurie. 9/1/1S 

Riders of the Purple Sage. 9AA» 

Kultur . 9/8/18 

Land of the Free . 9/8/18 

Mr. Logan, U. S. A. 9/8/18 

Splendid Sin . 9/15/18 

Queen of Hearts. 9/15/18 

Caillaux Case . 9/15/18 

Why America Will Win. 9/22/18 

Swat the Spy. 9/29/18 

Why I Would Not Marry. 9/29/18 

On the Jump. 10/6/18 

Marriages Are Made.10/13/18 

Salome .10/20/18 

Rainbow Trail .10/27/18 

When a Woman Sins . 10/27/18 

Fan Fan .11/17/19 

Tell It to the Marines.11/17/18 

Woman Who Gave .11/17/18 

Fame and Fortune.11/24/18 

Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. .11/24/18 

A Fight for Gold.11/24/18 

The She Devil. 12/1/18 

Buchanan’s Wife . 12/1/18 

Strange Woman . 12/8/18 

I Want to Forget.12/15/18 

Caught in the Act.12/15/18 

Every Mother’s Son.12/15A8 

I’ll Say So.12/22/18 




























































































































































































































































































Frank Reicher 

Director of 

DRAMATIC PRODUCTIONS 










For Freedom .12/29/18 

Danger Zone .12/29/18 

Treat ’Em Rough. 1/5/19 

The Light . 1/12/19 

Call of the Soul. 1/19/19 

Girl with No Regrets. 1/26/19 

Woman, Woman . 1/26/19 

Luck and Pluck. 2/2A9 

Love Auction . 2/9/19 

The Man Hunter. 2/9/19 

Hell Roarin’ Reform. 2/16/19 

Smiles . 2/23/19 

Siren’s Song . 2/23/19 

The Forbidden Room. 3/2/19 

Gambling in Souls. 3/9/19 

When Men Desire. 3/9/19 

Never Say Quit. 3/16/19 

Rebellious Bride . 3/23/19 

Thou Shalt Not. 3/23/19 

Married in Haste. 4/6/19 

Pitfalls of a Big City. 4/13/19 

Love That Dares. 4/20/19 

Help, Help, Police.4/27/19 

Miss Adventure . 5/4/19 

Coming of the Law. 5/11/19 

Words and Music. 5/18/19 

The Divorce Trap. 5/25/19 

Jungle Trail . 6/1/19 

When Fate Decides. 6/1/19 

Putting One Over. 6/8/19 

A Woman There Was. 6/15/19 

Cowardice Court . 6/15/19 

Wilderness Trail . 6/22/19 

Lone Star Ranger. 6/29/19 

Be A Little Sport. 6/29/19 

My Little Sister. 6/29/19 

Rose of the West. 7/20/19 

The Sneak . 7/27/19 

The Seventh Person. 8/3/19 

Cheating Herself . 8/3/19 

Love Is Love. 8/17/19 

Wolves of the Night. 8/10/19 

Rough Riding Romance.8/24/19 

Checkers . 8/31/19 

( as ng Rainbows . 9/31/19 

Winning Stroke . 9/7/19 

Broken Commandments .9/14/19 

Evangeline . 9/21/19 

Froliman Amusement Co. 

Once to Every Man. 2/9/19 

Harry Garson—State Rights 

Unpardonable Sin . 3/19 

Hushed Hour . 9/19 

Goldwyn Pictures Corp. 

The Turn of the Wheel . 9/2/18 

Peck’s Bad Girl. 9/9/18 

Just for Tonight. 9/16/i8 

Kingdom of Youth. 9/23/19 

Laughing Bill Hyde. 9/30/19 

Hidden Fires . 10/7/18 

Thirty a Week.11/17/18 

Hell Cat . 12/1/18 

Perfect Lady . 12/8/19 

Racing Strain .12/22/18 

Too Fat to Fight.12/15/18 

Oh Johnny .12/22/18 

Go West Young Man.12/29/18 

Day Dreams . 1/12/18 

Shadows . 1/26/19 

For the Freedom of the East. 1/19 

Bondage of Barbara. 2/2/19 

Sis Hopkins . 2/9/19 

Sandy Burke of the U-Bar-U.2/23/19 

The Brand . 3/9/19 

A Man and His Money. 3/16/19 

The Woman on the Index.3/23/19 

Spotlight Sadie . 3/30/19 

Daughter of Mine. 3/30/19 

One Week of Life. 4/13/19 

The Road Called Straight. 4/20/19 

The Pest . 4/27/19 

The Stronger Vow. 4/27/la 

One of the Finest. 5/4/19 

Leave It to Susan. 5/11/19 

Crimson Gardenia . 5/18/19 

When Doctors Disagree.5/25/19 

The Eternal Magdalene. 5/19 

Fear Woman . 6/1/19 

i City of Comrades. 6/22/19 

Through the Wrong Door. 7/6/19 

Peace of Roaring River. 7/27/19 

Upstairs . 8/3/19 

Lord and Lady Algy. 8/19 

High Pockets . 8/15/19 

* Heartsease .8/17/19 

Girl from Outside....,. 8/24/19 

Graphic Pictures Corp. 

Ashes of Love. 10/18 

Echo of Youth. 2/19 


D. W. Griffith 


Fall of Babylon. 8/19 

Harma Photoplay Corp.—State Rights 

Romany Lass . 4/19 

J. Frank Hatch 

Tempest and Sunshine. . 

Hiller & Wilk—State Rights 

Woman . 11/18 

Silent Mystery . 12/18 

W. W. Hodklnson Corp. 

The White Lie. 9/2/18 

Whatever the Cost. 9/9/18 

Angel Child . 9/9/18 

Prisoner of the Pines. 9/16/ls 

Heart of Rachael. 9/30/19 

Three X Gordon. 11/25/18 

Goddess of Lost Lake. 12/2/18 

Two Gun Betty.12/16/18 

Challenge Accepted .12/23/18 

The Drifters . 1/6/19 

Law That Divides. 1/20/19 

Fighting Through . 1/27/19 

Come Again Smith . 2/10/19 

Made in America. 2/16/19 

Love Hunger . 2/24/19 

The Forfeit . 3/10/19 

Sahara . 3/19 

End of the Game. 3/24/19 

Thunderbolts of Fate. 4/6/19 

As a Man Thinks. 4/19 

Best Man . 4/19 

A White Man’s Chance. 8/19 

The Volcano . 8/ta 

The Westerners . 8/19 

Blue Bonnet . . 

You Never Know Your Luck. . 

Desert Gold . . 


Ivan Pictures—State Rights 


Window Opposite . 5/1/19 

Human Clay . . 

Life of Honor. . 

Victor Kremer 

Denny from Ireland. 7/1/19 

The Ranger . 7/15/19 

The Snail . 7/15/19 

The Pen Vulture. 8/13/19 

When Arizona Won. 8/27/19 

Stripped for a Million. . 


•lames Keane—State Rights 

The Spreading Evil. 

Sol Lesser—State Rights 


Yankee Doodle in Berlin. 4/19 

The McManus Corp.—State Rights 
The Lost Battalion. 7/19 

Metro Pictures Corp. 

The Silent Woman. 9/2/18 

Kildare of the Storm. 9/16/18 

The Return of Mary.9/23/18 

Unexpected Places . 9/30/18 

Secret Strings . 10/7/18 

Pals First . 10/18 

His Bonded Wife.11/18/18 

Five Thousand an Hour.11/25/18 

The Testin gof Mildred Vane.... 12/2/18 

Hitting the High Spots. 12/9/18 

Sylvia on a Spree.12/16/18 

The Poor Rich Man.12/23/18 

Her Inspiration .12/30/18 

Eye for Eye. 12/18 

The Great Victory. 1/4/19 

The Gold Cure. 1/6/19 

The Spender . 1/6/19 

In for Thirty Days. 1/27/19 

Great Romance . 1/19 

Why Germany Must Pay. 1/19 

Shadows of Suspicion. 2/19 

Faith . 2/3/19 

As the Sun Went Down. 2/10/18 

Johnny on the Spot.2/17/19 

Peggy Does Her Darndest.2/24/19 

Out of the Fob. 2/19 

Satan Junior . 3/3/19 

Blind Man's Eyes. 3/10/19 

The Way of the Strong.3/17/19 

That’s Good . 3/24/19 

Jeanne of the Gutter. 3/31/19 

The Island of Intrigue. 4/7/19 

Blackie’s Redemption .4/14/19 

The Red Lantern. 4/19 

A Man of Honor. 5/3/19 

After His Own Heart. 5/5/19 

An Amateur Adventuress. 5/5/19 

Castles in the Air. 5/12/19 

The Lions’ Den.5/19/19 

Full of Pep. 5/26/19 



Almost Married . 6/2/19 

Some Bride . 6/9/19 

The Family Tree. 6/16/19 

Fools and Their Money.6/16/19 

One Thing at a Time O’Day. 6/23/19 

The Uplifters . 6/30/19 

The Man Who Tayed at ITome.... 6/19 

God’s Outlaw . 7/7/19 

His Brother’s Place. 7/14/19 

The Microbe . 7/21/19 

The Belle of the Season.7/28/19 

Easy to Make Money. a/4/19 1 

A Favor to a Friend.8/11/19 

The Four Flusher. 8/18/lSr 

The Brat . 8/19 

Pathe Exchange, Inc. 

The Eyes of Julia Deep.9/15/18 

A Japanese Nightingale.9/22/18 

Money Isn’t Everything.9/29/18 

Hobbs in a Hurry. 10/6/18 

The Border Raiders. 10/6/18 

Rosemary Climbs the Heights... .10/13/18 

The Bells .11/17/18 

The Mantle of Charity.11/24/18 

Milady o’ the Beanstaix. 12/1/18 

Infatuation . 12/1/18 

All the World to Nothing. 12/8/18 

The Narrow Path.12/15/18 

Wives and Other Wives.12/22/18 

Dolly’s Vacation .12/29/18 

Fair Enough . 1/1/19 

The Midnight Stage. 1/12/19 

When A Man Rides Alone. 1/10/10 

The Vagabond of France. 1/26/19 

The Amazing Imposter. 2/2/19 

Todd of the Times. 2/9/19 

Molly of the Follies. 2/16/19 

The Old Maid’s Baby. 2/23/19' 

Common Clay . 3/2/19' 

Carolyn of the Corners. 3/9/19 

Where the West Begins. 3/16/19 

Go Get ’Em Garringer. 3/23/19 

Brass Buttons . 3/30/19 

Put Up Your Hands. 3/19 

The Silver Girl . 4/6/19 

The Intrusion of Isabel.4/13/19 

The Sawdust Doll. 4/20/19 

The Unknown Love. 4 / 27/19 

Charge It to Me. 5/4/19 

The Cry of the Weak. 5/4/19 

Our Better Selves. 5/4/19 

Caleb Piper’s Girl. 5/18/19 

Some Liar . 5/18/19 

Mary O’Rourk . 5/19/19 

The Master Man .5/25/19 

All Wrong . 6/1/19 

A Bachelor’s Wife. 6/1/19 

The Bishop’s Emeralds. 6/15/19 

The Tattle Diplomat. 6 / 15/19 

Trixie from Broadway .6/15/19 

Soul Adrift . 6/15/19 

Oh Boy . 6/22/19 

The Profiteers . 6/29/19 

Sporting Chance . 6/29/19 

Gates of Brass. 7/6/19 

Yvonne from Paris. 7/13/19 

Tiger Lily . 7/27/19 

The World Aflame. 8/7/19 

This Hero Stuff. 8/10/19 

The Love Cheat. 8/24/19 

The Thirteenth Chair. 8/31/19 


Pioneer Film Corp.—State Rights 

Virtuous Sinners . — 

Sins of the Children. — 

Lady of the Du gout. — 

Little Orphant Annie . — 

Long Arm of Mannister. — 

The Boomerang . — 

The Girl from Nowhere. — 

Public Health Film—State Rights 


Fit to Win. 4/13A9 

Harry Raver—State Rights 
The Liberator . 12/18 • 

Rialto De Luxe 

Conquered Hearts . 11/18 

Romayne Superfilms 

Sage-Brush League . 8/1/19 

Schomer Productions 
Ruling Passions . 9/18 

Screencraft 

The Prodigal Wife. 12/18 




















































































































































































































































































Emerson-Loos 

» 

Productions 



ANITA LOOS 


JOHN EMERSON 


FOR CONSTANCE TALMADGE: 

“A Temperamental Wife,” “The Virtuous Vamp” and 

“In Search of a Sinner” 


FOR PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT: 
“Come On In” and “Oh, You Women” 


FOR NORMA TALMADGE: 
“The Social Secretary” 


FOR DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS: 
“Reaching for the Moon,” “The Americano,” “Down to 
Earth,” “His Picture in the Papers,” “Wild and 
Woolly,” “In Again—Out Again.” 


Address 

130 WEST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 




















Select Pictures 

Better Half . 9/18 

Burden of Proof. 9/18 

Mrs. Leffingwell’s Boots. 9/18 

The Forbidden City. 10/18 

The One Woman. 10/18 

The Cavell Case. 11/18 

Her Great Chance. 11/18 

The Road Through the Dark. 11/18 

The Code of the Yukon. 12/18 

The Heart of Wetona. 12/18 

The Midnight Patrol. 12/18 

In the Hollow of Her Hand. 12/18 

A Lady’s Name. 12/18 

Cheating Cheaters . 1/19 

Who Cares . 1/19 

Children of Banishment. 2/19 

The Hidden Truth. 2/19 

The World to Live In. 2/19 

Romance and Arabella. 2/19 

The Belle of New York. 2/lu 

Experimental Marriage . 3/19 

Marie Ltd. 3/19 

The Probation Wife. 3/19 

Bolshevism on Trial. 4/19 

Getting Mary Married. 4/19 

The Veiled Adventure. 4/19 

Red Head . 4/19 

Break the New to Mother. 5/19 

The New Moon. 5/19 

Jacques of the Silver North. 5/19 

Happiness A La Mode. .6/19 

Upstairs and Down. 6/19 

The Better Wife. 7/19 

His Bridal Night. 7/19 

The Way of a Woman. 7/19 

The Indestructible Wife. 7/19 

Over There . 8/19 

The Perfect Lover. 8/19 

The Spite Bride. 8/19 

Love or Fame. 9/19 

The Country Cousin. 9/19 

Ernest Shipman—State Rights 

Mother I Need You. 10/18 

Tiger of the Sea..... . 

Shuberts 

(Distribution unsettled Sept. 1) 

Deliverance . 8/24/19 

S. L. Pictures—State Rights 
Virtuous Men . 4/19 

Solitary Sin Corp.—State Rights 

The Solitary Sin. 6/19 

Stoermer Picture Corp.—State Rights 
The Tidal Wave. —- 

Robert Thornby—State Rights 

Are You Legally Married. 4/19 

Triangle Pictures Corp. 

Untamed . 9/1/18 

Mask of Riches. 9/1/18 

The Secret Code. 9/8/18 

Mystic Face . 9/8/18 

The Atom . 9/15/18 

The Desert Law. 9/22/18 

The Grey Parasol. 9/29/18 

Tony America . 10/6/18 

The Pretender .10/13/19 

Reckoning Day .11/17/18 

Deuce Duncan .11/24/18 

Love’s Pay Day. 12/1/18 

The Silent Rider. 12/8/18 

Irish Eyes .12/15/18 

Crown Jewels .12/22/18 

Wife or Country.12/29/18 

A Successful Failure. 1/19/19 

Unto the End. 1/26/19 

Restless Souls . 2/2/19 

Secret Marriage . 2/9/19 

Child of M’sieu. 2/16/19 

Breezy Jim . 2/23/19 

A Wild Goose Chase. 3/2/19 

The Railroaders . 3/9/19 

The Little Rowdy. 3/23/19 

Toton . 3/30/19 

Royal Democrat . 4/6/19 

A Regular Fellow. 4/13/19 

Its’ A Bear. 4/13/19 

Devil McCare . 4/20/19 

Follies Girl . 4/27/19 

Place in the Sun. 5/4/19 

Taxi . 5/11/19 

Water Idly . 5/18/19 

Mayor of Filbert . 5/25/19 

The Root of Evil. 6/1/19 

Love’s Prisoner . 6/8/19 

Lady Windemere’s Fan. 6/15/19 

Upside Down . 6/22/19 

Dombey and Son. /29/19 


Prudence on Broadway . 7/6/19 

Muggsy . 7/13/19 

Mistaken Identity. 7/20/19 

Unbroken Promise . 8/27/19 

1.yon’s Mail . 8/3/19 

Fruits of Passion. 8/10/19 

One Against Many. 8/17/19 

Her Greatest Performance. 8/23/19 

Black Eyes . S/31/19 


Tyrad Pictures—State Rights 

And the Children Pay. 

Your Wife and Mine . 

Red Viper . 

Human Passions . 

United Pictures 


Light of Western Stars. 1/5/19 

A dele . 1/26/19 

Man in the Open. 2/23/19 

Her Code of Honor. 3/8/19 

Sin of the World. 3/19 

Playthings of Passion. 6/8/19 

Man’s Fight . 8/17/19 

Woman Under Oath. 8/19 

Universal Film Mfg. Co. 

Modern Love . 9/9/18 

Brazen Beauty . 9/9/18 

Beans . 9/16/18 

Talk of the Town. 9/23/18 

Society of Sensation. 9/23/18 

The Velvet Hand. 9/30/18 

Three Mounted Men. 10/7/18 

l ure of Luxury. 10/7/18 

Together .10/14/18 

All Night .10/28/18 

The Yellow Dog. 11/4/18 

Hugon the Mightv.11/11/18 

Kiss or Kill.11/11/18 

Borrowed Clothes .11/18/18 

After the War. 12/18 

Tongues of Flame. 12/2/18 

Vanity Pool . 12/9/18 

Danger—Go Slow. 12/6/18 

She Hired a Husband.12/16/18 

The Sea Flower.12/23/18 

Set Free .12/23/18 

The Wildcat of Paris.12/30/18 

The Cabaret Girl.12/30/18 

The Nature Girl. 1/6/19 

The Craving . 1/12/19 

The Game’s Up. 1/19/19 

Roped . 1/26/19 

Who Will Marry Me. 1/26/19 

Sue of the South. 2/3/19 

Creaking Stairs. 2/10/19 

TheSealed Envelope . 2/17/19 

The Little White Savage. 2/24/19 

The Wicked Darling.... 2/24/19 

Millionaire Pirate . 2/19 

Taste of Life . 3/3/19 

The Scarlet Shadow. 3/10/19 

The Light of Victory. 3/17/10 

A Fight for Love . 3/24/10 

A Silk-Lined Burglar. 3/31/19 

The Amazing Wife. 4/7/19 

What Am I Bid. 4/14/19 

The Fire Flingers. 4/21/19 

The Exquisite Thief. 4/28/19 

Pretty Smooth . 5/5/19 

Bare Fists . 5/5/19 

The Delicious Little Devil. 5/12/10 

Blinding Trail . 5/19/19 

'I he Unpainted Woman. 5/26/19 

Destiny . 6/2/19 

A Big Little Person. 6/2/19 

The Sleeping Lion. 6/23/19 

The Weaker Vessel... 6/30/19 

Horae . 7/7/19 

Outcasts of Poker Flat. 7/7/19 

Paid in Advance. 7/7/19 

Little Brother of the Rich. 7/14/19 

The Snitfire of Seville. 7/21/19 

The Man in the Moonlight. 7/28/19 

Loot . 8/19 

The Sundown Trail . 8/19 

The Trap . 8/19 

"When a Girl Loves. . 

The Petal on the Current. 

Act of the Saddle . 8/19 

The Brute Breaker. 8/19 

Vitagraph Company 

The Green God. 9/1/18 

A Nymph of the Woods. 9/8/18 

By the World Forgot. 9/15/18 

A Girl of Today. 4/22/18 

A Diplomatic Mission. 9/30/18 

The Mating . 10/7/18 

The King of Diamonds.10/14/18 

Everybody’s Girl .11/18/19 

Miss Ambition . 11/25/18 

The Dawn of Understanding.... 12/2/19 
The Man Who Wouldn’t Tell_ 12/9/18 


The Beloved Imposter.12/16/18 

Hoarded Assets .12/23/18 

Captain’s Captain.12/30/18 

The Adventure Shop. 1/6/19 

The Common Cause. 1/6/19 

The Enchanted Barn. 1/13/19 

The Highest Trump. 2/2/19 

Fortune’s Child . 2/9/19 

The Lion and the Mouse. 2/19 

Silent Strength . 2/17/19 

The Girl Problem. 3/3/19 

From Headquarters . 3/10/19 

The Wishing Ring Man. 3/10/19 

Gentleman of Quality. 3/17/19 

Miss Dulsie From Dixie. 3/24/19 

Fighting Destiny . 3/31/19 

’The Cambric Mask. 4/7/19 

The Unknown Quantity . 4/14/19 

A Yankee Princess . 4/21/19 

The Usurper . 4/28/19 

Two Women . 4/28/19 

A Stitch in Time. 5/5/19 

Beating the Odds . 5/12/19 

Too Many Crooks. 5/16/19 

Thin Ice . 5/26/19 

The Little Boss. 6/2/19 

A Rogue's Romance . 6/9/19 

The Painted World. 6/16/19 

The Spark Divine. 6/20/19 

Beauty Proof . 6/23/19 

The Man Who Won. 6/30/19 

Girl at Bay . 7/7/19 

The Girl Woman . S/10/19 


The Wolf . 

Shadows of the Past. 

The Hornet’s Nest. 

The Gamblers . 

Bramble Bush . 

Cupid Forecloses . 

Daring Hearts . 

Over the Garden Wall. 

Waldorf Photoplay Corp. 


Where Bonds are Loosed. 8/19 

Warner Bros.—State Rights 

The Kaiser’s Finish .18/15/18 

W. H. Productions—State Rights 

Everybody’s Business . 

World Film Corp. 

The Power and the Glory. 9/2/1S 

Tother Dear Charmer. 9/9/18 

By Hook or Crook. 9/16/18 

To Him That Hath. 9/23/18 

A Soul Without Windows.9/30/18 

The Appearance of Evil. 10/7/18 

The Road to France.10/14/18 

Just Sylvia .10/17/18 

The Grouch . 11/25/18 

The Man of Bronze. 12/9/18 

The Zero Hour. 12/16/18 

Love Net .12/23/18 

The Sea Waif.12/30/18 

Cnder Four Flags. 1/6/19 

What Love Forgives. 1/6/19 

Love in a Hurry.1/13/19 

Heart of Gold . 1/20/19 

The Bluffer . 1/27/19 

The Rough Neck . 2/3/19 

Mandarin’s Gold . 2/10/19 

What Shall We Do With Him?.. 2/10/19 

Courage For Two. 2/17/19 

The Moral Deadline . 2/24/19 

Crook of Dreams. 3/3/19 

The Hand Invisible. 3/10/19 

The Unveiling Hand. 3/10/19 

Hit or Miss. 3/24/19 

The Love Defender. 3/31/19 

The Better ’Ole. 3/19 

T'he Little Intruder. 4/7/19 

The Scar . 4/14/19 

T’he Quickening Flame. 4/21/19 

'Three Green Eyes. 4/2S/19 

Ginger ...*.. . 5/5/19 

The Social Pirate. 5/12/19 

T’he Unwritten Code. 5/19/19 

The Amateur Widow. 5/26/19 

Phil-for-Short . 6/2/19 

Through the Toils . 6/9/19 

The Devil’s Trail. 6/16/19 

Love and the Woman. 6/23/19 

Home Wanted . 6/30/19 

The American Way. 7/7/19 

Dust of Desire . 7/14/19 

Bringing Up Betty . 7/21/19 

Broadway Saint . 7/28/19 

Coax Me . 8/4/19 

The Praise Agent . 8/11/19 

'Che Girl Alaska. 8/18/19 

The Battler . 8/31/19 

Where Bonds Are Loosed. 8/19 

Zion Films—State Rights 
Broken Barriers (Khavah). 5/19 


























































































































































































































































































Stars and Their Productions 


Jack Abbe 

Mystic Face 
Claire Adams 
Key to Power 
Kathryn Adams 
Little Brother of the Rich 
Whom the Gods Destroy 
May Allison 
Her Inspiration 
Almost Married 
Island of Intrigue 
Testing of Mildred Yane 
In for Thirty Days 
Uplifter 

Return of Mary 
Peggy Does Her Dardest 
Castles in the Air 
Claire Anderson 
Crown Jewels 
Mask of Riches 
Grey Parasol 
G. A. Anderson 

Red Blood and Yellow 
Edwin Arden 
Ruling Passions 
Julia Arthur 
Cavell Case 
Arthur Ashley 
American Way 
Praise Agent 
King Baggot 

Man Who Stayed at Home 
Leah Baird 
The Volcano 
Window Opposite 
As a Man Thinks 
Echo of Youth 
Theda Bara 
Siren’s Song 
When a Woman Sins 
When Men Desire 
Woman There Was 
The Light 
Salome 

Chester Barnett 

Woman 

Bessie Barriscale 
Heart of Rachael 
Two-Gun Betty 
White Lie 
Trick of Fate 
Woman Michael Married 
Tangled Threads 
Joselyn’s Wife 
Hearts Asleep 
All of a Sudden Norma 
Her Purchase Price 
Ethel Barrymore 
The Divorcee 
Test of Honor 
Jack Barrymore 

Here Comes the Bride 
Francis X. Bushman-Beverly 
Bayne 

Daring Hearts 
Poor Rich Man 
, God’s Outlaw 
Bichard Barthelmess 
Broken Blossoms 
Cora Beach 

What Becomes of the Chil¬ 
dren 

George Beban 
Hearts of Men 
Belle Bennett 

Mayor of Filbert 
Reckoning Day 
The Atom 
Enid Bennett 
Stepping Out 
Fuss and Feathers 
Happy Though Married 
Haunted Bedroom 
Law of Men 
When Do We Eat 
Partners Three 
Virtuous Thief 
Lotiis Bennison 
High Pockets 
Oh Johnny 
Speedy Meade 
Road Called Straight 
Sandy Burke oftheU-Bar-U 
Faire Binney 
Woman 

Open Your Eyes 
Carlyle Blackwell 
3 Green Eyes 
Hit or Miss 
Courage for Two 
Love in a Hurry 
Road to France 
By Hook or Crook 


Margaret Blache 

Place in the Sun 
Betty Blythe 
Green God 
Mary Boland 
Prodigal Wife 
Woman’s Experience 
John Bowers 
The Sea Waif 
Bothwell Browne 

Yankee Doodle in Berlin 
Alice Brady 
His Bridal Night 
World to Live In 
Red Head 

In the Hollow of Her Hand 
Indestructible Wife 
Her Great Chance 
Better Half 
Marie, Ltd. 

Sylvia Breamer 
House Divided 
Common Cause 
Gladys Brockwell 
Divorce Trap 
Forbidden Room 
Strange Woman 
Call of the Soul 
Knltur 

Pitfalls of a Big City 
The Sneak 

Broken Commandments 
Chasing Rainbows 
Fritzl Brunette 
City of Purple Dreams 
Woman Under Cover 
Velvet Hand 
Sealed Envelope 
Woman Thou Gavest Me 
Beware of Strangers 
Who Shall Take My Life 
Billie Burke 

Good Gracious Annabelle 
Make Believe Wife 
Misleading Widow 
David Butler 

Greatest Thing in Life 
Catherine Calvert 

Career of Katherine Bush 
Fires of Faith 
Marriage for Convenience 
Marriage 
Out of the Night 
June Caprice 
The Love Cheat 
Oh Boy 
Harry Carey 

Riders of Vengeance 
Bare Fists 
Ace of the Saddle 
Outcasts of Poker Flat 
Fight for Love 
Roped 

Three Mounted Men 
Enrico Caruso 

Splendid Romance 
My Cousin 
Francis Carpenter 
Fan Fan 
Anna Case 

Hidden Truth 
Dolores Casinelli 
Soul Adrift 
Unknown Love 
Lafayette We Come 
Ellen Cassidy 

Other Man’s Wife 
Irene Castle 
Firing Line 
Barbara Castleton 
Just Sylvia 
What Love Forgives 
Lina Cavalieri 
Rose of Granada 
Woman of Impulse 
Two Brides 
Edward Cecil 
After the War 
Helene Chadwick 
Caleb Piper’s Girl 
Go Get ’Em Garriety 
Solitary Sin 
Charlie Chaplin 
Sunnyside 
Shoulder Arms 
Margnerite Clark 
Girls 

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch 

Let’s Elope 

Come Out of the Kitchen 
Three Men and a Girl 
Out of a Clear Sky 
Littre Miss Hoover 


Ethel Clayton 

■ Women’s Weapons 
Maggie Pepper 
Woman Next Door 
Girl Who Came Back 
Soul Without Windows 
Men, Women and Money 
Pettigrew’s Girl 
Sporting Chance 
Mystery Girl 
Arthur Cleave 
Better ’Ole 
Katlilen Clifford 
Law That Divides 
Angel Child 
Ruth Clifford 
Cabaret Girl 
Lure of Luxury 
Game’s Up, The 
Lew Cody 

Don’t Change Your Hus¬ 
band 

Betty Compson 
Miracle Man 
Devil’s Trail 
Border Raiders 
Miriam Cooper 
Evangeline 
Jack Conway 
Royal Democrat 
Virginia Lee Corbin 
Fan Fan 
Edward Coxen 
Mother I Need You 
Donald Crisp 
Broken Blossoms 
Irving Cummings 
The Scar 
Grace Cunard 
After the War 
Chas. Dalton 

Eternal Magdalene 
Emmett Dalton 
Beyond the Law 
Dorothy Dalton 
Vive La France 
Hard Boiled 
Home Breaker 
Lady of Red Butte 
Other Men’s Wives 
Extravagance 
Quicksand 
Hazel Daly 
Little Rowdy 
Wild Goose Chase 
Viola Dana 
Satan Junior 
Parisian Tigress 
Some Bride 
Jeanne of the Gutter 
The Microbe 
Gold Cure 
False Evidence. 

Grace Darmond 

What Every Woman Wants 
Marion Davies 

Belle of New York 
Burden of Proof 
Getting Mary Married 
Dark Star 
Grace Davidson 
Suspicion 
Marjorie Daw 
Sunset Princess 
Edith Day 

Romance in the Air 
Priscilla Dean 
Exquisite Thief 
Wicked Darling 
Pretty Smooth 
Kiss or Kill 
Silk-Lined Burglar 
She Hired a Husband 
Wildcat of Paris 
Loys Del Kay 
Sin of the World 
Yvonne Delva 
Thirteenth Chair 
Ruby de Remer 
Fires of Faith 
Dust of Desire 
Safe for Democracy 
William Desmond 
The Pretender 
Sage Brush Hamlet 
Prodigal Liar 

Life’s a Funny Proposition 
Deuce Duncan 
Bare-Fisted Gallagher 
White-Washed Walls 
Mints of Hell 
Gaby Deslys t 

Infatuation 


Harry Devereaux 
Successful Failure 
Elliott Dexter 

Squaw Man 

For Better, For Worse 
Don’t Change Your Husband 
Eve Dorrlngton 

Your Wife and Mine 
Phillip Yale Drew 
Root of Evil 
Joseph Drumler 
Love Net 
Helen Eddy 
Turn in the Road 
Maxine Elliott 

Eternal Magdalene 
June Elvidge 
The Bluffer 
Moral Deadline 
Zero Hour 
Social Pirate 
Coax Me 
Love Defender 
Love and the Woman 
Appearance of Evil 
Power and the Glory 
3 Green Eyes 
Madge Evans 
Home Wanted 
Love Net 
Love Defender 
Bessie Eyton 

City of Purple Dreams 
Beware of Strangers 
Who Shall Take My Life 
Elinor Fair 

Words and Music 
Be a Little Sport 
Married in Haste 
Love is Love 
Douglas Fairbanks 
Knickerbocker Buckaroo 
Arizona 

He Comes Up Smiling 
Dustin Farnum 
Light of Western Stars 
Man’s Fight 
Man in the Open 
William Farnum 
Wolves of the Night 
Lone Star Ranger 
Jungle Trail 

Riders of the Purple Sage 
Rainbow Trail 
For Freedom 
Man Hunter 
Geraldine Farrar 
Stronger Vow 
Turn of the Wheel 
Shadows 
Hell Cat 
George Fawcett 
Romance of Happy Valley 
The Railroaders 
Girl Who Stayed at Home 
Hun Within 
William Faversham 
Silver King 
Elsie Ferguson 
Marriage Price 
Eyes of the Soul 
Avalanche 

LTnder the Greenwood Tree 
Heart of the Wilds 
Society Exile 
David G. Fischer 
Law of Nature 
Where Bonds Are Loosed 
Margarita Fisher 
Tiger Lily 
Charge It to Me 
Trixie from Broadway 
Mantle of Charity 
Molly of the Follies 
Money Isn’t Everything 
Put Up Your Hands 
Francis Ford 
Silent Mystery 
The Craving 
Tom Forman 
For Better, For Worse 
Lucy Fox 

Why I Would Not Marry 
Pauline Frederick 
Woman on the Index 
One Week of Life 
Daughter of the Old South 
Out of the Shadow 
Paid in Full 
Fear Woman 
Peace of Roaring River 
Mae Gaston 
Silent Mystery 



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Dorothy Gish 

Nugget Nell 
Hun Within 
Battling Jane 
Boots 

I’ll Get Him Tet 
Hope Chest 
Peppy Polly 
Out of Luck 

Lillian Gish 

Romance of Happy Valley 
Greatest Thing in Life 
Broken Blossoms 
True Heart Susie 

Gaston Glass 
Open Your Eyes 

Lonlse Glaum 

Goddess of Lost Lake 
Sahara 

J. Frank Glendon 

By the World Forgot 
Edna Goodrich 
Treason 

Gloria Goodwin 
Woman 
Kitty Gordon 

Adclo 

Playthings of Passion 
Unveiling Hand 
The Scar 
Mandarin’s Gold 
Balph Graves 
Sporting Life 
Evelyn Greeley 
Phil-for-Short 
Bringing Up Betty 
By Hook or Crook 
Road to France 
Love in a Hurry 
Courage for Two 
Hit or Miss 
3 Green Eyes 
Dorothy Green 
Praise Agent 
American Way 
Jane Grey 

When My Ship Comes In 
Corinne Griffith 
Girl of Today 
Miss Ambition 
Bramble Bush 
Girl Problem 
Adventure Shop 
Girl at Bay 
Unknown Quantity 
Thin Ice 

James K. Hackett 
Ashes of Love 
Creighton Hale 
Oh Boy 

Why Germany Must Pay 
The Love Cheat 
Cavell Case 
The Thirteenth Chair 
Lt. Bert Hall 

Romance in the Air 
Thurston Hall 
Midnight Patrol 
Ethel Hallor 
Woman 

Hale Hamilton 

Four Flusher 
Johnny on the Spot 
Five Thousand an Hour 
That’s Good 
Full of Pep 
After His Own Heart 
His Brother’s Place 
Shorty Hamilton 
When Arizona Won 
Pen Vullture 
The Ranger 
The Snail 

Denny from Ireland 
Elaine Hammersteln 
Country Cousin 
Love or Fame 
Wanted for Murder 
Virginia Hammond 
The Battler 
Alma Hanlon 

Sins of the Children 
Jnanita Hansen 
Sea Flower 
Mildred Harris 
Home 

Borrowed Clothes 
When a Girl Loves 
Robert Harron 

Girl Who Stayed at Home 
True Heart Susie 
Greatest Thing in Life 
Romance of Happy Valley 
Mother and the Law 
Neal Hart 

When the Desert Smiled 


William S. Hart 

Wagon Tracks 
Square Deal Sanderson 
Poppy Girl’s Husband 
Money Corral 
Branding Broadway 
Breed of Men 
Border Wireless 
Alice Hastings 
Broken Barriers (Ehavah) 
Wanda Hawley 
Virtuous Sinners 
Sessue Hayakawa 
His Debt 
His Birthright 
Heart in Pawn 
Gray Horizon 
Temple of Dusk 
Courageous Coward 
Bonds of Honor 
Man Beneath 
Johnny Hines 
Just Sylvia 
Little Intruder 
3 Green Eyes 
Stuart Holmes 
Sins of the Children 
Treason 

Other Man’s Wife 
Taylor Holmes 

Black Eyes 
Regular Fellow 
It’s a Bear 
Upside Down 
Taxi 

Jack Holt 

Woman Thou Gavest Me 
Houdlni 

Grim Game 
Louise Huff 
Sea Waif 
Oh You Women 
Little Intruder 
Crook of Dreams 
Heart of Gold 
’Tother Dear Charmer 
Gareth Hughes 
Red Viper 

And the Children Pay 
Ginger 

Peggy Hyland 
Cowardice Court 
Rebellious Bride 
Marriages Are Made 
Miss Adventure 
Bonnie Annie Laurie 
Girl With No Regrets 
Caught in the Act 
Cheating Herself 
Henry B. Irving 
Lyon’s Mail 
Elsie Janis 

A Regular Girl 
A1 Jennings 

Lady of the Dugout 
Alice Joyce 

Captain’s Captain 
Cambric Mask 
Everybody’s Girl 
Lion and the Mouse 
Spark Divine 
Third Degree 
Rupert Julian 
Fire Flingers 
Gail Kane 
Love’s Law 
Zeena Keefe 

Challenge Accepted 
Amateur Widow 
Frank Keenan 
Gates of Brass 
World Aflame 
Silver Girl 
The Bells 
Master Man 
Todd of the Times 
Midnight Stage 
Helen Keller 
Deliverance 
Madge Kennedy 

Through the Wrong Door 
Kingdom of Youth 
Leave It to Susan 
Day Dreams 
Daughter of Mine 
Perfect Lady 
Doris Kenyon 
Wild Honey 
Twilight 

J. Warren Kerrigan 

Prisoners of the Pines 
End of the Game 
Three X Gordon 
The Drifters 
Come Again Smith 
Best Man 

A White Man’s Chance 


Norman Kerry 

Virtuous Sinners 
Willette Kershaw 
Sporting Life 
Anita King 

Whatever the Cost 
Mistaken Identity 
One Against Many 
Molly King 
Human Clay 
Suspense 
James Knight 
Romany Lass 
Henry Krauss 
Vagabond of France 
Lottie Kruse 
Girl Alaska 
George Larkin 
Border Raiders 
Devil’s Trail 
Kay Laurel 
The Brand 
Gretchen Lederer 
Wife or Country 
Dixie Lee 

Where Bonds Are Loosed 
Jane and Katherine Lee 
Smiles 

Swat the Spy 

Tell It to the Marines 

Lila Lee 

Cock o’ the Walk 
Rustling a Bride 
Secret Garden 
Such a Little Pirate 
Rose of the River 
Daughter of the Wolf 
Cruise of the Make Believe 
Puppy Love 
Heart of Youth 
Anna Lehr 

Thunderbolts of Fate 
Gladys Leslie 
Stitch in Time 
Too Many Crooks 
Miss Dulcie from Dixie 
Fortune’s Child 
Beloved Imposter 
Nymph of the Woods 
The Mating * 

Girl Woman 
Mitchell Lewis 

Jacques of the Silver North 
Children of Banishment 
Fool’s Gold 
Code of the Yukon 
Life’s Greatest Problem 
Safe for Democracy 
E. K. Lincoln 

Fighting Through 
Desert Gold 
Virtuous Men 
Romance of Tarzan 
Unknown Love 
Lafayette We Come 
Anna Little 
Squaw Man 
Harold Lockwood 
Pals First 

Shadows of Suspicion 
Great Romance 
Man of Honor 
Bessie Love 

Dawn of Understanding 
Carolyn of the Corners 
Cupid Forecloses 
Little Boss 
Yankee Princess 
Over the Garden Wall 
Wishing Ring Man 
Enchanted Barn 
Montagu Love 
3 Green Eyes 
Hand Invisible 
Through the Toils 
To Him That Hath 
Rough Neck 
The Grouch 
Broadway Saint 
Quickening Flame 
John Lowell 
The Clouded Name 
Wilfred Lucas 

Girl from Nowhere 
The Westerners 
Bert Lytell 
Unexpected Places 
Lion’s Den 
Easy to Make Money 
Hitting the High Spots 
The Spender 
Faith 

Blackie’s Redemption 
Blind Man’s Eyes 
One-Thing-at-a-Time O’Day 
Marc MacDermott 
Girl of Today 


Francis MacDonald 

Tony America 
Katherine MacDonald 
Woman Thou Gavest Me 
Maciste 

The Liberator 
Mary MacLaren 
Secret Marriage 
A Petal on the Current 
Creaking Stairs 
Weaker Vessel 
Vanity Pool 
Amazing Wife 
Unp&inted Woman 
Douglas MacLean 
Hun Within 
Cleo Madison 

Girl from Nowhere 
Alice Mann 

Fruits of Passion 
Water Lily 
Frances Mann 
Root of Evil 
Emilie Marceau 
Open Your Eyes 
Aurora Mardijanian 
Auction of Souls 
Enid Markey 

Romance of Tarzan 
Mother I Need You 
Mae Marsh 

Spotlight Sadie 
Bondage of Barbara 
Racing Strain 
Hidden Fires 
Mother and the Law 
Marguerite Marsh 
Royal Democrat 
Eternal Magdalene 
Fair Enough 
Conquered Hearts 
Tully Marshall 

Girl Who Stayed at Home 
Crimson Gardenia 
Vivian Martin 
Home Town Girl 
Louisiana 
Little Comrade 
Her Country First 
You Never Saw Such a Girl 
An Innocent Adventuress 
Jane Goes A-Wooing 
Mirandy Smiles 
The Third Kiss 
Shirley Mason 
Winning Girl 
Unwritten Code 
Come On In 
Good Bye Bill 
Rescuing Angel 
Final Close-Up 
Frank Mayo 
Zero Hour 
Moral Deadline 
Pow’er and the Glory 
Appearance of Evil 
Little Brother of the Rich 
Gertrude McCoy 

His Daughter Pays 
Frank McIntyre 
Too Fat to Fight 
Thos. Meighan 
Miracle Man 
Violet Mersereau 
Nature Girl 
Together 

Gertrude Messinger 
Ali Baba and Forty Thieves 
Harry Mestayer 
Wife or Country 
The Atom 
Earle Metcalfe 
The Battler 
Beatriz Michelena 
Bead Line 
Just Squaw 
Bliss Milford 

And the Children Pay 
Jane Miller 
Forfeit 

Unbroken Promise 
Mary Miles Minter 

Rosemary Climbs Heights 
Wives and Other Wives 
Intrusion of Isabel 
Eyes of Julia Deep 
Amazing Imposter 
Mary O’Rourke 
Homespun 
Yvonne from Paris 
Bachelor’s Wife 
Tom Mix! 

Fame and Fortune 
Wilderness Trail 
Hell Roarin’ Reform 
Fighting for Gold 
Coming of the Law 



WILLIAM P. S. 
EAFLLE 

Director of Successes: 

WITHIN THE LAW 
MARY JANE’S PA 
THE LAW DECIDES 
HIS OWN PEOPLE 
WOMANHOOD 

THE COURAGE OF SILENCE 
WHOM THE GODS DESTROY 
I WILL REPAY 

THE WOOING OF PRINCESS PAT 
FOR THE HONOR OF THE CREW 
LITTLE MISS NO ACCOUNT 
WHO GOES THERE! 

THE LITTLE RUNAWAY 
T’OTHER DEAR CHARMER 
THE BETTER WIFE 
THE LONE WOLF’S DAUGHTER 
ETC., ETC. 

Address: 

1825 Cahuenga Avenue 

Hollywood, Cal. 



; _ ; 





SIDNEY A. 
FRANKLIN 


Directing 

MARY 

PICKFORD 

















Mr. Logan, U. S. A. 

Treat ’Em Rough 
Roughriding Romance 

Coleen Moore 

Little Orphant Annie 

Owen Moore 

Crimson Gardenia 
Tom Moore 
Just for Tonight 
Thirty a Week 
Man and His Money 
Go West Young Man 
One of the Finest 
City of Comrades 
Heartsease 

Lord and Lady Algy 
Harry Morey 
Silent Strength 
King of Diamonds 
Hoarded Assets 
The Gamblers 
Man Who Won 
Green God 
Fighting Destiny 
Beauty Proof 
Beating the Odds 
.lack Mulhall 
Solitary Sin 

Whom the Gods Destroy 
Mae Murray 

What Am I Bid 
Scarlet Shadow 
Modern Love 
Delicious Little Devil 
Big Little Person 
Danger—Go Slow 
Carmel Myers 
Who Will Marry Me 
Society of Sensation 
Little White Savage 
All Night 
Nazimova 

Out of the Fog 
Red Lantern 
Eye for Eye 
The Brat 
Anna Q. Nilsson 
Way of the Strong 
Over There 
Evelyn Nesbit 
I Want to Forget 
Her Mistake 
Fallen Idol 
My Little Sister 
Woman W T ho Gave 
Woman, Woman 
Thou Shalt Not 
Mabel Normand 
Sis Hopkins 
The Pest 

When Doctors Disagree 
Perfect 36 
Peck’s Bad Girl 
Upstairs 
Hedda Nova 

Crimson Gardenia 
Spitfire of Seville 
By the World Forgot 
Eugene O'Brien 
Perfect Lover 
Sealed Heart 
Fires of Faith 
Baby Marie Osborne 

Milady O’The Beanstalk 
Old Maid’s Baby 
Sawdust Doll 
Dolly’s Vacation 
Little Diplomat 
Child of M’sieu 
Muriel Ostriche 
Hand Invisible 
Violet Palmer 
Ginger 

Virginia Pearson 
Buchanan’s Wife 
Queen of Hearts 
Love Auction 
Bishop’s Emeralds 
Private Harold Peat 
Private Peat 
House Peters 

You Never Know Your Luck 
Forfeit 

Thunderbolts of Fate 

Olga Petrova 
Panther Woman 
Dorothy Phillips 
Paid in Advance 
Destiny 

Heart of Humanity 
Talk of the Town 
Right to Happiness 


Jack Plckford 

Bill Apperson’s Boy 
Burglar by Proxy 
Mary Pickford 

Daddy Long Legs 
Johanna Enlists 
Captain Kidd, Jr. 

Zasu Pitts 
Better Times 
Other Half 
Arline Pretty 
Challenge of Chance 
Herbert Rawlinson 
Kiss or Kill 
Common Cause 
Albert Ray 
Love is Love 
Be a Little Sport 
Words and Music 
Married in Haste 
Charles Ray 
String Beans 
Hay Foot, Straw Foot 
Greased Lightning 
Girl Dodger 
The Busher 
Sheriff’s Son 
Law of the North 
Bill Henry 
Florence Reed 

Woman Under Oath 
Her Code of Honor 
Wallace Reid 
Love Burglar 
Too Many Millions 
You’re Fired 

Man from Funeral Range 
Alias Mike Moran 
The Dub 
Roaring Road 
Valley of the Giants 
Billie Rhodes 

Lamb and the Lion 
In Search of Arcady 
Blue Bonnet 
Hoop-La 

Girl of My Dreams 
Love Call 
Jack Richardson 
Desert Law 
Mayor of Filbert 
Wife or Country 
Charles Richman 
Over There 
Echo of Youth 
Everybody’s Business 
Warner Richmond 
Sporting Life 
Edith Roberts 
Brazen Beauty 
Set Free 
Sue of the South 
Taste of Life 
Beans 

Theodore Roberts 
Don’t Change Your Husband 
Charles Rock 
The Better ’Ole 
Will Rogers 

Laughing Bill Hyde 
Alma Rubens 
Man’s Country 
Restless Souls 
Diana of the Green Van 
William Russell 
Sporting Chance 
This Hero Stuff 
Signet of Sheba 
Six Feet Four 
All the World for Nothing 
Brass Buttons 
Hobbs in a Hurry 
Some Liar 

When a Man Rides Alone 
Where the West Begins 
Monroe Salisbury 
Man in the Moonlight 
Blinding Trail 
Sleeping Lion 
Millionaire Pirate 
Light of Victory 
Hugon the Mighty 
Sundown Trail 
Tom Santschi 

Little Orphant Annie 
Who Shall Take My Life 
Beware of Strangers 
City of Purple Dreams 
Earl Schenck 

Ruling Passions 
The Kaiser’s Finish 
Mabel Scott 
Ashes of Love 


Effie Shannon 
Ashes of Love 
Jackie Saunders 
Muggsy 
Pearl Shepard 

Break the News to Mother 
Echo of Youth 
Jack Sherrill 

Once to Every Man 
J. Barney Sherry 
The Secret Code 
Reckoning Day 
Mayor of Filbert 

Nell Shipman. 

Tiger of the Sea 
Walter Shumway 
What Becomes of the Chil¬ 
dren 

Milton Sills 

Woman Thou Gavest Me 
Russell Simpson 
The Brand 
Pauline Starke 
Irish Eyes 
The Atom 

Whom the Gods Destroy 
Myrtle Sterling 

Sage-Brush League 
Emily Stevens 

Kildare of the Storm 
Anita Stewart 
Painted World 
From Headquarters 
Shadows of the Past 
Two Women 
Midnight Romance 
Mary Regan 
Virtuous Men 
Roy Stewart 
Untamed 
Silent Rider 
The Westerners 
Lewis S. Stone 
Man’s Desire 
Johnny Get Your Gun 
Man of Bronz 
Fred Stone 
Under the Top 
The Goat 
George Stone 
Ali Baba and the Forty 
Thieves 
Edith Story 

As the Sun Went Down 
Silent Woman 
Gloria Swanson 
Wife or Country 
Secret Code 
For Better, for Worse 
Don’t Change Your Hus¬ 
band 

Blanche Sweet 
Unpardonable Sin 
Stella Talbot 

Price of Innocence 
Constance Talmadge 
Experimental Marriage 
Romance and Arabella 
Mrs. Leffingwell’s Boots 
Happiness a la Mode 
Veiled Adventure 
Lady’s Name 
Who Cares 
Norma Talmadge 
Forbidden City 
Heart of Wetona 
Probation Wife 
Way of a Woman 
New Moon 
Olive Tell 
The Trap 
Secret Strings 
Ellen Terry 

Her Greatest Performance 
Rosemary Theby 
Love’s Pay Day 
Are You Legally Married 
Silent Mystery 
When A Woman Strikes 
Olive Thomas 
Follies Girl 
Love’s Prisoner 
Up Stairs and Down 
Prudence of Broadway 
Toton 

Spite Bride 
Hugh Thompson 
Key to Power 
Lottie Tilford 
Human Passions 
Madlaine Traverse 
Danger Zone 
Caillaux Case 


Rose of the West 
When Fate Decides 
Love That Dares 
Gambling In Souls 
Splendid Sin 
Ernest Truax 
Come On In 
Good Bye Bill 
Oh You Women 
Florence Turner 
Fool’s Gold 
Mile. Valkyrlen 

Commercial Pirates 
Bolshevism on Trial 
Marie Walcamp 
Togues of Flame 
Lillian Walker 
Embarrassment of Riches 
Love Hunger 
Charlotte Walker 
Every Mother’s Son 
George Walsh 
Winning Stroke 
Luck and Pluck 
Seventh Person 
I”ll Say So 
Help, Help Police 
Never Say Quit 
Putting One Over 
On the Jump 
Henry B. Walthall 
Boomerang 

And a Stilll Small Voice 
Long Arm of Mannister 
Long Lane’s Turning 
False Faces 
Modern Husbands 
Fannie Ward 
Profiteers 
Cry of the Weak 
Our Better Selves 
Narrow Path 
Japanese Nightingale 
Common Clay 
H. B. Warner 
Pagan God 

Man Who Turned White 
Robert Warwick 
Secret Service 
Told in the Hills 
Bryant Washburn 
Putting It Over 
Gypsey Trail 
Venus in the East 
Way of a Man With a Maid 
Poor Boob 

Very Good Young Man 
Something to Do 
All Wrong 
Love Insurance 
Claire Whitney 
Kaiser’s Finish 
Ruling Passions 
Better ’Ole 

Man Who Stayed at Home 
Emmy Wehlen 
His Bonded Wife 
Sylvia on a Spree 
Favor to a Friend 
Family Tree 
Belle of the Season 
Fools and Their Money 
Amateur Adventuress 
Crane Wilbur 
Devil M’Care 
Breezy Jim 
Into the End 
Finger of Justice 
Stripped for a Million 
Jess Willard 

Challenge Accepted 
Clara Williams 
The One Woman 
Earle Williams 
Man Who Wouldn’t Tell 
Rogue’s Romance 
Highest Trump 
The Wolf 
The Usurper 
Hornet’s Nest 
Gentlemen of Quality 
Diplomatic Mission 
Ben Wilson 

When A Woman Strikes 
Mabel Withee 

Once to Every Man 

Hugh E. AVright 

Better ’Ole 
Clara Kimball Young 

Road Through the Dark 
Better Wife 
Cheating Cheaters 




Edmund Goulding 

ADDRESS: 

1 West 67th Street 
New York City 

Telephone, Columbus 4204 


LONDON ADDRESS: 

166 Shattsbury Avenue 
London, England 

Telephone, Gerard 4070 




MARGARITA FISHER 


oAMERICAN 
FILM COMPANY 





















































David Abel 

Maggie Pepper 
Lady of the Dugout 
New Moon 
Probation Wife 
Heart of Wetona 
Hun Within 
Way of a Woman 
William S. Adams 
Two Women 
From Headquarters 
Painted World 
Lucien Andriot 
Oh Boy 
John Arnold 
False Evidence 
Gold Cure 
The Microbe 
Some Bride 
Parisian Tigress 
Satan Junior 
Joe August 

Border Wireless 
Breed of Men 
Branding Broadway 
Money Corral 
Poppy Girl’s Husband 
Square Deal Sanderson 
He Comes Up Smiling 
Wagon Tracks 
Jacob A. Badaracco 
Love’s Law 
Coax Me 
Friend Baker 
Strange Woman 
Call of the Soul 
Kultur 
The Sneak 
Rebellious Bride 
Fighting for Gold 
Hell Roarin’ Reform 
Wilderness Trail 
Broken Commandments 
Chasing Rainbows 
Andre Barlatier 
Belle of New York 
Burden of Proof 
Break the News to Mother 
George Barnes 
Haunted Bedroom 
Law of Men 
Partners Three 
William J. Beckway 
Man’s Desire 
Rudolph Bergquist 
Way of the Strong 
Shadows of Suspicion 
After His Own Heart 
Full of Pep 
His Brother’s Place 
Great Romance 
His Bonded Wife 
Four Flusher 
C. F. Bltzer 
Suspense 
George W. Bltzer 
Romance of Happy Valley 
Greatest Thing in Life 
True Heart Susie 
Girl Who Stayed At Home 
Broken Blossoms 
Fall of Babylon 
Mother and the Law 
Jacques Bizeul 
Paid in Full 
Out of the Shadow 
Daughter of the Old South 
Under the Greenwood Tree 
Eyes of the Soul 
Marriage Price 
William Black 
Five Thousand An Hour 
Virtuous Men 
Arthur Boeger 

Unbroken Promise 
The Forfeit 
John Boyle 

When My Ship Comes In 
Lone Star Ranger 
Salome 

Woman There Was 
When Men Desire 
When a Woman Sins 
Siren’s Song 
Wolves of the Night 
She Devil 
Frederick S. Brace 
Ginger 

Joseph Brotherton 
Boomerang 
Code of the Yukon 
Angel Child 
Long Lane’s Turning 
Law That Divides 
George Brantlgan 
Common Cause 


Work of Cameramen 


H. L. Broening 

Better Half 
Getting Mary Married 
Dark Star 
John W. Brown 
Bare Fists 
Riders of Vengeance 
Outcasts or Poker Flat 
Roped 

Virtuous Wives 
Wilfred Buckland 
Such a Little Pirate 
A. A. Cadwell 
As A Man Thinks 
Too Fat to Fight 
Laughing Bill Hyde 
Black Eyes 
David Calcagni 
High Pockets 
Oh Johnny 
Speedy Meade 
Road Called Straight 
Sandy Burke of the U-Bar-U 
For the Freedom of the East 
Hugh Carlyle 
Arizona 
Robert Carson 

Children of Banishment 
Jacoues of the Silver North 
Dal Clawson 

Courageous Coward 
Temple of Dusk 
Heart in Pawn 
Midnight Romance 
Mary Regan 
Clyde R. Cook 
All Wrong 
Mystic Face 
Wife or Country 
Love’s Pay Day 
H. Cronjager 

Three Men and a Girl 
Caillaux Case 
Land of The Free 
Why America Will Win 
Jules Cronjager 
Stitch in Time 
Too Many Crooks 
Miss Dulcie from Dixie 
Fortunes Child 
Beloved Imposter 
Nymph of the Woods 
The Mating 
Girl Woman 
Wm. Crowley 

Other Man’s Wife 
Hidden Truth 
Allan Davey 
Weaker Vessel 
Blue Bonnet 
Charles Davis 
Our Teddy 
Girl of Today 
Clyde de Vinna 
White Lie 
Heart of Rachael 
Adele 

Playthings of Passion 
Little Boss 
Yankee Princess 
All Wrong 
One Woman 
Max Dupont 
The Wolf 

Dawn of Understanding 
Rogue’s Romance 
Gentleman of Quality 
Norman Dwan 

Right to Happiness 
Destiny 

Edward C. Earle 
. .Woman’s Experience 
Thunder Bolts of Fate 
Rothapfel’s First Unit 
Programme 
Arthur Edeson 
Cheating Cheaters 
Road Through the Dark 
Better Wife 
Wm. Edmonds 
Desert Law 
William Fildew 
God’s Outlaw 
Her Inspiration 
In For Thirty Days 
Testing of Mildred Vane 
Island of Intrigue 
Almost Married 
Castles in the Air 
Peggy Does Her Darndest 
Return of Mary 
Petal on the Current 
Harry Flschbeck 
Hed Code of Honor 
Ross Fisher 

Lamb and the Lion 
Love Call 


George Folsey 
His Bridal Night 
Harry Forbes 
Souls Adrift 
William Foster 

Riders of the Purple Sage 
The Man Hunter 
Rainbow Trail 
For Freedom 
Harry Forbes 
Souls Adrift 
Together 

Sins of the Children 
Harry Fowler 

Lamb and the Lion 
Lawrence Fowler 
Deliverance 
Frank E. Garbutt 
Home Town Girl 
An Innocent Adventuress 
You Never Saw Such a Girl 
Her Country First 
Mirandy Smiles 
Experimental Marriage 
Gypsey Trail 
Poor Boob 
Louisiana 
The Third Kiss 
Antonio Gaudio 
Unpardonable Sin 
Pals First 
Man of Honor 
Eugene Gaudio 
Eye for Eye 
Red Lantern 
Out of the Fog 
Man Who Stayed at Home 
The Uplifters 
The Brat 
Harry Gersted 
Salome 

Girl with No Regrets 
Danger Zone 
Gambling In Souls 
Edward Gheller 
The Craving 
One Week of Life 
Fear Woman 
Women on the Index 
Peace of Roaring River 
Alfred Gondolfl 
Crook of Dreams 
Little Intruder 
The Grouch 
The Rough Neck 
Bringing Up Betty 
Frank B. Good 
Fan Fan 
Smiles 

Rose of the West 
When Fate Decides 
Love That Dares 
Alfred Gosden 
Pretty Smooth 
Wicked Darling 
Exquisite Thief 
Games Up, The 
Spitfire of Seville 
Brazen Beauty 
Set Free 

Fred Le Roy Granville 

Divorce Trap 
Coming of the Law 
Heart of Humanity 
Talk of the Town 
Rough Riding Romance 
King Gray 
Cowardice Court 
Amazing Wife 
Vanity Pool 
Solitary Sin 
Heart of Humanity 
Cheating Herself 
Walter Griffin 

Long Lane's Turning 
Modern Husbands 
Boomerang 
Rene Guissart 
White Heather 
Little Women 
Harry Harde 
Caleb Piper’s Girl 
Harry V. Harris 

White-Washed Walls 
Mint of Hell 
Destiny 

Light of Victory 
Hugon the Mighty 
Right to Happiness 
Fred Hartman 
Silent Mystery 
Philip Hatkin 
Heart of Gold 
Zero Hour 
Moral Deadline 
Social Pirate 


Just Sylvia 
The Bluffer 
Love and the Woman 
Home Wanted 
Frank Heats 
Girl Woman 
Fred Held 

Key to Power 
Percy Higglnson 
Unbroken Promise 
Forfeit 

Percy Hilburn 
Stronger Vow 
The Pest 
Sis Hopkins 
Hell Cat 
Shadows 

Turn of the Wheel 
The Girl from Outside 
Chas. W. Hoffman 
Challenge Accepted 
John Holbrook 

Romance in the Air 
Woman Under Oath 
Commercial Pirates 
George K. Hollister 
Silent Woman 
Why Germany Must Pay 
The Divorcee 
Edward Horn 
Dust of Desire 
Through the Toils 
H. A. Horn 
Fools’ Gold 
Pliny Horne 
Secret Code 
Prudence of Broadway 
Joseph R. Howard 
Whatever the Cost 
James Hutchinson 
Made in America 
J. D. Jennings 
Evangeline 
Forbidden Room 
Cowardice Court 
Treat ’Em Rough 
Mr. Logan, U. S. A. 

Fame and Fortune 
Miss Adventure 
Harold Jones 
Heart of Humanity 
Frank Kirby 
Some Wild Oats 
Chas. Kaufman 
Midnight Stage 
Todd of the Times 
Master Man 
Silver Girl 
Gates of Brass 
The Bells 
World Aflame 
A White Man’s Chance 
Roy Klaffkl 
Words and Music 
Married in Haste 
Borrowed Clothes 
Home 

Henry Kotanl 

Puppy Love 
Secret Garden 
Rustling a Bride 
Johnny Get Your Gun 
Under the Top 
The Goat 
Told in the Hills 
Ed. Kull 

Millionaire Pirate 
Sleeping Lion 
Lure of Luxury 
Fire Flingers 
Creaking Stairs 
Robert R. Kurrle 
Unexpected Places’ 

One Thing at a Time O’ Day 
Blind Man’s Eyes 
Blackie Redemption 
Faith 

The Spender 
Hitting the High Spots 
Easy to Make Money 
Lion’s Den 
Sam Landers 
Regular Fellow 
It’s a Bear 
Fighting Through 
Mayor of Filbert 
Heartsease 
George Lane 
Thou Shalt Not 
Buchanan’s Wife 
A1 Latham 

Right to Happiness 
George Laurence 
Sue of the South 
A. Leach 

Bonnie Annie Laurie 



A MASTERPIECE 


Bigger in Conception and Theme Than Any Other—Cost a Million Dollars— 
Over Two Years in Construction — Employed Ten Thousand People 

THE AY WON FILM COMPANY 

729 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 


“The World’s Largest Film Brokerage Representative” 


ARROW 

FILM CORPORATION 

W. E. SHALLENBERGER, President 

220 WEST 42d STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

■ 



W. E. SHALLENBERGER 

President Arrow Film Corporation 











Swat the Spy 
Tell It to the Marines 
Love Auction 
Putting One over 
John Leezer 
I’ll Get Him Yet 
Hope Chest 
Peppy Polly 
Boots 

Nugget Nell 
Out of Luck 
Marcel Le Picard 
Window Opposite 
Perfect Lady 
Daughter of Mine 
Day Dreams 
Leave It to Susan 
Conquered Hearts 
Ashes of Love 
Through the Wrong Door 
Elgin Lesley 
The Atom 
Irish Eyes 

A. Llgourl 

Romance in the Air 
World to Live In 
Red Head 
Marie Ltd. 

Silver King 

Embarrassment of Riches 
Firing Line 
Edwin Linden 

Wild Goose Chase 
Chester Lyons 
String Beans 
Hay Foot, Straw Foot 
Greased Lightning 
Girl Dodger 
The Busher 
Sheriff’s Son 
Law of the North 
Bill Henry 
Jack Mackenzie 
Toton 

Oliver Marsh 
The Brand 
Crimson Gardenia 
Hidden Fires 
Racing Strain 
Bondage of Barbara 
The Girl from Outside 
William Marshall 
Make Believe Wife 
Little Miss Hoover 
Secret Service 
Woman Thon Gavest Me 
Arthur Martinelll 
That’s Good 
Johnny on the Spot 
Kildare of the Storm 
Amateur Adventuress 
Sv]via on a Spree 
Fools and Their Money 
Favor to a Friend 
Stanley Mason 
Law of Nature 
Where Bonds Are Loosed 
Hugh McClung 
Arizona 

Knickerbocker Buckaroo 
Wm. McCoy 
Daring Hearts 
Barney McGill 
Devil M'Gare 
Breezy Jim 
Tom Middleton 
Old Maid’s Baby 
Milady O’ the Beanstalk 

Victor Miller 

Sealed Envelope 
Velvet Hand 
Cabaret Girl 
Jack Miller 
Safe for Democracy 
Kiss or Kill 
A. C. Miller 

Cry of the Weak 
The Profiteers 
Our Better Selves 
Japanese Nightingale 
Narrow Path 
Common Clay 
A Society Exile 
Tom Moiloy 
Girl Problem 
Adventure Shop 
Girl at Bay 
Unknown Quantity 
Thin Ice 
Two Women 
J. Monteran 
His Bridal Night 
Test of Honor 
Tother Dear Charmer 
Come On Tn 
Oh You Women 
Good-Bye Bill 
Come Ont of the Kitchen 


Alfred Moses 

Love Net 
Hand Invisible 
Harry Neumann 
Tongues of Flame 
Robert New hard 
Man In the Open 
Fuss and Feathers 
Happy Though Married 
. When Do We Eat 
His Birthright 
Diane of the Green Van 
A Man's Fight 

A. Nilson 

To Dim That Hath 
W. VV. Nobles 
Child ol M’sieu 
Steven Norton 
Restless Souls 
Grey Parasol 
Follies Girl 
Love’s Prisoner 
Beyond the Shadows 
Robert A. Olsson 
Beyond the Law 
Alfred Ortlieb 
Souls Adrift 
Unknown Love 
The Thirteenth Chair 
Louis Ostland 

By Hook or Crook 
Road to France 
Roy Overbough 
On the Jump 
Ernest G. Palmer 
Once to Every Man 
Miracle Man 
Paul Perry 

Good Gracious Annabelle 
Men, Women and Money 
Sporting Chance 
Pettigrew's Girl 
Cruise of the Make-Believe 
Janes Goes a Wooing 
Told in the Hills 
George Peters 

Wanted for Murder 
Unside Down 
Taxi 

Gus Peterson 
Her Purchase Price 
Louis Physioc 
Peck’s Bad Girl 
Perfect 36 

Up Stairs and Down 
Harry Plimpton 
Jungle Trail 

Why I Would Not Marry 
Checkers 

Sol Polito 

What Love Forgives 

Love Defender 

Ruling Passions 

Reckoning Day 

Are You Legally Married? 

Treason 

Bill Apperson’s Boy 
Burglar By Proxy 
Arthur Quinn 
Daring Hearts 
John Ramsey 
Scarlet Trail 
W. Reinhart 

Sins of the Children 

B. Y. Reynolds 
Fight for Love 
Three Mounted Men 
When A Woman Strikes 
Silk-Lined Burglar 

She Hired a Husband 
Taste of Life 
Beans 

House Without Children 
George Richter 
Fan Fan 
George Rizard 
Sporting Chance 
Six Foot Four 
This Hero Stuff 
Girl Woman 
Philip E. Rosen 
Love Hunger 

Little Brother of the Rich 
Eternal Magdalene 
Brute Breaker 
Miracle Man 
Charles G. Rosher 
Daddy Long Legs 
Captain Kidd, Jr. 

Johanna Enlists 
Too Many Millions 
The Dub 
Arthur Ross 
Miss Ambition 
Daring Hearts 
Leo Rossi 

In the Hollow of Her Hand 
Indestructible Wife 


Her Great Chance 
Julis Rossi 

Colonel Bridau 
Steve Rounds 
The Pretender 
Silent Rider 
Untamed 
Ir.ving Ruby 
Khavah 
J. Ruttenberg 
Woman, Woman 
Woman Who Gave 
My Little Sister 
Fallen Idol 
Yellow Dog 
R. B. Schellinger 
Our Teddy 
Kaiser's Finish 
Never Say Quit 
Max Schneider 
Amateur Widow 
Appearance of Evil 
Unveiling Hand 
Cavell Case 
Phii-for-Short 
Power and the Glory 
The Battler 
Praise Agent 
Geore Schneiderman 
Love is Love 

C. E. Schoenbaum 
Mystery Girl 
Girl Who Came Back 
Woman Next Door 
Women’s Weapons 
Winning Girl 
Best Man 
Venus in the East 
Something to Do 
Fires of Faith 
Abraham Schultz 
Desert Gold 
Ira B. Schwartz 
Prodigal Wife 
Homer Scott 

Light of Western Stars 
Shepherd of the Hills 
C. Seeling 
Enchanted Barn 
John Seitz 
The Westerners 
Joe Shelderfer 
Third Degree 
Spark Divine 
Lion and the Mouse 
Cambric Mask 
Captain’s Captain 
Joe Sidden 

What Shall We Do with 
Him 

Allan Siegler 

When a Girl Loves 
Unpainted Woman 
What Am I Bid 
Big Little Person 
Delicious Little Devil 
Weaker Vessel 
Danger—Go Slow 
Scarlet Trail 
Modern Love 
Robt. W. Stevens 
Girl Woman 
Walter Stradling 
Out of a Clear Sky 
Heart of the Wilds 
Ben Struckman 
Caught in the Act 
Robert Stuart 

Beating the Odds 
Green God 
Fighting Destiny 
Everybody’s Girl 
Man Who Won 
King of Diamonds 
Beauty Proof 
The Gamblers 
Charles Stumar 
Sahara 

Prisoners of the Pine 
Come Again Smith 
The Drifters 
End of the Game 
John Stumar 

Lady of Red Butte 
Home Breaker 
Hard Boiled 
Vive la France 
Quicksand 
Extravagance 
Other Men’s Wives 
Lucien Talnguy 
The Scar 
Mandarin’s Gold 
Hit or Miss 
Courage for Two 
Love in a Hurry 
Echo of Youth 


Love Cheat 
J. O. Taylor 
Grim Game 


As the Sun Went Down 
Wm. H. Thornley 
Dolly’s Vacation 
Better Times 
Turn in the Road 
Arthur Todd 
Deliverance 
H. Totheroh 
Shoulder Arms 
Sunnyside 

E. G. Ullman 


Wildcat of Paris 
Blinding Trail 
Society of Sensation 
Little White Savage 
Out of the Night 
John Urie 


Queen of Hearts 
Frank Urson 
You’re Fired 
Alias Mike Moran 
Roaring Road 
Love Burglar 
Ned Van Buren 
Kingdom of Youth 
Twilight 
Wild Honey 
Broadway Saint 
The Volcano 
John van de Broek 
Woman 

James C. Van Trees 

Who Cares 
Lady’s Name 
Veiled Adventure 
Happiness a la Mode 
Mrs. Leffingwell’s Boots 
Romance and Arabella 
Man from Funeral Range 
Final Close-Up 
Rescuing Angel 
Girls 

C. II. Wales 

Mask of Riches 
Deuce Duncan 
Tony America 
Dwight W. Warren 
Midnight Patrol 
George F. Webber 
City of Comrades 
Once of the Finest 
Go West Young Man 
Man and His Money 
Thirty a Week 
Upstairs 
L. Guy Wilky 
Tangled Threads 
Joseiyn’s Wife 
Hearts Asleep 
All of a Sudden Norma 
Goddess of Lost Lake 
Woman Michael Married 
Two Gun Betty 
Edwin VV. Willat 
False Faces 
Spotlight Sadie 
Frank D. Williams 
Secret Strings 
Poor Rich Man 
His Debt 
Man Beneath 
Glen Williams 
Knickerbocker Buckaroo 
Lawrence E. Williams 
Marriage for Convenience 
Marriage 

Bishop's Emeralds 

Walter Williams 
Splendid Sin 
Alvin WyckolT 

Squaw Man 

Don’t Change Your Husband 
Fires of Faith 
For Better, for Worse 
Edward VVynard 
Forbidden City 
The Red Viper 
Hal Young 
Girls 

Fires of Faith 
Private Peat 

Come Out of the Kitchen 
Let’s Elope 
Two Brides 
Woman of Impulse 
My Cousin 


Jack Young 
Nature Girl 


William Zollinger 
Key to Power 



N. A. M. P. I. Work During Year 


Because of the activities of the war much of the 
work of the N. A. M. P. I. during the year Aug. 31, 
1918 to Sept. 1, 1919 was with reference to that 
tremendous problem. 

There were various committees appointed for defi¬ 
nite work. These committees worked with the various 
War Boards. 

Adolph Zukor was chairman of the Liberty Loan 
Committee of the Association which raised millions. 

Suggestions were made to the Food Administration 
and through the use of slides much help resulted. 

P. A. Powers, Universal, was chairman of the spe¬ 
cial committee which secured film for entertainment 
for the troops. 

• As a result of the activities of the Association on 
Aug. 22, 1918, the industry was declared “essential” 
and saved from many annoying incidents. 

The committee headed by Walter W. Irwin also 
secured a reduction in the film tax which was lowered 
to five per cent from 10. 

In November, 1918, all restrictions were lifted. 

Various committees aided in securing funds for the 
Red Cross, Y. M. C. A. and other war relief charities. 

Regulations were adopted relative to exportation of 
films. 

Censorship and Sunday closing matters were in the 
hands of the committee headed by Gabriel L. Hess, 
Goldwyn. Resume of the work of this committee 
will be found elaborated elsewhere in this publication. 

Nathan Vidaver reelected chairman of the Legal 
and Legislative Committee. 

H. M. Pitman chairman of special committee work¬ 
ing on apprehending film thieves. 

Cases, containers and other shipping matters ad¬ 
justed and conditions improved by committee in charge 
of P. H. Stilson. 

A1 Lichtman chairman of special committee on Film 
Exchange Buildings. These special buildings are 
planned for a number of cities. 

Exhibitors League withdrew from Association which 
immediately started a campaign for exhibitor mem¬ 
bers. Watterson Rothacker chairman of Membership 
Committee. 

The A. M. P. A. (Advertisers) and the Natl. Fire 
Protection Asso. are among the affiliated organizations 
identified with the Association. 

Campaign inaugurated against the 5 per cent film 
rental tax. 

The Association took the lead in the fight when 
the “flu” raged in October, 1918, and all production 
and distribution ceased until Nov. 17. 

Special committee attended reconstruction meeting 
of the U. S. Chambers of Commerce at Atlantic City. 

Association behind effort to bring into the fold all 
the F. I. L. M. clubs and Managers Associations 
throughout the industry. 


Co-operated with Methodist Centenary to show 
value of films at Columbus festival. D. W. Griffith 
took many shots at Centenary for special film. 

Finances needed will probably cause either assess¬ 
ment or acceptance of gifts to meet operating cost of 
$1,500 weekly. 

Various luncheon and dinner events during year. 
Especially notable was the dinner to Wm. A. Brady 
and another to officers of the New York State Exhibi¬ 
tors League for their services at Albany in securing 
Sunday shows and killing proposed censorship. 

Plan to change New York City censorship regula¬ 
tions defeated. 

Wm. A. Brady re-elected president. 

Annual meeting held at Rochester where George 
Eastman of Eastman Kodak Co. served as host. 

The following tabulated statement shows the asso¬ 
ciation’s membership, which includes ninety-three 
companies: 


Producer, Class A. 25 

Producer, Class B. 5 

Producer, Class C. 17 

Exhibitor, Class 2. 1 

Supply and Equipment, Class 3. 14 

Distributor, Class 4. 15 

Independent exchanges . 3 

General Division, Class 5 

Individuals . 72 

Publications . 5 

Exporters . 7 

Bill posting companies. 1 

Studio directors . 1 

States right buyers. 1 


During the year 28 companies have been elected to 
membership and have been assigned to the following 
divisions: 


Producer, Class A. 11 

Producer, Class C. 3 

Exhibitors . 1 

Supply and Equipment. 1 

Distributors . 3 

Independent Exchanges . 3 

General Division. 

Publications . 3 

Exporters . 3 

Growth in Company Members. 

1917 .. 73 

1918 . 82 

1919 . 93 




























ARTHUR F. BECK PRODUCTIONS 

1919-1920 


LEAH BAIRD 


IN 


“THE CAPITOL” 

BY 

v AUGUSTUS THOMAS 

(Now in Production) 


DORIS KENYON 


IN 


“THE BAND BOX” 

BY 

LOUIS JOSEPH VANCE 

(Now in Production) 


SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS to be Distributed by Hodkinson 


STUART HOLMES AND MISS FRANKIE MANN 

IN 

“THE ISLE OF JEWELS’’ 

By CHAS. T. DAZEY 

With a Big Supporting Cast Including 

WILFRED LYTELL 

(Now in Production) 


FIFTEEN EPISODE SERIAL to be Distributed by Pathe 


S g 5 CURRENT RELEASES 

LEAH BAIRD IN “AS A MAN THINKS” 

French-American Society Drama— Hodkinson 

LEAH BAIRD IN “THE VOLCANO” 

Stirring and Timely Special— Hodkinson 



COMING 


Three Famous Broadway Plays in Pictures - - All-Star Casts 

Louis Joseph Vance Series ----- Four Per Year 
Two Serial Productions - - Fifteen Episodes Each 

Doris Kenyon Series ----- Four Per Year 

Leah Baird Series - Special Productions 

Augustus Thomas Series ----- six Per Year 



































\ 




















Scanned from the collection of 

The Wisconsin Center for 
Film and Theatre Research 


Coordinated by the 

Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 


Funded by a donation from 
Eileen Bowser